Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 8, August 2017

August gathering will recall
Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings


Now sunflowers carry new meaning. They have become the symbol of a world free of nuclear weapons.
Sunflowers were even used near Chernobyl to extract radionuclides cesium 137 and strontium 90 from contaminated ponds following the catastrophic nuclear reactor accident there.
This came about after an extraordinary celebration of Ukraine achieving the status of a nuclear free state. On June 1, 1996, Ukraine transferred to Russia for dismantlement the last of the 1,900 nuclear warheads it had inherited from the former Soviet Union. Celebrating the occasion a few days later, the Defense Ministers of Ukraine, Russia, and the United States met at a former nuclear missile base in the Ukraine that once housed 80 SS-19 missiles aimed at the United States.
The three Defense Ministers planted sunflowers and scattered sunflower seeds. Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma said, “With the completion of our task, Ukraine has demonstrated its support of a nuclear weapons free world.” He called on other nations to follow in Ukraine’s path and “to do everything to wipe nuclear weapons from the face of the Earth as soon as possible.” U.S. Secretary of Defense William Perry said, “Sunflowers instead of missiles in the soil would ensure peace for future generations.”
This dramatic sunflower ceremony at Pervomaisk military base showed the world the possibility of a nation giving up nuclear weapons as a means of achieving security. It is an important example, featuring the sunflower as a symbol of hope. The comparison between sunflowers and nuclear missiles is stark—sunflowers representing life, growth, beauty and nature, and nuclear armed missiles representing death and destruction on a massive, unspeakable scale. Sunflowers represent light instead of darkness, transparency instead of secrecy, security instead of threat, and joy instead of fear.
The Defense Ministers were not the first to use sunflowers. In the 1980s a group of brave and committed resisters known as “The Missouri Peace Planters” entered onto nuclear silos in Missouri and planted sunflowers as a symbol of nuclear disarmament. On August 15, 1988, fourteen peace activists simultaneously entered ten of Missouri’s 150 nuclear missile silos, and planted sunflowers. They issued a statement that said, “We reclaim this land for ourselves, the beasts of the land upon which we depend, and our children. We interpose our bodies, if just for a moment, between these weapons and their intended victims.”
In the aftermath of the Cold War, many people believe that the nuclear threat has ended, but this is not the case. In fact, there are still more than 15,000 nuclear weapons in the arsenals of the nine nuclear-armed countries. These countries have given their solemn promise in the Non-Proliferation Treaty, which entered into force in 1970, to negotiate in good faith to achieve nuclear disarmament, but they have not acted in good faith. It is likely that until the people of the world demand the total elimination of nuclear weapons, the nuclear weapons states will find ways to retain their special status as nuclear “haves.” Only one power on Earth is greater than the power of nuclear weapons, and that is the power of the People once engaged.
On August 8, Pax Christi Memphis will devote time to remembering the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945.  Prayer and discussion will point to the seriousness of the threat of nuclear weapons and the need to work for a nuclear weapon free world.


Pax Christi Memphis urges senators to consider single payer healthcare
In the time since our July gathering, Senate Republicans have failed to pass a bill that would repeal major provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Debate is certain to continue and the fate and health of millions of Americans will depend on the actions of the legislature in the months ahead.
Dr. Art Sutherland, who sits on the national board of Physicians for a National Health Program and
serves as state coordinator, held fast to his support of a single payer system when he spoke to our group last month.
Single payer national health insurance is a system in which a single public or quasi-public agency organizes health care financing, but the delivery of care remains in private hands. According to information provided by Dr. Sutherland, all residents of the US would be covered for all medically necessary services, including doctors, hospital, preventative, long-term care, dental, vision, prescription drug and medical supply costs.
 


Dr. Art Sutherland

The PNHP group contends that Americans already pay enough for health care for all – we just don’t get it. Because we pay for healthcare through a patchwork of private insurance companies, one-third of our health spending goes to administration.
The meeting was very well attended and the discussion that ensued was spirited and informative. The consensus among attendees was that until the health care system is fixed, things will continue to get worse.
As the discussion concluded, participants were asked to sign letters addressed to Tennessee’s two US Senators urging them to not support pending legislation that would ultimately leave millions of Americans uninsured, but to instead consider single-payer as a means of joining most industrialized nations that offer a much more stable system with lower spending and more efficient delivery of health services.

            
Mimi Wade, Tommie Cervetti, Bob O’Connor and Ro O’Sullivan were among those who packed our meeting space to sign letters and add personal notes to Senators Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander.


Our beloved Msgr. Al Kirk had the opportunity to visit with Pax Christi friends John and Terry Hash while vacationing in July. He is pictured here hiking near their home in North Carolina. Msgr. Kirk will lead the course, Living Peacefully in a Violent World to be offered this fall at St. Louis Catholic Church, 203 S. White Station Road. The course will be structured as four two-hour sessions from 7-9 pm on consecutive Thursdays commencing Oct. 5th. Additionally, it will be taught on two Saturdays, Oct. 14th and 28th, from 10 am until 2 pm.

  





The backpacks purchased feature the Pax Christi
logo and reflective stripes
for pedestrian safety.




Pax Christi will seek to fill backpacks for the poor and homeless
This Tuesday evening Pax Christi members will discuss further plans to distribute drawstring backpacks and the items to fill them to Manna House, which serves the city’s poor and homeless population in the tradition of the Catholic Worker Movement.


Donation boxes similar to
this will soon be placed
in area churches to hold
donated items.


  

Specifically, volunteers will be called forth to contact various churches and other venues in the Diocese and beyond. Our plans call for collection boxes to be placed in these locations during the month of September. At the end of the month, personal items helpful for survival on the streets will be delivered to Manna House to distribute among the people they serve.
A number of donation boxes have been purchased for this purpose, and a demonstration on how they can be assembled and distributed will be presented.

Suggested items for donation include: toothpaste/toothbrushes, deodorant, shampoo/conditioner, lotion, mouthwash, nail clippers, foot powder, Tylenol, soap, Kleenex, shaving gel/razors, Visine, Q-tips, feminine hygiene products, washcloths, socks, snack foods such as gra-
nola bars, nuts, protein bars, fruit snacks, etc., and gum.
Donations are being currently accepted at Bartlett Art Printing & Graphic Design, 2919 Elmore Park #4 in Bartlett. Call 266-2464 to arrange. Anyone without time to shop may make a monetary contribution by mailing a check to: Pax Christi Memphis, 4043 Allison Ave., Memphis, TN 38122. Just designate “backpack project” in the memo area of your check


Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 7, July 2017


Dr. Art Sutherland to lead
healthcare legislation discussion

Republican senators are currently scrambling to find enough votes to push through the “Better Care Reconciliation Act”, their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act typically referred to as Obamacare. The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has enumerated a number of concerns that they have expressed to lawmakers, noting that the BCRA does not honor the moral obligations they had provided them when senate discussions began.
In a June 22nd letter to the senate, the Bishops said, “It is precisely the detrimental impact on the poor and vulnerable that makes the BCRA unacceptable as written.”
This Tuesday evening, Pax Christi Memphis will discuss the proposed legislation, look at alternatives and suggest action that may provide a more favorable outcome for healthcare consumers.
 


Dr. Art Sutherland

Dr. Art Sutherland, well known to Pax Christi members as a proponent of single-payer national health insurance, will lead the discussion planned to begin at 7 p.m. at the Quaker Meetinghouse at the corner of Walnut Grove and Prescott. Dr. Sutherland is a retired physician and founder of the Sutherland Cardiology Clinic. He practiced cardiology in Memphis for 33 years and was the founder and director of the Methodist Healthcare Cardiac Laboratories.
Dr. Sutherland is state coordinator of the Tennessee chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program and is a member of the national board of directors. He has worked with the Healthy Memphis Common Table as an advocate for health equity initiatives that would improve population health. He is also
a member of the Memphis School of Servant Leadership and co-facilitates a course in social justice.
Dr. Sutherland received the Dr. Quentin Young Health Activist Award from PNHP in 2013.
As the discussion concludes, attendees will have the opportunity to submit letters to our senators and add personal comments as they see fit. We’ll take a brief look at groups and initiatives that have formed to address concerns around this issue.


Outline for course on nonviolent living under development by Msgr. Kirk and committee
As announced last month, Living Peacefully in a Violent World, a course led by Msgr. Albert Kirk, will be offered this fall at St. Louis Catholic Church, 203 S. White Station Road. The course will be offered as four two-hour sessions from 7-9 pm on consecutive Thursdays commencing Oct. 5th. Additionally,
it will be taught on two Saturdays, Oct. 14th and 28th, from 10 am until 2 pm.
In an outline submitted to the committee by Msgr. Kirk, he suggested possible texts such as Bishop Carroll T. Dozier’s pastoral letter Peace, Gift & Task, along with Pope Francis’ World Day of Peace Message.
Week one would include a look at difficult Old Testament scriptures with an explanation as to why these are not normative for us, and a
  
discussion centered around the New Testament teachings of Jesus and Paul. Participants will look at Bishop Dozier’s “the price of the cross” and explore a practical module of personal nonviolence.
Week two may include a study of Catholic tradition in the early church, before and after 313 AD focusing on the influence of St. Augustine and the Just War Theory. That session will conclude with an examination of today’s reality, why the Just War Theory no longer works, with more from Bishop Dozier, Pope John XXIII and ideas from Vatican II.
In the third week session, Msgr. Kirk suggests studying Pope Francis’ “Christian Revolution” with a discussion on what nonviolence is and is not, active nonviolence, and nonviolence as a style of politics. We will examine historic achievements in nonviolence and introduce the “circle of relationships tool,” followed by a look at nonviolence between spouses, within families, in the workplace and neighborhoods.
Possible topics suggested for the final session are a discussion of Nuclear Disarmament (Vatican Statements to UN, etc.) and the Arms Race, violence in our cities, Pope Francis’ “Disarming the heart” and a call for us to become artisans of peace, building a “just peace” framework and a spirituality of nonviolence and a final study of nonviolent action related to personal nonviolence.
Msgr. Kirk will be away for much of the month, but fine-tuning of the course outline will resume upon his return in August. In the meantime, he has left us with this reflection on today’s scriptures reading, which will surely be included with materials from Living Peacefully in a Violent World.
Blessed are you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth; you have revealed to little ones the mysteries of the kingdom.
The One who comes in humble manner will bring peace across the entire world.
The One who comes is without violence in establishing peace.
This is the meekness of which Jesus speaks.
In his courage that faces death and suffering he reveals the true strength of his meek and humble ways.
It is up to us to discover a new meaning of being meek in the way to peace, the way that faces opposition and evil yet turns from doing personal violence.
In a world of retribution and gotcha we follow the One  who walked the path of nonviolence.
When we forsake our own self-importance we can know the revelation of the One who sends Jesus to us.
In the simplicity of bread and wine we bend our faith to the message and we are charged to remember that truly Jesus remains with us and desires to walk with us as we share the truth of his way of living.



The backpacks purchased feature the Pax Christi
logo and reflective stripes
for pedestrian safety.




Pax Christi will seek to fill backpacks for the poor and homeless
An idea proposed at the June meeting has already received adequate funding for the first phase thanks to the generosity of just a few of our members and a wonderful new project is underway.
We often see the poor and homeless carry their meager belongings in flimsy plastic shopping bags or those designed to dispose of garbage.

Donation boxes similar to this will soon be placed
in area churches to hold
donated items.


  

Borrowing on an idea from Pax Christi Little Rock, it was suggested that we purchase a supply of sturdy drawstring backpacks, and attempt to fill them with items that might make life a bit easier for our less fortunate brothers and sisters.
In order to engage the broader community, donation boxes will be placed in area churches and other appropriate venues during the month of September.
Dr. Peter Gathje of Manna House approved of the idea and said his volunteers would fill the bags with items donated and distribute them appropriately to their clients in need.
Those wishing to donate items don’t have to wait until September. They will be accepted at Bartlett Art Printing & Graphic Design, 2919 Elmore Park #4 in Bartlett. Call 266-2464 to arrange. Anyone without time to shop may make a monetary contribution by mailing a check to: Pax Christi Memphis, 4043 Allison Ave., Memphis, TN 38122. Just designate “backpack project” in the memo area of your check. If your church, organization or place of business will facilitate a donation box during the month of September, please call the number above or email us at: info@paxchristimemphis.org.
Suggested items for donation include: toothpaste/toothbrushes, deodorant, shampoo/conditioner, lotion, mouthwash, nail clippers, baby powder, Tylenol, soap, Kleenex, shaving gel/razors, Visine, Q-tips, feminine hygiene products, washcloths, socks, snack foods like granola bars, nuts, protein bars, fruit snacks, etc., and gum.
When you’re shopping, please consider picking up a few of these items for donation, or send a check and we’ll do the shopping for you.

Budget agreed upon in June meeting
Jerry Bettice presented a very comprehensive treasurer’s report at the June gathering and projected what expenses we might expect in the coming year.
Pax Christi Memphis continues to explore the possibility of hosting a meeting or retreat with PCUSA Executive Director Sr. Patrica Chappell. In the event a visit from Sr. Patty isn’t feasible, other retreat possibilities were discussed, including a proposed joint gathering with Pax Christi Little Rock. Whatever scenario is agreed upon, adequate funding must be obtained.
In view of the need for a boost in the treasury, it was suggested that dues be increased for Pax Christi members from $20 per family to $50. Member Karen Scott stepped up with a generous offer to phone Pax Christi members who don’t regularly attend and solicit additional funds. At this Tuesday’s meeting, Karen will report on her efforts.

Note from Kat McRitchie at Mom’s Demand Action
We hope you’re having a good summer! Thanks to all who attended or volunteered for the Wear Orange event last month! This month, we’re back to our monthly meetings.  Next week we will get together to look at the upcoming season of events, and make local goals for how to reduce gun violence in Memphis.  
July Member Meeting
Wednesday, July 12, 2017, 7-9 pm
Shady Grove Presbyterian Church
5330 Shady Grove Road, Memphis, TN 38120

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 6, June 2017


Wearing orange for national gun violence awareness
Aleisha Curry, a registered nurse in charge of outreach at Regional One Trauma Center and volunteer with Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, cited her role as a mother for the principal reason she worked with the group.
In a presentation to Pax Christi Memphis, she teamed up with fellow volunteer Kat McRitchie to explain the organization’s activities, objectives and how the Mom’s movement came about. In doing so, they revealed some shocking statistics on gun violence in our country.
Curry said that out of 1300 gun deaths, 100 were unintentional and 400 blamed on suicide. Responsible gun ownership and safety are among their principal aims.
Statistics showed, Curry explained, that 70 percent of children knew where guns were kept in households that owned firearms. Furthermore, she cited a Harvard study that said one third of children in those households had handled the weapons.

 


Pax Christi Memphis accepted an invitation from Moms Demand Action to participate in the “Wear Orange” event at Robert Church Park in downtown Memphis on June 3rd. PCM was among many other groups who sought to bring awareness to gun violence issues in our community. Staffing the table are (standing) Paul Crum and Edward Ordman, (seated) Jerry Bettice, Judy Bettice and Pat Crum.


Aleisha Curry (left) and Kat McRitchie
with Moms Demand Action for
Gun Sense in America.

As a trauma center nurse and avid researcher, she was able to relate several personal stories about how gun accidents had affected the lives of victims, their families and survivors. The SMART program, which she teaches in the community includes guidelines for securing guns in homes and vehicles, practicing responsible behavior and asking about unsecured guns in other people’s homes, a practice she claimed to follow when her own children spend time in the homes of friends.
Kat McRitchie, group leader and mother of three, fur- thered the discussion by explaining how Moms Demand Action hoped to impact the community through education and advocacy.
McRitchie pointed to the confusing laws circulating through the Tennessee legislature, where more than two dozen pieces of proposed gun legislation were debated in March. Among them are laws aimed at reducing the need for carry permits, revisions to background checks,  amendments to “guns in trunks” laws, guns in parks, bars, college campuses and a whole array of laws aimed at reducing restrictions.
One of the most vocal legislators behind proposals is Rep.
Andy Holt, R-Dresden, who argues that it’s the easiest way to alleviate confusion. He was quoted in the Tennesean as saying, “The Constitution is extremely clear, but what we’ve done is muddled it up, with trying to add to or burden further what the Constitution clearly states, both at the federal and state level.”
McRitchie said the Moms Demand Action group lobbies at every level for common sense gun laws, and strives to work with other organizations and agencies to achieve their goal of reducing injury and death from firearms.
She invited Pax Christi Memphis to participate in a “Wear Orange” event that was planned for June 3rd, where several of the groups with which they interact would be represented.


Idea for course on living nonviolently comes to fruition
In April Pax Christi Memphis met to discuss various ways our local group could further the objectives of our national movement, particularly in regard to educating the wider community about Catholic teaching on nonviolence.
After a follow-up meeting on June 2nd to begin planning and discuss possible course content, we are happy to
report that “Living Peacefully in a Violent World” will be offered by the Diocese beginning October 7th, 2017.
  
The course will be offered as four two-hour sessions from 7-9 pm on consecutive Thursdays in a conference room at St. Louis Catholic Church, 203 S. White Station Road. Additionally, it will be taught on two Saturdays, Oct. 14th and 28th, from 10 am until 2 pm.
Msgr. Al Kirk, who will teach the course and was instrumental in planning and securing the location, pointed out that the course title and times might be subject to slight adjustment, but content is already being planned.
Present at the June meeting with Msgr. Kirk were Jerry and Judy Bettice and Paul Crum. 
The duration of the course will be adequate for catechists in the Diocese to receive credit for continuing education credits. Msgr. Kirk said that it was important to portray the Church as having a mission of peace, and to emphasize that nonviolence is a “force more powerful” than war. He said he would give examples where nonviolence has worked throughout history to bring about positive change.
The planning group examined a number of documents and an array of materials suggesting ideas about how the course might be structured and what might be included.
The Catechism of the Catholic Church, for example, has passages about avoiding violence, and portions of Pope Francis’ New Years message on nonviolence will certainly be mentioned.
The Just War Theory may be studied, and Jerry pointed to a recent article from Sojourners Magazine about transition from Just War to Just Peace. In that vein, Peace, Gift & Task: The pastoral letter to the people of the Diocese of Memphis by Carroll T. Dozier is likely to be examined as well. Passages from books by Gerard Vanderhaar were also mentioned as possible resource material.
Everyone agreed that the practice of finding peace within ourselves is fundamental to living nonviolently. Msgr. Kirk said, “In loving our neighbor as ourselves, it’s the ‘as ourselves’ that sometimes gives people trouble.”
Judy suggested that the idea of concentric circles might lend itself to course structure – that is personal, interpersonal and systemic. “We make changes within ourselves and extend them to others,” she explained.
The teachings of Jesus regarding nonviolence will probably precede a short history of the church; the first 300 years up to the Just War Theory, followed by a look at where we are today with the arms race and the impending threat of nuclear war. An examination of the idea of restorative justice – mutual forgiveness and repentance, should come toward the end of the course the committee concluded.
Blending all of these ideas into a concise course of study presents an exciting challenge, but represents one of the most tangible efforts Pax Christi has ever undertaken to spread the message of peace and nonviolence throughout our Diocese. Msgr. Kirk emphasized that we are all empowered by the Holy Spirit to be peacemakers. We must all pray for him as he leads us through the process of planning and implementing Living Peacefully in a Violent World.

June meeting will include budget discussion
For the past few months, Pax Christi Memphis has discussed various ways we might gain members and promote ideas of nonviolence throughout the larger community. As witnessed by the article above, one of those ideas is becoming a reality. Others are being proposed and considered, but all require financial resources.
In this Tuesday’s meeting, we will get down to the nuts and bolts process of examining a treasurer’s report so that we can realistically assess what we will be able to achieve in the coming months.
This is an important meeting and worthy of everyone’s time and attention. Please plan to join us for potluck at 6:30 pm and for the discussion to follow afterwards. We are a force for good and we must use our resources wisely.
 







May Birthdays
A Memorial Day gathering at the home of Ed Wallin and Janice Vanderhaar provided an opportunity to celebrate the May birthdays of Pax Christi members and friends. Pictured LtoR are Ray Berthiaume, Carole Blackburn, Judy Bettice and Margie Miller. Seated is Carol Carson.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 5, May 2017


Moms Demand Action will bring
two-part presentation on May 9th

Reducing gun violence will be the focus of two presenters from Moms Demand Action at our gathering this Tuesday evening. The presentation will commence at 7 pm following our regular potluck dinner at 6:30.
Moms Demand Action is a nonpartisan, grassroots movement of moms, dads, grandparents, and friends who are working toward common-sense public safety
measures that will reduce gun violence and save lives. Founded as a Facebook page by a stay-at-home mom who felt like she had to do something to stop gun violence after the Sandy Hook shooting in December 2012, Moms Demand Action now has chapters in all 50 states.
Moms Demand Action supports the 2nd Amendment, but believe common-sense solutions can help decrease the escalating epidemic of gun violence that kills too many of our children and loved ones every day. Whether the gun violence happens in urban Chicago, suburban Virginia, or rural Texas, they feel we must act now on new and stronger gun laws and policies to protect our children. As part of the Everytown for Gun Safety network, MOMS is working toward a vision of an America where all children and families are safe from gun violence.

 





The BeSMART presenter, Aleisha Curry is a volunteer with the group, specifically with the BeSMART campaign. She is also a mother and a registered nurse in charge of outreach for Regional One Trauma Center.
The BeSMART Presentation is designed to be a conversation about kids, guns, and safety.
Last year alone, at least 264 people across the United States were unintentionally shot by children. In Memphis alone there have already been 2 reported shootings by children with unsecured guns found in the home. Nearly all of these incidents are preventable with proper safety and
gun storage. In addition, over 400 teenagers in the US kill themselves each year with unsecured guns. The BeSMART program aims to keep kids safer by introducing five easy steps to parenting and everyday life –
• Secure guns in homes and vehicles.
• Model responsible behavior.
• Ask about unsecured guns in other people’s homes.
• Recognize the risks of teen suicide. 
• Tell peers to be SMART. 
Moms 101 will be presented by Kat McRitchie, who volunteers as the local group leader for Moms Demand Action in Memphis. In life-beyond-MOMS, Kat is a mother of three and a teacher educator. 
The Moms 101 presentation is a brief introduction to Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.  It covers their history, goals, strategies, and how to get involved with your local group.

Discussion produces ideas on
furthering  goals and actions

An informal discussion centered around the goals and actions of Pax Christi Memphis produced a number of ideas and suggestions aimed at educating the community in Christian nonviolence and furthering the objectives of our national movement as set forth in their statement of purpose.
It was proposed that a five to eight hour course centered around Catholic teaching on nonviolence be offered by the Diocese. Msgr. Al Kirk was mentioned as a well-suited leader for such classes, while others offered that additional instruction might come from qualified Pax Christi members as well.
The length of the course would be sufficient for participants to receive credit for catechesis training. Plans were made to contact Sr. Cathy Galaskiewicz, O.P., Director of Catachesis, to study the feasibility of such a course.
Other ideas put forth included increased participation with other groups with whom we share common ideas. One such organization would be MICAH (Memphis Interfaith Coalition for Action & Hope). Hugh Taylor, who is representing Pax Christi with MICAH reported that over 100 people have been trained in Community Organizing and that a structure committee is working on a constitution and bylaws. At some point in the future, PC Memphis will make a contribution in some form to officially affiliate itself with this group.
Methods for attracting new members were also a part of the discussion. Many thought bulletin inserts were a good idea – especially one promoting our “Potluck for Peace”. Others suggested paid advertising in bulletins, particularly the Cathedral bulletin.
The meeting opened with John Dear’s “Prayer for the Arkansas Eight” and some members proposed action such as prayers on the Cathedral Steps, with additional attention paid to Catholic teaching on the death penalty.
Arkansas carried out the executions of four men last month. Eight were scheduled, but half were stayed. While in Little Rock to attend John Dear’s lecture at the Clinton School, Paul and Pat Crum spoke with Abe Bonowitz, Director of Affiliate Support National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. He suggested that PC Memphis re-establish ties with the Tennessee Coalition, as he felt the issue would continue to gain national prominence.
Members were further encouraged to carry Pax Christi business cards and to develop their own “elevator speech,” that is a one minute explanation of our movement’s goals and ideas so that we may effectively respond to inquiries. Perhaps a future exercise might be for our members to recite their own short answer to the question, “What is Pax Christi?”

 
Be a part of
planning CNV Actions








Planning for Campaign Nonviolence Week of Action, September 16-24, 2017, takes place the first Wednesday of every month at Caritas Village. Get involved! Next meeting is June 7th at 6:30 pm. Contact Monica Juma for more information: monica.morman@lmunet.edu




Several Pax Christi members walked the Neighborhood Stations of the Cross sponsored by St. Patrick’s on Good Friday, April 14th. The ninth station was the sniper’s lair from which Dr. Martin Luther King was shot. “Now we stand and ponder the horror that took place here. Let us not stop, look and go about our business. We are here to do more than stare at the fallen.”

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 4, April 2017

Discussion planned on maintaining consistency with PCUSA’s Statement of Purpose
An informal prayerful discussion on maintaining continuity with the statement of purpose articulated by Pax Christi USA is planned for Tuesday, April 11th. Some members have expressed a wish to examine the work our local chapter has performed, and the issues we choose to address as they relate to the aims and objectives of the national and international movements.
We will examine some of the literature published by Pax Christi USA, and discuss ways we can more effectively promote peace and justice in the current political climate.
We are called upon to work toward peace in our personal lives and in communities of reflection and action to transform structures of society. Pax Christi USA rejects war, preparations for war, and every form of violence and domination. It advocates primacy of conscience, economic and social justice, and respect for creation.
Additional discussion will center around the advisory committee’s meeting with Bishop Holley, and with upcoming plans for our city’s hosting of Campaign Nonviolence’s National gathering.
We hope also to be updated by Hugh Taylor regarding the organizing efforts of MICAH (Memphis Interfaith Coalition for Action & Hope).
Discussion will commence following a potluck meal at 6:30 pm. 


Pax Christi Advisory Committee
has fruitful meeting with Bishop

The Most Reverend Martin D. Holley, installed recently as the fifth Bishop of Memphis, met for nearly 90 minutes with members of the advisory committee of Pax Christi Memphis on Friday, April 7th. The consensus among those attending was that the meeting was a productive introduction and found the Bishop to be engaging and attentive.
Janice Vanderhaar presented a brief history of the important part Memphis played in the establishment of Pax Christi USA, highlighting the significant role of our first Bishop, Carroll Dozier, as a nationally recognized peacemaker. She pointed out that Bishop Dozier’s portrait is prominently displayed outside the National Civil Rights Museum.

 


Bishop Martin Holley

Bishop Holley said that he had not yet had the opportunity to visit the museum, but was not surprised at the history of support of the civil rights movement by the church.
Members told the Bishop that they would provide him with a copy of Peace, gift & task, Dozier’s pastoral letter authored with the help of Pax Christi Memphis members in the early 1970’s.
Bishop Holley, who had three brothers who served in the Vietnam War, stated that he was no pacifist and said a number of times that he felt the US Military was a necessary deterrent. He did agree that war is no answer to solving conflicts and that the US spends far too much on national defense. He told the committee that a majority of his fellow bishops felt the same way.
“It is important to constantly preach the message of peace,” he told the committee. “Evil against evil will constantly escalate more.”
While claiming he couldn’t tell parish priests “what to preach,” Bishop Holley did say he would advocate for peace and “put it front of them.”
The real power for change, however, lies with the people in the pew he said, adding “Our problems won’t be solved with politics.”
Bishop Holley appeared to be open to the possibility of having Pax Chrisi Executive Director Sister Patty Chappell speak to an assemblage of Diocesan Priests at some point in the future, but emphasized that he would have to present the idea to the appropriate boards and councils.
After just a few months in his new role, he appeared to be impressed with the charity exhibited by the Memphis Community.
“I have never seen a city do so much for the poor,” he said, adding that he is excited by the appointment of a new director at Catholic Charities, and the possibility of creating new jobs through that agency.
He emphasized time and again the importance of jobs in combating violent crime, stating that he felt the creation of jobs was more important than establishing a just wage.
“With the breakdown of the family, people need meaningful opportunity,” he said.
Along with Janice Vanderhaar, others representing Pax Christi Memphis were Deacon Henry Littleton, Msgr. Albert Kirk and Paul Crum.


Pax Christi Memphis was happy to be present at the 2nd Annual MusliMeMfest festival, a celebration of the community to enrich the human experience in Memphis. Muslims in Memphis’ mission is to foster an interest in building bridges and strengthening relationships between the diverse peoples of Memphis and Shelby County. Funded almost entirely by generous sponsors and supported by the City of Memphis, the MusliMeMfest is free to the public. Pictured above staffing the PCM booth are Karen Scott and Deacon Henry Littleton. Others who worked the booth at the March 25th event were Judy and Jerry Bettice, Brenda Hale, Janice Vanderhaar, Ed Wallin and Paul Crum.

 
Activism and music blend interest
at well attended
March meeting






It is not the responsibility of marginalized groups to explain their oppression, according to Sydney Kesler, College Student Organizer for the Official Black Lives Matter Chapter in Memphis.
“People must be free to be who they are,” Ms. Kessler told Pax Christi members at the March gathering. “We must first acknowledge our own privilege, and that involves a litany of different things.”
The campus leader presented a brief history of the BLM movement, pointing out that there was an “official” organization and network while some groups existed outside of it.
“Violence is often more than physical,” she said. “Our goal is to live in a place that exists without violence.
“Every time that we don’t identify people as who they are, we are violent,” she continued. “Because we are restricting people to be who we think they should be.”
Ms. Kessler and some of her supporters who attended the meeting pointed to the need for transformative justice in government institutions and the education system.
They urged their audience to support the cause by trusting the marginalized groups.
“We must trust them to lead us,” Ms. Kessler concluded.
A last minute addition to the March agenda was entertainment by folk musicians Nell Levin and Michael August who comprise the Shelby Bottom Duo. Opening and closing our meeting with their music, the duo also promoted their Musical History of Joe Hill and the Early Labor Movement.



Currently they are touring the area and describe themselves as playing literate songs that tell an engaging story and often reflect on or make a commentary on the society that we live in.
“We have played for many good causes including the environment, and economic and social justice. Our interest is to meld music, fun and a higher consciousness,” they write on their Facebook page, where fans can keep track of their current engagements.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 3, March 2017


Campus Organizer Sydney Kesler will present
program on local Black Lives Matter chapter

Sydney Kesler, College Student Organizer for the Official Black Lives Matter Chapter in Memphis, will update Pax Christi Memphis on the work with which the movement is currently involved. Her presentation will begin at 7 pm on Tuesday, March 14th.
Sydney is completing her junior
year as an undergraduate student at the University of Memphis majoring in Marketing Management with a minor in African American Studies.
The Official Black Lives Matter Memphis Chapter is just over a year old.
“We are proud of the important work that we are undertaking which includes our: vigils for black children and black women, free lunch program, panel discussions, community forums and direct action demonstrations,” she said. “We fight for liberation of all black people. We lift black women, black people who are a part of the LGBTQIA community, and black people who are often left out of the narrative for the fight for justice and equality.

 
Program for
March 14th Gathering

Sydney Renee Kesler
The program will begin at 7:00 after we share a
potluck dinner at 6:30. All are welcomed.

In addition to her work with the Memphis BLM Chapter, Sydney is also one of the founding members of The FedUp Student Body. She explained that this is a new organization composed of a unified focused group fighting oppression on different collegiate campuses and includes members from The University of Memphis, Rhodes College and Christian Brother University.
The public is invited to join us for a potluck dinner at 6:30 pm that will precede Sydney’s talk at the Quaker Meetinghouse, Walnut Grove at Prescott.

  COMMENTARY 
Black Lives Matter is a Pro-Life Movement
by paul crum

This past January I listened to a homily delivered by a deacon in my church in which he contrasted two popular social movements. He was filling in at the pulpit on that particular weekend because our pastor was participating in the March for Life in Washington, DC. The deacon heaped praise upon those who had traveled to our nation’s capital to advocate for the rights of the unborn, but he offered little in the way of support for the actions of those involved in Black Lives Matters protests here and in neighboring cities.
The deacon, himself a man of color, was particularly critical of the blowback directed at civil rights icon Andrew Young, a former Georgia congressman, Atlanta mayor and ambassador to the UN. Speaking in the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, Young accused activists of “being stupid,” telling a group of college football players that members of the group were wrong to react with anger and emotion to social injustices.
Young even invoked the words of Martin Luther King, Jr. to criticize the tactics of BLM activists. In an earlier interview, he told the Washington Post, “You don’t get angry with sick people, you work to heal the system. If you get angry, it is contagious, and you end up acting as bad as the perpetrators.”
Young’s speech, and similar subsequent remarks, were met with protests and even criticism by the NAACP. Our deacon pointed out that Young had been called an “Uncle Tom” by many in the Atlanta movement and wondered aloud why BLM activists couldn’t behave more like the peaceful demonstrators gathered in Washington on that particular weekend.
It was at that moment that it occurred to me that Black Lives Matter is a pro-life movement.
My thoughts ran back to watching television interviews with Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, parents of Trayvon Martin. It was their child, a 17-year-old high school student killed by a neighborhood watch captain while walking unarmed through a Miami Gardens neighborhood, who brought national media attention to the issue of killing young men of color by law enforcement officials and others. In fact, the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter is said to have first appeared in response to the acquittal of Martin’s killer, George Zimmerman.
I recalled the “Mothers of the Movement” who took the stage at the Democratic National Convention and held back tears to speak of the deaths of their children.
“Give me two moments to tell you how good God is. Give me a moment to say thank you,” said Geneva Reed-Veal, whose 28-year-old daughter, Sandra Bland, died in jail after being pulled over for a traffic stop in 2015. “We are not standing here because he’s not good. We are standing here because he’s great.”
Reed-Veal demonstrated the commitment of faithful parents to the cause of protecting their sons and daughters from senseless, preventable killing, as did the eight brave women who stood with her that evening. All over the world now, mothers and fathers are standing with their communities to campaign against “… a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise.”
Their statement bears resemblance to other pro-life statements I have heard. While some will argue that “those lives can’t be compared to the innocent, unborn,” I would suggest the life of an unarmed individual regardless of their color, history or situation is worth just as much. They are entitled to the protection and due process afforded us all by our legal system.
Black Lives Matter has grown to address issues beyond extrajudicial killings of black people by police and vigilantes. They work for the validity of life that includes the entire gender spectrum, gay community, disabled and all those who have been marginalized by systemic racism. They remain committed to nonviolence and I pray that their actions will always be met with a peaceful response.
While I’m far from being the first to recognize BLM as pro-life, reflecting upon the idea has made me proud to be involved with a Pax Christi movement that stands in solidarity with BLM and with all who struggle for justice and equality. I’m prouder still that our Memphis chapter will hear rom a young, dynamic local leader of BLM, Sydney Kesler, a student activist who will address our group this Tuesday evening at 7 pm.
It promises to be an informative, life affirming program.
 


 

 From Reconciliation with Justice
 Pax Christi USA Reflections for Lent

Practicing nonviolence leads us to believe in the inherent and God given beauty, dignity, and capacity for transformation of each person. Nonviolence is described as two hands: one hand to stop violence and the other to reach out to the opponent. Both are essential. Sr. Anne McCarthy, OSB
Jerry Bettice leads exercise in civil discourse
Practicing personal nonviolence in our group discussions is an important discipline in our work as peacemakers, and Jerry Bettice led our group in an exercise that reminded us all of some tools vital to effectively sharing our beliefs at the February gathering.
After a review of particular ground rules and guidelines, Jerry wisely engaged us, not in a hypothetical discussion, but in a dialogue centered around certain proposals and issues recently presented by a Pax Christi member.
Jerry pointed out the differences in debate and dialogue, such as assuming there is a right answer and you have it, versus assuming that many people have pieces of the answer and that together they craft a new solution. The group also learned that instead of listening to find flaws and make counter arguments, we should listen to understand, find meaning and identify agreement.
He emphasized the importance of speaking one at a time until everyone has had a chance to speak, and of restating what you heard for clarification to allow the other person to know if you have understood correctly.
A number of resources were shared and discussed. As the session concluded, participants seemed amazed that following the guidelines resulted in an amiable, fruitful discussion in which concrete ideas were thoughtfully expressed. All agreed that we would greatly benefit by reviewing these rules of civil discourse regularly as we engage one another and others outside our sphere.

 
The Gerard A. Vanderhaar Symposium
at Christian Brothers University
Presents
New York Times Bestselling Author
Shaka Senghor
Hurt People, Hurt People
March 31st at 7 pm
Christian Brothers University Theater
Admission is free and open to the public
Visit www.gvanderhaar.org for more information


Shaka Senghor
President and CoFounder of #Beyond Prisons,
a national leading voice in
Criminal Justice Reform.

Josh Spickler

Executive Director of JUST CITY,
a powerful, independent voice for the individuals, children and families who are or have been
in contact with the criminal justice system.
MARCH 31 - APRIL 1
CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY


PLENARY SPEAKERS
Gabriela Benitez

Organizer for the Detention Watch Network in Chicago, developing and supporting member campaigns to take action to end
immigration detention.

Mahal Burr
Bridge Builders Community Action Coordinator who trains and supports youth organizers in creating social change in their communities.


Register at
www.GandhiKingConference.org
 
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 2, February 2017


Sharing our beliefs is different from discussions in learning factual material.  The kind of sharing that leads to learning from one another in our Pax Christi community benefits from some simple practices. These might be considered integral to our practice of personal nonviolence.
A Contrast Between Discussion and Dialogue will be presented by Jerry Bettice when our group meets on February 14th.
“Our interactions will be framed,” said Jerry, “hopefully, in the context of nonviolent communication.”
 
Program for February 14th Gathering
The program will begin at 7:00 after we share a
potluck dinner at 6:30. All are welcomed.



Peace alone is holy – not war. Violence profanes the name of God
On January 10th six Pax Christi members reflected on select sections of Pope Francis’ World Day of Peace message, Nonviolence: A Style of Politics for Peace. Printed below are brief excerpts from those reflections, some paraphrased. It is our prayer that the world will heed the Pope’s call to nonviolence, and that an encyclical devoted to peace may be forthcoming.


 

Janice Vanderhaar

“This is a quantum leap forward or a radical redirection. The pope in his introduction talks about making active nonviolence a way of life. He was very inclusive at the beginning. He wants to get everybody aboard. It’s unusual that he talks about it as a style of politics. The church doesn’t encourage people to talk about politics in the pulpit in the way Francis is talking about. He encourages us to think of ways to solve conflict in the world, and I think there’s been a lot of energy and effort around that lately.”
Monica Juma
“How do we acknowledge and quiet that violence and fear within, acknowledge that unconditional love and become an agent of nonviolence? How do we make it our way of being? John Dear recommends 30 minutes of quiet meditation and prayer a day. Studies are coming out that show that those who meditate have physical changes in their brain ... so now there is evidence that daily prayer and meditation that Gandhi and others urged can lessen our fears and enable us to go out and live nonviolently.”

 

 Ray Berthiaume
“One way to bring about nonviolence is being available to people in your own life circumstances. Another aspect is being voices heard. Pax Christi may be a mouse, but we need to roar like a lion. Make our presence known. There are practical ways of making the public aware of the presence of a population that does not believe in violence as a remedy for problems, but in presence and activity in a nonviolent way.”

Msgr. Al Kirk
“Nonviolence is not passivity, it is not lack of caring and it is certainly not surrender. We need to steer (Dr. King’s words) into people’s minds, ‘Violence never buys permanent peace, it solves no social problems, it merely creates new and more complicated ones.’ If you read the comments from the last couple of days about increasing our Navy, you get the impression that it is war that’s holy – it’s war that’s going to bring about peace. And if we can just throw enough money into it we’ll be able to bring about a peaceful world. War just creates problems.”
 

 Deacon Henry Littleton
 “How does the analogy of a family fit with the message of Pope Francis that violence finds its source in the heart? I think it is that moment when there is a fundamental decision to do something good or something less than good. Once we start to think of what we are doing in our heart - to our family members, and the pursuit of happiness in the family becomes a possibility, and through that the desire to promote goodness throughout society. It’s a way of playing it out – an analogy between the two.”


Jerry Bettice
“Somebody went to a place of need and a woman said to them, “If you came here to do things for us, you can go home. But if you’re going to work with us and collaborate, then you can stay.” I think that’s something that we as Pax Christi could do better. Engage with people who are already working and even find solidarity with people in need. Another important theme of the pope’s writings is dialogue. How do we sit down with people we don’t agree with? I have to examine my own heart and ask how nonviolent am I in my speech and in my thoughts?”
 




In 2017, may we dedicate ourselves prayerfully and actively to banishing violence from our hearts, words and deeds, and to becoming nonviolent people and to build nonviolent communities that care for our common home. “Nothing is impossible if we turn to God in prayer. Everyone can be an artisan of peace”.
From the Vatican, Dec. 8, 2016
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 1, January 2017



Pope Francis’ message to be topic of reflection at January 10th gathering
“When victims of violence are able to resist the temptation to retaliate, they become the most credible promoters of nonviolent peacemaking,” Pope Francis said in his World Day of Peace message prepared for January 1st.

The Holy Father urged the faithful toward nonviolence by pleading, “In the most local and ordinary situations and in the international order, may nonviolence become the hallmark of our decisions, our relationships and our actions, and indeed of political life in all its forms.”

The papal document, Nonviolence: a Style of Politics for Peace, will be the topic of brief reflections when Pax Christi Memphis meets on Tuesday, January 10th. The program will begin at 7 pm after potluck.
Six of our members will analyze component parts of the document and offer their remarks on (1.) The introduction, (2.) A Broken World, (3.) The Good News, (4.) More Powerful than Violence, (5.) The Domestic Roots of a Politics of Nonviolence and (6.) My Invitation.
Clearly, the Holy Father’s historic message comes at a time when concern about worldwide aggression is paramount. Columnist Tony Magliano writing on the Pax Christi USA website says, “Francis points out that meeting violence with violence produces tremendous suffering, not only in death and destruction, but by diverting necessary resources for human life to military ends. And judging from recent dangerous comments of President-elect Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin, the world could get far more violent.”
Magilano goes on to point out that Trump – a day after meeting with Pentagon and defense contractors – called on the U.S. to “greatly strengthen and expand its nuclear capability” until the rest of the world “comes to its senses” regarding nuclear weapons.
Pax Christi has played a key role in encouraging the pope to speak out on nonviolence. In mid-December, the Catholic Nonviolence Initiative gathered in Rome to reflect on and discuss the Holy Father’s message, and to strategize about next steps for this critical movement. The Catholic Nonviolence Initiative grew out of the
landmark April 2016 Nonviolence and Just Peace conference, co-sponsored by the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace and Pax Christi International, and is focused on affirming the vision and practice of active nonviolence at the heart of the Catholic Church.
Among many others who gathered last month in Rome were Pax Christi International co-presidents Marie Dennis and Bishop Kevin Dowling; Bishop Marc Stenger bishop president of Pax Christi France; Greet Vanaerschot, secretary general of Pax Christi International; Ken Butigan, Pace e Bene; Pat Gaffney, Pax Christi British section; Fr. Renato Sacco, Pax Christi Italy; Fr. John Dear, Campaign Nonviolence; and former Pax Christi International secretary general Jose Henriquez.
In a press release Ms. Dennis and Bishop Dowling said, “We are committed to following up on this statement on a deep level. It has raised many topics that deserve much reflection, and we are ready to help spread this message of nonviolence in whatever way we can.” 



The Catholic Nonviolence Initiative that gathered recently in Rome included many
prominent members of the Pax Christi movement and Campaign Nonviolence.


Financial Support Needed
Our treasurer reminds us that it’s time for our annual appeal for financial support for Pax Christi Memphis. That’s $15 for an individual; $25 for a couple; $5 for student or one on limited income. Any amount greater in any category will be appreciated. Checks can be mailed to Pax Christi Memphis, 4043 Allison Ave., Memphis, TN 38122 or collected at any meeting.

Vow of Nonviolence Renewal
In keeping with our observance of the New Year, we will renew our Vow of Nonviolence, composed by Eileen Egan and Rev. John Dear, S.J., at the conclusion of our program on January 10th, and join with thousands of our fellow peacemakers in striving for peace in ourselves and in our daily lives in the coming year.

Women’s March planned for January 21st
Pax Christi Memphis has been asked to support a Women’s March beginning at 10 am on January 21st. It will originate at the Courthouse and end at the National Civil Rights Museum. Monica Juma attended a planning meeting on the 14th and reported a good turnout. She said organizers are expecting as many as 500 participants.
“It seems like a really positive movement,” Monica said. “They emphasized that it’s not a protest of Trump but a show of solidarity for diversity, women’s rights, civil rights, etc. Part of their mission statement is 'we will work peacefully while recognizing that there is no true peace without justice and equity for all.' It was started in Memphis by a handful of women who didn’t know each other previously or have much experience in activism but who wanted to do something after the election.”
Monica will share more information and distribute flyers promoting the event at our meeting  on January 10th.

Sierra Club continues work to protect the Memphis Aquifer
For those who heard the Sierra Club’s Conservation Program Coordinator Scott Banbury at last month’s meeting, know that efforts continue to address the recent denial by the Groundwater Quality Control Board of their appeal. For a copy
of Scott’s viewpoint column from the Memphis Flyer that outline deficiencies in
the 1987 groundwater ordinance on which the decision was based, see Paul Crum.

Letter to the Editor
To  Memphis Pax Christians:
We have a new bishop servant-teacher. I urge us to be bold in communicating what Pax Christi is all about. Be completely honest. Express clearly our goals, without embarrassment or compromise. We have nothing to lose.
I also think PC should cooperate with other individuals and groups that seek the same goals. Some folks that come to mind:
Scott Banbury [Environment]  Rev. Billy Vaughan [Servant Leadership]  Dr. Peter Gathje [Ethics] Fr. David Knight [Spirituality] Dr. David Ciscel [Quakers] Dr. Nabil Bayakly [Muslims] Chip Ordman [Ecumenism] Rev. Elaine Blanchard [LGBT Community] Dr. Art Sutherland [Medical] etc.
Some issues/topics we might ask our servant-teacher to address publicly:
WMDs, especially nuclear weapons, Divorced & remarried members, Gays and Transgendered folks, $15 minimum wage scale, Healthcare, Homelessness, Veterans,   The present, long-standing war in the Middle East, U.S. use of drone killings, Gun control, Women deacons, Israeli settlements in the West Bank, married priests.
Ray Berthiaume Dec. 25, 2016


Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 12, December 2016

The demand for the perfect is the enemy of the possible good. Be peace and do justice, but don’t expect perfection in yourself or the world. Perfectionism contributes to intolerance and judgmentalism and makes ordinary love largely impossible. Jesus was an absolute realist, patient with the ordinary, the broken, the weak, and those who failed. Following him is not a “salvation scheme” or a means of creating some ideal social order as much as it is a vocation to share the fate of God for the life of the World, and to love the way that God loves—which we cannot do by ourselves. – Richard Rohr
 


Scott Banbury to address board’s decision to allow TVA aquifer drilling
As reported at last month’s meeting, the Tennessee Valley Authority has been working quietly to obtain permits to drill five wells into the Memphis sand aquifer to tap local drinking water as the water source for cooling their new Allen Power Plant. In fact, permits have already been issued for three wells and they have already been drilled. The Sierra Club appealed the permits for wells 4 and 5 and the appeal was heard by the Shelby County Water Quality Control Board on November 30, 2016.
The unanimous decision by the Shelby County Ground Water Quality Control Board was to reject the appeal. According to Randy Blevins of the Protect the Aquifer movement, “The TVA, partnering with the Shelby County Health Department, mounted a vigorous, meticulously planned and well funded case against the appeal.

 
 
“There was very little deliberation or discussion by the board after a full day of witnesses. Most of the limited discussion centered around technical aspects of the power plant and water delivery as opposed to possible contamination of the aquifer. There seemed to be little interest in overall environmental impact with efforts only to mitigate “chances” of contamination - as if any desired wells by a third party are a foregone conclusion.”
This Tuesday, December 13th, Scott Banbury, Conservation Program Coordinator for the Tennessee Chapter of the Sierra Club, will address the ongoing efforts of a local group formed to resist TVA’s use of our drinking water for this purpose.
Scott is also expected to talk about other issues that have raised concern among local environmentalists, including construction of the Diamond Pipeline, an oil pipeline that will stretch across Arkansas and enter Memphis via President’s Island, an area where the natural clay layer that normally protects most of our sand aquifer, doesn’t offer protection against contamination from an oil leak. Another important issue involving TVA is a decision to bring a massive amount of renewable energy to the area.
TVA will soon decide whether or not to sign an agreement with Clean Line Energy Partners before wind energy incentives are phased out.
Clean Line Energy Partners is building a major energy infrastructure project – known as the Plains & Eastern Clean Line – to deliver over 4,000 megawatts of affordable wind power from Oklahoma and Texas to the Southeast. That’s enough electricity to power more than 1.5 million homes and businesses!
The Plains & Eastern Clean Line is one the biggest leaps forward for clean energy in the country, and it will provide all kinds of benefits, from creating jobs, to sparking innovation and economic development, to helping ensure the U.S. meets the carbon reduction commitment that was made at the Paris climate summit last December.
Please plan to attend this very important meeting regarding what the effect on our local environment will be from the actions of those in the business of selling energy.


Suzanne Martin presented a brief workshop on
mindfulness training at our November meeting.




 
Suzanne Martin teaches Pax Christi to bring mindfulness to everyday life
According to Suzanne Martin, who spoke at our November gathering, our amygdala is always on. We are in a constant state of stress.
That part of our brain, she explained, is the reason we are afraid of things outside our control. It also controls the way we react to certain stimuli, or an event that causes an emotion, that we see as potentially threatening or dangerous.

Suzanne, who teaches Mindfulness and Religion at Immaculate Conception Cathedral School, brought a wonderful presentation on Mindfulness to Pax Christi and offered many useful tips and resources to aid in the practice of controlling our emotions and controlling our “monkey mind”, which she described as the constant chatter that occurs as try to perform four or five tasks simultaneously.
“We have approximately 50,000 thoughts a day,” she estimated. “We must focus on how emotions feel in our body.”
She recommended that instead of stimulus followed by response, we interject mindfulness between the two. Suzanne spoke of “finding our anchor, sitting with a straight back and feeling our breath” as methods for entering a more relaxed state. She pointed out that “mindful movement,” or paying attention to our bodies, was also helpful, as was regular meditation and focused breathing.
Another component to the practice is heartfulness, which she described as purposefully having kind thoughts or wishing happiness for yourself or others.
Some of the benefits of practicing mindfulness, according to Suzanne, are:
• better focus and concentration
• decreased stress and anxiety
• improved impulse control
• skillful responses to difficult emotions
• increased empathy and understanding of others


 
Memphis couple travels to Little Rock to encourage new Pax Christi USA chapter
Pax Christi Memphis members Paul and Pat Crum accepted an invitation from the newly formed Little Rock, Arkansas chapter to speak at a recent gathering on December 5th.
Meeting at the home of George and Sherry Simon, they spoke to 13 members who will form the core group of peacemakers. Sharing from experiences in helping PC Memphis with communication, actions and program planning, Paul offered the group praise and encouragement for forming a presence of peaceful witness in the neighboring state.

December 5th happened to be World Soil Day, as proclaimed by the UN Secretary General. Citing the parable of the sower from Matthew: 13, Paul said he was humbled and blessed to think that he might have sown some seeds by speaking about Pax Christi to many of the missionaries he travels with to Honduras each summer. A number of them help comprise the new chapter.
Paul said that in his mind he would always think of them as “Pax Christi Fertile Soil.”
The group is off to an impressive start. Already they have completed the paperwork to form a 501c3 non-profit corporation. At the meeting they elected officers and a board of directors, made plans for a website and Facebook page and spoke with enthusiasm about possible actions.
Dr. Sherry Simon will lead the group. She, along with her husband Dr. George Simon, visited Memphis for the first weekend of Campaign Nonviolence actions in 2014. On that trip, they met many of the members of the Memphis chapter.
Sherry has already been busy visiting and contacting other peace and social groups in the state, and looks forward to networking and assisting their efforts while Pax Christi USA Little Rock expands their membership and becomes a powerful force for peacemaking in central Arkansas.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 11, November 2017
 


Suzanne Martin to offer Mindfulness presentation at November meeting
Mindfulness, described as the psychological process of bringing one’s attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, will be the focus of a presentation by Suzanne Martin at Pax Christi’s November 8th meeting.
Suzanne, who teaches Mindfulness and Religion at Immaculate Conception Cathedral School, received training through Mindful Schools in Oakland, CA, where she participated in foundational, curriculum and communication courses. She is currently in her fourth year at Immaculate Conception.

 
 
She explained that Mindfulness is the awareness that comes from paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.
“It’s like exercise for your mind, building the attention muscle in your brain,” she said. “A lot of science in the last few years has documented the benefits of mindfulness: greater concentration, self-awareness, to notice and shift out of unhelpful routines, being more responsive and less reactive, being aware of thoughts, emotions, and impulses to act,
the ability to let go, acceptance, to live in the present, not the past or future.”
Suzanne said she would share some simple routines with Pax Christi members and guests. Please plan to attend what promises to be a very informative and beneficial presentation.

Researchers are finding that mindfulness meditation helps people overcome many health-related issues such as stress, high blood pressure, heart disease, substance abuse, and much more. They’re also finding that the practice helps people enhance their mental capabilities such as abstract thinking, memory, and creativity. It even helps people improve their leadership and social skills.


The cause of Peace has had my share of efforts, taking the ultra non-resistance ground - that a Christian cannot consistently uphold,
and actively support, a government based on the sword, or whose ultimate resort is to the destroying weapons.

Lucretia Mott

The Lord showed me, so that I did see clearly, that he did not dwell in
these temples which men had commanded and set up, but in people’s hearts... his people were his temple, and he dwelt in them.

George Fox


 

Ciscels present fascinating program on Quaker history and beliefs
Carol and David Ciscel brought Pax Christi members a most interesting program on the history and practices of Quakers at our October 11th gathering. Speaking in tandem, the couple explained the origins of the Society of Friends, highlighting individuals important to its history,
explained how they themselves became members and revealed the structure of a normal worship service.
Carol noted that the Friends began as a grass-roots movement and talked at length about George Fox, who as a young man in the midst of the English Civil War, traveled to London in 1643 to begin a quest to answer his own questions and satisfy his longings. His travels, during which he would study and hold long discussions with clergymen, helped him shape his own religious beliefs.

By 1647 Fox began preaching publicly and began to attract a following who at first called themselves “Children of the Light” or “Friends of the Truth” and later simply “Friends.” Known as a religious dissenter, Fox’s beliefs led him to distance himself from the established church. Early on he wrote: “... as I had forsaken the priests, so I left the separate preachers also, and those esteemed the most experienced people; for I saw there was none among them all that could speak to my condition. And when all my hopes in them and in all men were gone, so that I had nothing outwardly to help me, nor could tell what to do, then, oh, then, I heard a voice which said, “There is one, even Christ Jesus, that can speak to thy condition”; and when I heard it my heart did leap for joy.”
Carol noted that Quaker’s devotion to peace comes from a theological belief that we have a direct connection to the divine, and no need for mediations to “hireling priests.” We are equal in the way that matters most. Therefore, to bear arms against one another is to bear arms against God.
Fox traveled in North America in 1671 and spent about two years here.
Almost immediately he was accused of stirring up a slave revolt in the West Indies, and was forced to write a letter to the governor refuting the charges. When he arrived in Maryland he met with other Quakers and with Native Americans as well, and was impressed by their general demeanor, which he said was “courteous and loving”. After traveling around the American colonies, he returned to England in 1673 confident that the Quaker movement was firmly established here.
Obviously well-studied in Quaker history, Carol, who retired from teaching history at the University of Memphis, went on to provide a fascinating narrative of the Friends’ role in resisting violence in the first and second World Wars and beyond.
She also spoke of the important role Quakers played in the abolitionist movement and noted that in the 1700s Quakers were united in the belief that the enslaved had a “natural and just right of liberty” and no Quaker should think to claim a human being as property. Slavery was, in Quaker eyes, a “national evil.”
Women’s Rights were another area Carol noted where the Friends were ahead of history. She highlighted Lucretia Mott, a noted Quaker pastor who formed the idea of reforming the position of women in society when she was amongst the women excluded from the World Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840.
David Ciscel said he became interested in the Society of Friends as a result of the anti-war movement during the Vietnam era. He had been a proponent for Civil Rights as a young student and found common ground with a friend who shared with him his Quaker beliefs.
The Ciscels provided information on how their group typically worships, and how as a congregation they reach decisions by mutual consent. No decisions are finalized unless all agree. The Friends are firmly committed  to the cause of peace.

Did you Know?

... that Pax Christi is not the only group that enjoys the hospitality of the Memphis Friends?
The Memphis Zen Group meets there on Mondays at 5:45 p.m. and the Black Lives Matter steering committee meets every first Sunday.
Memphis Friends runs a Food Pantry, collects t-shirts for Manna House, diapers for the Family Safety Center and boxtops for
Bellevue Middle School.
They began Worship Sharing for an LGBT group in October.



Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 10, October 2016
 


Historian, economist and anthropologist to present program on Quaker history and practices on October 11th
Since December 2014 Pax Christi Memphis has enjoyed the hospitality of the Memphis Friends, who have so generously allowed us to use the beautiful Quaker Meetinghouse for our monthly gatherings. Most of our members are familiar with the long tradition of peacemaking fostered by the Religious Society of Friends, however, many have expressed an interest in learning more about Quaker history and practices.
This Tuesday, we will be privileged to hear from Carol and David Ciscel of the Memphis Friends. Both have been members of Memphis Friends for over 30 years, and have been active in their annual event – Southern Appalachian Yearly Meeting and Association – for at least 20 of those years. David is currently active in Quaker EarthCare Witness, a national orgainziation of Friends concerned about climate change.
Many Pax Christi members know David through his work with local labor rights and living wage initiatives, and also with his involvement with the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center. He taught in undergraduate and graduate programs at the University of Memphis for 33 years, and was Dean of the School of Business at CBU. He has published more than 200 academic articles on a variety of topics.
Carol is an educator as well – an historian who was also a faculty member at the University of Memphis.
"I read Quaker history quite a bit – just finished a book on how the Civil War challenged the Friends' peace testimony," she told us. "None of this means we know everything about it, but I think we could engage in a lively discussion with Pax Christi."

 
 
It is notable that Quakers were among the first Americans to denounce slavery, were active in the abolitionist movement and supported the "underground railroad."
Carol said her husband joined Friends in Iowa in the 70s to find a community of people opposed to the Vietnam War and brings that personal experience to the narrative.
"Oh, and our clerk, Laura Helper-Ferris might come with us," Carol added. "She comes from a family with a Quaker background – they knew Rufus Jones, a weighty Quaker in the early 20th century – and she is an anthropologist."
With a diversity of backgrounds and disciplines, these speakers will surely provide an entertaining and informative session for our meeting this Tuesday. The program will begin at 7 pm, preceded by our usual potluck dinner at 6:30. Please plan to attend.
 


 

Campaign Nonviolence Actions received much publicity including coverage on at least three local TV stations during the week of action Sept. 18-24. Many Pax Christi members participated in a number of events.





Pax Christi members and friends from a prayer group met on October 2nd, the International Day of Nonviolence, for a prayer service and discussion. Deacon Henry Littleton brough some artwork from his school, Our Lady of Sorrows in Frayser and displayed it on the front lawn of Jerry and Judy Bettice's home.

Ideas for future meetings suggested at September gathering:
Will ask PCUSA Executive Director to visit
Our September meeting provided a time for visioning of ideas and discussion of future topics and speakers.
In November, we hope to hear a presentation on Mindfulness by Suzanne Martin.
Mindfulness is a much discussed practice in our modern culture. It is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training.
Large population-based research studies have indicated that the practice of mindfulness is strongly correlated with well-being and perceived health. Studies have also shown that rumination and worry contribute to mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety, and that mindfulness-based interventions are effective in the reduction of both. We will surely benefit from Suzanne's presentation.
Other discussion at the September gathering touched on establishing dialogue with our new Bishop, Martin D. Holley, particularly on "The Nonviolence and Just Peace Conference statement: An Appeal to the Catholic Church to re-commit to the centrality of Gospel Nonviolence." Jerry Bettice indicated that the document might also be discussed during a prayer service at the their home on October 2nd, the International Day of Nonviolence.
Msgr. Al Kirk suggested we might focus attention on a recent statement on Iran: Nuclear Weapons and Nonviolence, and Carol Carson brought up our support of the Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance.
It was further suggested that we contact Sr. Patti Chappelle of Pax Christi USA about a trip to Memphis in early 2017. Paul Crum reported that he had been contacted by friends in Little Rock about the formation of a Pax Christi chapter there, and wondered if Sr. Patti might include a presentation to address their group as well.
A few goals for the coming year were proposed, mostly aimed at presenting the Pax Christi message to the broader Catholic Community, and deeloping strategies to achieve our aims. It was suggested that we contact the editor at FAITH West Tennessee about a feature article on our group, as well as David Waters at The Commercial Appeal. Others urged that we consider programs addressing nuclear proliferation and related environmental issues.
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 9, September 2016
 


Slain Sisters Paula Merrill and Margaret Held remembered
as beloved members of Pax Christi Memphis
In last month’s issue of this newsletter we printed Pax Christi USA’s statement on the brutal murder of Fr. Jacques Hamel as he celebrated Mass in France. It seems somewhat surreal now to once again reflect on more senseless killing, this time much closer to home and to our hearts.
Sisters Paula Merrill and Margaret Held were found in their home in Durant, MS on August 25th. Their killer was arrested just a few days later and confessed to the horrible act. Both sisters were 68 years old and worked tirelessly to serve the people of the surrounding community.
Sr. Susan Gatz, president of Merrill’s religious congregation, the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, was quoted as saying that Held and Merrill were “extraordinary in just an ordinary, simple way.
“What made them superb is they loved the people they served,” Gatz said.
Many members of Pax Christi Memphis remember the sisters attending meetings here during their time at Holly Springs. A few of them traveled to Mississippi to attend memorial services for them there.
Janice Vanderhaar offers this remembrance.
Srs, Margaret Held and Paula Merrill were two amazing women who exemplified Gospel Nonviolence as they served the poorest of the poor through their healing skills as nurse practitioners in Mississippi for over 30 years, first in Holly Springs and then at the medical clinic in Lexington.
They went out of their way to raise funds for those who could not afford their medicine which they often desperately needed. They often wore the hat of social worker in one of the poorest counties in the nation.
Pax Christi Memphis especially remembers them coming to our
meetings during the ‘90’s when they were on mission at the medical clinic in Holly Springs. They would prepare very creative prayer services and even helped organize one of our retreats. We were always blessed by their presence.  

 
 
Paula Merrill



Margaret Held
We’ll never know why they were brutally slain but we can be sure that they would forgive the man who killed them asking God’s mercy on him.  The sisters’ communities, School Sisters of St. Francis, Milwaukee, WI and the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, Ky, have both made statements that there should be justice, not revenge through the death penalty for Rodney Sanders.
They left a legacy of healing, love, compassion on many people’s lives as Jesus did.  They died as true martyrs both by the way they lived and the death they endured.
Paula and Margaret, Presente!
 

 
Life of St. Francis presented
in unique perforance

A special performance by David Hoover of Inscape Ministries comprised last month’s Pax Christi meeting at St. Patrick at The St. Patrick Center downtown.
David said he drew from the works of Fr. Murray Bodo, Fr. Richard Rohr and Carlo Carretto to write the play, adapting bits and pieces to flesh out the story, which was organized into a number of scenes:
• Francis Appears • The beginnings • A false start • Naked before the Bishop
• Embracing the leper • The mystery of Gospel poverty • All creation
• The Wolf of Gubbio • Our dream of peace and non-violence
• The secrets of Jesus
The Hoovers expressed their appreciation for the support offered by Pax Christi Memphis with this note:
We just want to say thank you for organizing the opportunity for us to be with the Pax Christi group.  It was a privilege and gift to be there. And what a wonderfully receptive group...that always draws a good performance from the presenter.
We also want to thank you and the Pax Christi group for the generous donation of $200. The audience gave $167 so your generosity will allow us to take our presentations into other places.
We hope that sometime in the future we will be back in Nashville and maybe at that time we can visit with you, also.
Blessings,
Sharon and David Hoover
Inscape Ministries

Plans for Campaign Nonviolence week and
report from national meeting on agenda for September

September began with participation in the Workers Interfaith Network Labor Day Picnic for many of our Pax Christi members, and the month promises to be a busy one, especially for those involved with the Interfaith Vigil and other activities planned around Campaign Nonviolence’s Week of Action beginning September 18th.
Monica Juma will provide details on the groups involved and the activities planned
at our September 13 meeting.
Janice Vanderhaar and Ed Wallin returned recently from the Pax Christi USA National Conference in Baltimore, and will present their report on what they learned and witnessed there.
Other discussion will include visioning meetings and ideas for the future PCM gatherings and aims and goals for the year. Future meetings may include a presentation on “Mindfulness” as well as a program on the history and
background of the Quaker Peace and Social Witness movement. Join us to discuss our plans for future programs.
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 8, August 2016
 


Play based on the life and spirituality of Saint Francis presented this Tuesday
So, was Francis crazy? Was he a fool? Crazy with Love? A fool for Christ embracing lepers and preaching to the birds? And just a bit mad to
believe that God was proposing peace and non-violence as a way of life?
Come and decide for yourself!
This Tuesday, August 9th, Pax Christi Memphis and Inscape Ministries are pleased to present Saint Francis: Face to Face, a one-man “reader’s theatre” play in which Saint Francis is given “special permission” by the heavenly powers to return to earth from the communion of saints to visit with us for a brief time –
to speak with us “face to face.” He’s been sent back to our time to share with us something that is in danger of being lost: the freedom and joy of Gospel living.
 
 
He invites us into the adventure of holiness and helps us to see that who we call “Saint Francis” in fact lives deep within each of us only awaiting our awakening to the call to the adventure of sanctity to which Jesus invites us. He shares famous moments from his own
life and reveals their relevance to ours—and ends by sharing some of the “secrets of Jesus” that he learned.
David Hoover brings to life this inspiring spiritual teacher from the past. We learn of his deepest struggles and intuitions about the meaning of life and death, about prayer, mystical
experience, war and peace — and the way of universal compassion and non-violent love which flows from a life of union with God.

 David Hoover brings to life this inspiring spiritual teacher from the past. We learn of his deepest struggles and intuitions about the meaning of life and death, about prayer, mystical
experience, war and peace — and the way of universal compassion and non-violent love which flows from a life of union with God.

David teaches in Orange, California in the school for the
formation of Spiritual Directors offered by the Sisters of St.
Joseph of Orange. Together with Sharon Halsey-Hoover, the actors and storytellers travel the country offering productions on Thomas Merton, Dorothy Day and other workshops and retreats.
St. Francis: Face to Face will be staged in the St. Patrick Center (just behind the church) at the corner of M.L. King, Jr. Ave. and 4th Street. It will begin at 7 pm and admission is free. Coffee and refreshments will be served afterward.
For more information on Inscape Ministries, please visit http://www.inscapeministries.com.



Remember Hiroshima, August 6, 1945

“To remember the past
is to commit oneself to the future.
To remember Hiroshima
is to abhor nuclear war.
... In the face of the ... calamity
that every war is,
one must affirm and reaffirm,
again and again,
that the waging of war
is not inevitable or unchangeable.
Humanity is not destined to self-destruction.”
Pope John Paul II
“Someday, the voices of the hibakusha will no longer be with us to bear witness. But the memory of the morning of August 6, 1945, must never fade. That memory allows us to fight complacency. It fuels our moral imagination. It allows us to change.”
President Barrack Obama
“Japan knows the horror of war and has suffered as no other nation under the cloud of nuclear disaster. Certainly Japan can stand strong for a world of peace.”
Martin Luther King Jr.
“I shall write peace upon your wings,
and you shall fly around the world
so that children will no longer have to die this way.”
Teshima Yusuke
A woman who was a schoolgirl at Hiroshima asked, “Those scientists who invented the atomic bomb, what did they think would happen if they dropped it?”
Jonathan Glover

Pax Christi USA issues statement on the Killing of Father Jacques Hamel
It is with heavy hearts that we grieve the acts of violence taking place in the world. As people of faith rooted in the social teaching of the Catholic Church we are saddened by the recent brutal murder of Fr. Jacques Hamel during the celebration of the Mass in France,
and the subsequent killing of his murderers. We pray for Fr. Jacques, the people who killed him, the officers who killed them, and all those affected.
It is easy to go along with the fearful rhetoric surrounding this event, but we choose peace instead. The signs of the times tell us that there is a preponderance of division among us. We see groups pitted against one another in politics, religion, and society. We see that many forget we are all human and that we all need one another.
Monsignor Oscar Romero, who was also killed during the Mass, gives us inspiration and direction during this time. He said, “I don’t want to be anti, against anybody. I simply want to be the builder of a great affirmation: the affirmation of God, who loves us and who wants to save us.” Romero’s words are the answer. We do not need to blame, we do not need to be against anyone, but we need to be a purveyor of God.
We know the antidote to the division the world is experiencing is love, justice, and peace.
For the complete text of this statement visit
https://paxchristiusa.org/


Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 7, July 2016
 
July 12th will be an evening for prayer and reflection
Pax Christi often cites a model of prayer, study and action in its work of promoting nonviolence and peacemaking. It seems fitting, and especially appropriate, given the events of the past few days, that we gather this Tuesday for a time of prayerful reflection.
Jerry Bettice will guide us through a series of readings as they relate to calls for diplomacy, justice and peace. Members and guests will have an opportunity to reflect on each of the readings.
Jerry has asked that members bring with them a bible and pen, and has also suggested the following scriptures to read and reflect upon prior to Tuesday’s gathering.
2 Samuel 2-28, 32-35
A tale of diplomacy in the face of threat of violence?
Zechariah 9:9-10
Peace to the earth
John 8:1-9
Jesus intervenes to prevent bloodshed
Luke 9: 51-52; 10:1-6
The message of peace on the road to Jerusalem
Paul’s message of the cross: 1 Corinthians 1:18 
Philippians 2:7-8 • Ephesians 2:14-17
We cannot begin to grow in nonviolence except through prayer, fasting and solitude. Every program of nonviolence, whether Gandhi, Martin Luther King or St. Francis of Assisi, has emphasized that the beginning of nonviolence and the continuing center of nonviolence is prayer, fasting and the gift of self. Then out of that comes expressions of nonviolence. Nonviolence is not a tactic or series of actions, it is a form of prayer that becomes a realization of the kingdom.
 Jim Douglas


Lynching presentation by Latta and Gamble stirs interest & emotion

Judge Jennie Latta, J.D., Ph.D., and Randy Gamble’s June 14th presentation on lynchings stimulated much interest among Pax Christi members who attended the meeting. Many asked questions following the talk, illustrating how much previously unknown information was revealed, and how much emotional impact the stories can bring.
“It was sad and shocking,” one member remarked, “but at the same time very interesting that all of this took place right here. I’m so glad I attended. Jennie and Randy did a wonderful job.”
Randy noted that confronting the legacy of racial terror is about racial justice, which is the theme or Pax Christi USA’s National Conference this year, making it a fitting topic for discussion.
Lynching Sites of Memphis hosts a Facebook page for those interested in learning more about the history surrounding this history, and ongoing dialogue and current events related to racial justice in our community.

July meeting will include discussion on communication among various groups
With 118 homicides in Memphis so far this year, it’s little wonder that residents are worried about the level of violence in our city, or that churches and community groups have organized to address their concerns.
Too often, however, we hear about meetings, prayer vigils, rallies and demonstrations after they have already occurred. Some of our members have wondered if there might not be a way to establish improved channels of communication among the various groups formed to advocate nonviolence.
We have already begun to informally reach out to those of whom we are aware, but every incident of violence brings about new concerns and often results in new initiatives to reduce violent crime and killing.
Whether it be via a website, text messages, an email network or other forms of communication, a better system is needed so that we can support the noble efforts of community organizers and people of faith in working against violence.
Please bring any ideas you might have on this topic to our July 12th gathering and be prepared to share them. We will set aside a few minutes for brainstorming and discussion.
We sometimes feel frustrated that our peacemaking efforts yield little result in light of the level of violence we see. Perhaps joining with others will enhance our ability to make a real difference.
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 6, June 2016
 
Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror:
A PRESENTATION BY JUDGE AND ACTIVIST

The June Pax Christi gathering will feature a presentation on the history and ramifications of racially motivated lynching in our area by US Bankruptcy Court Judge Jennie D. Latta, J.D., Ph.D., and Randell Gamble, local activist and Pax Christi member.
The talk will include information on Ida B Wells, who started her anti-lynching campaign in Memphis as the result of the lynching of Thomas Moss, owner of the Peoples Grocery,
and two of his workers in 1892. The Memphis chapter of the NAACP was organized as the result of the lynching of Ell Persons on May 22, 1917. These are just two of the 21 lynchings that occurred in Shelby County, more than any other county in Tennessee.
Two extraordinary African American men have written about the history and impact of lynching. The first is the late Dr. James Cameron (1914-2006), who was the only known survivor of a lynching in Marion, Indiana on August 30, 1930. Dr. Cameron became a Catholic after this incident and went on to write and speak about his experience. His book is entitled, A Time of Terror.
The second is Dr. James Cone, a professor at Union Theological Seminary in New York, who is best known as an advocate of Black liberation theology. His book is entitled, The Cross and the Lynching Tree. Despite these works, many people are unaware of the history of lynching in Memphis and Shelby County.
In 1989, attorney Bryan Stevenson founded the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, to provide legal representation to prisoners who may have been denied a fair trial. On February 15, 2015, the Equal Justice Initiative issued a report called, “Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror.”



Jennie D. Latta, J.D., Ph.D.

Randell Gamble
To date it has collected information on more than 3,959 lynchings that occurred in twelve southern states between 1877 and 1950. Mr. Stevenson spoke at the Facing History & Ourselves banquet in Memphis last year. He suggested that we begin to talk about the history of racial violence and to mark the sites of lynchings in our community.  As a result of his words, several people have come together to create a movement
 for change. They have organized prayer vigils and listening circles, and have started to gather information about racial violence in Memphis and Shelby County. The goal of this work is to encourage conversation and confrontation of the injustice, inequality, anguish, and suffering that racial violence has created in the past and in the present.
Jennie D. Latta, J.D., Ph.D., is a life-long Memphian, a convert to Catholicism, and a United States Bankruptcy Judge for the Western District of Tennessee. These experiences have caused her to reflect and write about the impact of poverty and  racial violence on our community.  She is the author of “The Memphis Lynching Log,” which recounts the story of the arrest and lynching of Ell Persons.  
Randell Gamble is a native Californian, retired navy veteran, St. Patrick’s parishioner and community activist with experience in race relations and nonviolence. He has been involved with Pax Christi Memphis for more than 20 years, and is former chairperson of the local chapter anti-racist team and a former member of the national catholic peace movement anti-racism team. Randy is actively engaged with issues related to race relations and was featured in the Catholic Peace Voice (2004), CTTT Collection of Stories (2010), and Faith Magazine. His journey of faith has recently led him to the Lynching Sites Project.

A Reflection on the Interfaith Prayer Service held at the Ell Persons lynching site
Pax Christi Memphis was represented by members Randell Gamble, Ed Wallin and Janice Vanderhaar a recent Interfaith Memorial Service at the site of the Ell Persons lynching. Randy offered these comments on their experience there.
It is such a blessing to be a part of the Lynching Sites Project of Memphis, (please see our Facebook page.) I have been able to witness such an outpouring of the Holy Spirit where people are coming together for real conversation on our racial history in America.
The gathering of so many people from different background at the Interfaith Prayer Service was nothing short of God’s Amazing Grace. To hear the two young African American women (students) from Overton High School tell a brief story of Ell Person was incredible. There were so many connections made by this encounter, and I was glad to see young people from St. Agnes Catholic School as well. The song “We Remember,” sung by Antonio Neal was fitting for this 99th Anniversary and offered further proof that “Black Lives Mattered” in the past as well as the present. All of this is the work of racial justice is chronicled in “Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror”, a report that the Equal Justice Initiative (http://www.eji.org/) came out with last year. I have been inspired by their Executive Director Bryan Stevenson who spoke at 1866 Memphis Massacre dedication at the National Civil Rights Museum. I appreciate all of the people that are showing up for the work that lies ahead for the Memphis community.  My question is how do we reflect upon the priorities of Pax Christi USA in the context of this moment through prayer, study, and action?


SSeveral Pax Christi members and friends gathered recently on a beautiful spring evening at the home of Janice Vanderhaar and Ed Wallin. The party was an opportunity to celebrate several May birthdays, say goodbye to our beloved friend and leader Terry Hash, and to bestow blessings and good wishes on Paul Crum, who will be traveling with a medical team as part of a mission to Honduras in June, sponsored by Christ the King Catholic Church in Little Rock.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 5, May 2016
 
Teaching self control early provides alternatives to violent behavior

Jamie Goldring has a recipe for self control and she is more than willing to share it. In fact, she has made it her life’s work to teach students of all ages that they are responsible for their own behavior, and to provide tools that allow them to respond to their emotions in a positive way.
At next Tuesday’s Pax Christi gathering, Jamie, a teacher who has worked with children for more than 30 years, will describe the methods she uses in her workshops to stem the violent behavior so prevalent in our schools and throughout society. The activities and techniques she employs are designed to encourage the development of a lifestyle that inspires kindness, empathy and mindfulness through the development of self control.


 
Jamie earned her B.A. in Sociology from California State University and her M.A. in Speech Pathology from the University of Memphis. She is the author of Discover ME, Teaching Children Self-Control, and Tools and Techniques For Teaching Children Self-Control. These resource books, for teachers and parents, are designed to teach children the skills and strategies they need to control their impulses. She is also the author of I Believe, a children’s storybook and CD and three posters: Peace, Believe, and Self-Control.

Local media has reported that 11 children under age 17 have already been killed in Memphis this year, part of a total of 69 total homicides. The ability to resolve conflict peacefully would no doubt make a significant difference in the number of murders, assaults and other violent acts. Teaching these skills early, and throughout middle and high school years would yield significant positive results in any community.

But Jamie is also quick to point out that learning skills related to self control leads to higher academic achievement as well. In her presentation, she teaches that self control comes from the same frontal lobe area of our brain that

gives us the ability to focus attention, plan, organize, solve problems and think abstractly.
“Teaching children self-control is the first step to improving the emotional landscape in our homes, schools, and communities,” Jamie says. “As parents and teachers, we have a responsibility to our children. It is our job to prepare them to handle life’s many challenges and become productive citizens. Children not only need to be prepared academically, but they also need to be prepared mentally and emotionally.”

Jamie’s presentation will begin at 7 pm, and the public is welcome to a potluck dinner that will precede her talk.
Visit Jamie's website to learn more.

Fight for $15 share their struggles of living on minimum
wage with Pax Christi Memphis

Both Mary Payne and Dunetra Merritt claim that their involvement with the movement to raise the minimum wage goes far beyond their own financial struggles.
“I’m standing on the front lines for my grandchildren,” said Dunetra, who as the 42-year-old mother of four and grandmother of two is forced to live with her daughter to survive on fast food worker wages.
Her feelings were echoed by Mary Payne, 76, who barely gets 25 hours of work per week at $8.25 per hour. She watches her own grandchildren work two jobs at minimum wage to get by.
Union organizer David Mott pointed out that it would take such workers 390 years to earn the amount that the CEO of KFC makes in one year.
“It’s not just a moral argument,” David said. “It’s a civil rights issue.”
It is also very much at the heart of Catholic Social Teaching as was pointed out in the discussion. A living wage was advocated as early as 1870.
Jayanni urged our members to contact legislators at every level of government to push for a living wage of $15 per hour. Some of our members stood with members of the movement just two days later when they demonstrated locally at a Day of Action protesting “McWages.”



Activist Jayanni Webster brought Dunetra Merritt, Mary Payne and David Mott to share stories from
the Fight for $15 Movement at the April Pax Christi gathering.



We mourn the loss of two peacemakers
For one to have their funeral officiated by a Presbyterian minister, a rabbi and an imam is a testament to a life of open mindedness and religious tolerance. Eunice Eleanor Breckenridge Niles Stetson Ordman was a member of Balmoral Presbyterian Church, but was also a member of Temple Israel and began attending Masjid As-Salaam, their local mosque, after 9/11. She was also a friend to us at Pax Christi Memphis.
Her death at age 91 comes after a life filled with travel and adventure, but also a lifetime of service, compassion and a love of people that stretched beyond the boundaries of race and religion. According to her husband Chip, Eunice understood the intricacies of the stock market, but was just as comfortable teaching physics or computer science.
Her death will leave a void in the local interfaith community, but we can always let the memory of Eunice serve as an example of what true commitment to peacemaking should be.
Read Commercial Appeal Columnist David Water's tribute to Eunice Ordman here.

The peacemaking community lost another friend on April 30 when Fr. Daniel Berrigan, S.J., a Pax Christi USA Teacher of Peace and one of the most revered figures within the Catholic peace movement, passed away at age 94.
Pax Christi USA Executive Director Sr. Patricia Chappell, SNDdeN said of him, “Daniel Berrigan was a man faithful to the transformative values of living out the Gospel. Until his very
death, he modeled for all a spirituality of non-violence and peace-making. Pax Christi USA mourns the passing of Dan Berrigan, one of the most widely admired peacemakers of our time. His life and witness have inspired thousands to learn and embody the nonviolence at the heart of Jesus teachings.”
Read Daniel Berrigan's full obituary and more about his life here.
 
 
Eunice Ordman


Daniel Berrigan, SJ

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 4, 2016
 
Poverty wages to be addressed by Fight for $15 movement representative

Jayanni Webster, a local leader in the Fight for $15 movement to improve low wages and working conditions for workers, will explain the goals and activities of the movement at Pax Christi’s gathering this Tuesday evening at 7 pm at 3387 Walnut Grove.
She is a 2012 graduate of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Jayanni is a native Memphian and currently serves as the communications and community organizer for the Memphis campaign.



For the past four years the United States has witnessed the growth of a movement to address poverty wages and unfair working conditions. This movement has been led primarily by workers of color in the fast food industry and home care and child care fields. Beginning in New York City, the Fight for $15 (and a union) Campaign for America’s working families has won a raise for 11 million workers across dozens of industries since its 2012 inception. Memphis fast food workers, inspired by watching thousands of people fight for economic justice, organized themselves in August 2013 under the banner of Memphis $15.

Memphis Home care workers joined about a year later.

While corporate giants like McDonald’s make billions of dollars each year, everyday people live in poverty. Even though there are many important arguments for raising the minimum wage, one overlooked fact is that a living wage is in service of a peaceful society. They believe poverty itself is violence. When millions go without the basic necessities in life, poverty is not just interconnected with violence, it is violence personified.

The working-poor and their allies use non-violent direct action, lobbying, and community organizing in order to disrupt the status quo and bring about economic and social change. Fight for $15 is many things, but it is also a peace mission that addresses individual acts of violence and also systemic violence produced by social institutions. Memphis workers in the Fight for $15 will join Pax Christi Memphis to talk about the campaign for $15/hr and union rights, share their personal stories of struggle and connect their fight to the type of broader change it will take to build a more peaceful society. 


Local poverty and Faithful Budget Campaign topics of discussion at March meeting
Terry Hash and her daughter Christine presented an eye opening look at poverty in the Memphis area and beyond at our March gathering. Armed with surprising facts and a wealth of data, the pair highlighted the struggle that thousands of our neighbors endure to navigate current economic conditions.

Christine, Manager of Social Enterprises and Community Engagement for Catholic Charities of West Tennessee, told the group that Memphis has the highest level of childhood poverty in the nation. She presented statistics reflecting the typical expenses for families of various sizes living in the Memphis metropolitan area, and showed the wide disparity in wages between the working poor and their more affluent suburban counterparts.

Memphis has a poverty rate of 29.8%. Child poverty is 46.9%, while poverty rates for people over age 65 are lowest at 14.5%. Poverty rates for African-Americans are 34.4%  and 45.5% of Latinos are also considered poor, while the poverty rate among non-Hispanic whites is 13.5% according to her information.
Christine highlighted a number of programs and initiatives  with which she is involved through Social Enterprises of Catholic Charities. Clients in these programs are paid a fair wage, taught valuable job skills and work on interpersonal skills  while building a work history that may help them transition into other employment.
 
 
Terry Hash, Pax Christi member and CRS Fair Trade Ambassador, followed with additional information on the US Economy and the Federal Budget. She presented pie charts documenting tax revenue and federal spending, providing a visual representation of where our tax dollars are budgeted.

In looking at the 2017 budget, Terry noted that the Pentagon budget is more than ten times that of the $52.7 billion budget proposed for diplomacy and international aid under the State Department.

Her figures also showed that in the decades since 1983, only upper-income families have made gains in wealth, and graphs showed that corporate taxes have lowered significantly (10.8% in 2015) while taxes on individuals and families represents 46.5% of total Federal Revenue.

Terry also provided her listeners with a document from the Faithful Budget Campaign, that consisted of a message to political leaders that included a statement, said to be rooted in sacred texts: Act with mercy and justice by serving the common good, robustly funding support for poor and vulnerable people, both a home and abroad, and exercising proper care and keeping of the earth.

The Faithful Budget Campaign is supported by a number of churches and faith based organizations, including Pax Christi USA. More information is available at www.faithfulbudget.org.

Pax Christi helps sponsor Conference
Pax Christi Memphis was proud to be among the sponsors of the 2016 Gandhi King Conference held at the UofM April 8th and 9th. Pictured here is Commercial Appeal Columnist David Waters (left) who moderated a discussion with Rev. F. Willis Johnson of Ferguson, MO and Rev. Mike Kinman provost of Christ Church Cathedral in St. Louis. Several Pax Christi members attended the conference.
 



Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 3, 2016
 
Local and national poverty issues to be addressed at March gathering

Christine Hash, Manager of Social Enterprises and Community Engagement for Catholic Charities of West Tennessee, will provide an overview of current poverty statistics at the local and national level.
Christine joined Catholic Charities of West Tennessee in July 2014 as Manager of Supportive Services for Parish Social Ministry. In May 2013, she graduated from the University of Memphis summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology
and Spanish. Christine was promoted to her current position, Manager of Social Enterprises and Community Engagement, in April 2015. Christine currently serves on the Social Enterprise Network Steering Committee of Catholic Charities USA. She also serves on the Board of Directors subcommittee for Parish Social Ministry of Catholic Charities of West Tennessee.
 
 
Among her varied responsibilities is oversight for the agency’s Bouquets of Hope ministry and three social enterprise initiatives - St. Bernard’s Biscuits (all natural dog treats that are baked and packaged by residents of Genesis House);  St. Bernard’s
Bandanas and Bowties (made by clients and partners of the agency); and Camp Love & Learn Notecards (blank notecards featuring original artwork from campers at Camp Love & Learn summer enrichment camp). She has presented about the social enterprises for Catholic Charities USA, the Diocese of Memphis, University of Memphis, and Rhodes College.


Terry Hash, Pax Christi member and CRS Fair Trade Ambassador, will follow with a presentation called Economics 101- The US economy and the federal budget - where does our money come from and where does it go? How does what we collect and how we spend affect the poverty rate? What questions do we need to ask?
Topics to be discussed include:
  • The Catholic Church’s view of the role of the economy
  • Economic changes that can affect the poverty rate (A     Faithful Budget)
  •  Economic actions we can take as individuals


Dr. Moinuddin brings Islamic concepts of God’s mercy to Pax Christi
In his presentation to those attending the February meeting of Pax Christi Memphis, Dr. Mohammed Moinuddin pointed out that of the 99 names for God recognized in the Islamic faith, the most important is “merciful.”
All 114 Chapters of the Qur’an begin with the phrase ‘In the name of Allah, the most beneficient, the most merciful’” Dr. Moinuddin said. “We are reminded of his mercy throughout.”
The former president of the Muslim Society of Memphis provided a fascinating lecture and slide presentation that explained the Islamic perspective of mercy.
Of the 99 names by which God is called, he prefers Rahma and Rahim, both of which relate to mercy, according to Dr. Moinuddin.
 
Msgr. Al Kirk (left) talks with Dr. Shamim Moinuddin and Dr. Mohammed Moinuddin.
Rahma is derived from a word for motherly love – all merciful, while Rahim, ever merciful, implies kindness and compassion. He taught that the two concepts “takes care of both believers and unbelievers.
“Mercy is divided into 100 parts,” Dr. Moinuddin said. “99 parts for God, one part for creation. One percent of our mercy we show each other, 99 percent is God’s mercy. God’s mercy is infinite.”
He discussed divine mercy and prophetic mercy, citing examples of each from the Qur’an. He called the sacred texts the “greatest mercy of God, because it is a guide to living a good life.”
Dr. Moinuddin also promoted the Is-
lamic Society of North America’s up-
coming conference to be held in Memphis at the Cook Convention Center April 9. Striving for Justice - The Prophetic Way of Life will deal with topics such as death, dying and end of life issues from a Christian, Jewish and Muslim perspective.

Gandhi-King Conference is April 8-9

The Gandhi King Conference is April 8-9 at the University of Memphis, Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change. Five keynote speakers are Mike Kinman, Executive Director of Episcopalians for Global Reconciliation, Maya Soetoro-Ng, professor of Peace Education, and Conflict Resolution, University of Hawaii,  Dr. Erica Chenoweth, Dean of Josef Korbel of International Studies and Rev. F. Willis Johnson, Wellspring Church in Ferguson, MO.
PBS host Tavis Smiley, author, publisher and advocate, will be the keynote speaker at the dinner on Saturday at the National Civil Rights Museum. Although the Conference is free, registration is required. A separate registration is also required for the Saturday night dinner.
Further information and registration: www.gandhikingconference.org.
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 2, 2016
 

Feb. 9th is FAT TUESDAY. Bring a Potluck Dish to share!
Ash Wednesday is February 10th and we enter the holy season of Lent. We’ll mark the eve of Ash Wednesday with a traditional Fat Tuesday Potluck dinner beginning at 6:30. Please join us and bring a dish to share if you are able. 
 
 


Dr. Mohammed Moinuddin to speak on mercy at February Pax Christi Gathering
The jubilee year of mercy as proclaimed by Pope Francis began on December 8, 2015, and the Holy Father has reminded us that it is intended to be lived all around the world and not exclusively in Rome.
Pax Christi Memphis is fortunate to hear a talk on mercy from the perspective of an esteemed community activist when Dr. Mohammed Moinuddin speaks at our regular meeting on February 9th.
Dr. Moinuddin has been actively involved in the Memphis community for more than 30 years. Dr. Moinuddin was the former president of the Muslim Society of Memphis (MSM). As president, Dr. Moinuddin addressed the educational needs of the community—promoting social activities, communicating with other religious groups, and providing financial assistance. After serving as president, Dr. Moinuddin became a Board Member for the MSM.
Dr. Moinuddin helped plan an Islamic Center and promoted educational activities in the community. He has participated in scheduling classes and lectures for children and adults in the Memphis community through the Islamic Center. Dr. Moinuddin has helped settle Muslim refugees in the Memphis area, which has included populations from Somalia, Sudan, Afghanistan, and other third world countries. Dr. Moinuddin and the Islamic Center provided the refugees with much needed financial help as well as social, moral, and religious assistance.
Dr. Moinuddin has been involved in outreach programs through interfaith activities, which have helped to improve relationships between the Jewish, Christian, Hindu, and Muslim communities. For example, Dr. Moinuddin was invited by the Church of the River three years ago to lecture on the “End of life decision making—perspectives from Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.” Since the 9/11 tragedy, Dr. Moinuddin has been actively providing information about Islam. The themes of Dr. Moinuddin’s lectures convey to the public that Muslims are a peaceful people and violence is not the norm in the Muslim community.
The relationships that Dr. Moinuddin has built have been instrumental in helping to prevent violence in the Muslim community. Dr. Moinuddin teaches at the Islamic school when requested, provides financial support to the school, and he assisted in creating a medical clinic that serves those in the population who cannot afford medical care.
Pax Christi meetings are open to the public and people of all faiths are welcomed.


Living the Year of Mercy in our daily lives
Msgr. Al Kirk offers two opportunities for Lenten Reflection
Lent takes much of its meaning from the great desert experiences of our traditions – that of Israel, of
Elijah, and especially that of Christ’s forty days there.
One of the great explosions of spiritual energy in the Church was created by men and women going out into the desert, seeking that solitude in which they could pray always. What does it mean for men and women in our own day to go out into the desert? How can our Lenten desert sojourn transform our lives?
On Ash Wednesday, Feb. 10th, Msgr. Al Kirk will lead a day of recollection, Into the Desert with Christ, that includes morning prayer, conference, Mass with distribution of ashes and lunch. The event is scheduled from 9 am–1 pm
at the Our Lady Queen of Peace Retreat Center in Dancyville. Register at www.olqpretreats.
Msgr. Kirk will also lead a Lenten series, Living the Year of  Mercy in Our Daily Lives scheduled for five weeks beginning Feb. 17th through March 16th. The sessions are offered twice daily every Wednesday; 10 am–noon, and 7–9 pm in the Marian Hall Conference Room at the Immaculate Conception Cathedral.
 
 

Jayanni Webster and Terry Hash
will discuss economic issues
facing workers at March meeting

Pax Christi’s March meeting will focus on the economy and the struggle of those forced to live on minimum wage.
Jayanni Webster will bring us information on the Fight for $15 movement, an effort to raise wages for over 64 million people in this country who remain in poverty while working at low wage jobs.
The group’s agenda supports a $15 per hour minimum wage, union rights, affordable child care for all Americans, quality long-term care for seniors and disabled people, the confronting of racism in our criminal justice system, an end to voter suppression and common sense immigration reform.
The Fight for $15 movement will seek to influence the 2016 elections and urge elected officials to listen to everyday working parents.
Terry Hash will also share remarks from a presentation she is preparing for the “Moving the Needle” Workshop sponsored by Catholic Charities. Her focus will be on the economy and how it affects those living in poverty.
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 1, 2016

Pax Christi Memphis helps usher in Year of Mercy
The December meeting date for Pax Christi Memphis fell on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, the day that officially began the Year of Mercy as proclaimed by Pope Francis. The significance of this time was recognized in a discussion led by Msgr. Albert Kirk on the topic of God’s Mercy.
The discussion centered around five goals for the year of mercy as outlined by Msgr. Kirk and included understanding and receiving God’s mercy, becoming a person of mercy, becoming a church of mercy and creating a culture of mercy.
He encouraged his listeners
to let God’s mercy affect the choices they make in the coming year, and suggested that mercy be received in thanksgiving and returned with acts of mercy shown toward others.
Msgr. Kirk urged Pax Christi members, “... to let the Holy Spirit give us a practice of mercy,” and said some ways to practice mercy were by controlling the tongue, avoiding gossip and engaging in constructive dialogue.
He said we could become people of mercy by following Romans 12:14 – Bless your persecutors; never curse them, bless them. 
 
 





Pope's World Peace Day message will be discussed at January gathering
At our first gathering for the new year, Jerry Bettice will provide a short reflection and lead our group in a discussion of the Pope’s message for the 2016 World Day of Peace, with focus on how we can spread and activate the message of peace for the local church and the world around us.
“Sadly, war and terrorism, accompanied by kidnapping, ethnic or religious persecution and the misuse of power, marked the past year from start to finish,” the Pope said in his opening remarks. “In many parts of the world, these have became so common as to constitute a real ‘third world war fought piecemeal.’
Yet some events of the year now ending inspire me, in looking ahead to the new year, to encourage everyone not to lose hope in our human ability to conquer evil and to combat resignation and indifference. They demonstrate our capacity to show solidarity and to rise above self-interest, apathy and indifference in the face of critical situations.”
Pope Francis’ message is one of trust and hope in the pursuit of justice and peace. He calls peace both God’s gift and a human achievement, and stresses that this gift is entrusted to all men and women who are called to attain it.
Introductory paragraphs to the Holy Father’s message are at the bottom of this page, and his entire message may be accessed by clicking here.

Presentation by Sharon and David Hoover
offered as possible program for August 2016

Many of our members remember the excellent play based on Thomas Merton and Dorothy Day presented at St. Patrick Church by Sharon and David Hoover of Inscape Ministries in July of 2014.
The New Mexico actors have contacted us with an offer to stage another production when they visit our area this summer – and since they will be in Tennessee for a family wedding we are offered the bonus of no travel expenses.
Sharon Hoover mentioned two new projects – St. Francis of Assisi: Face to Face or Storytelling for Peace.
“Storytelling for Peace is a time of telling wisdom stories drawn from interfaith traditions geared toward awakening and transformation with a trajectory towards a way of love and nonviolence,” she explained. “A story is told, followed by a short time of silent reflection, and then sharing and teaching around the themes that have been evoked.”
Another play, Conversations with Dorothy Day, is an interactive piece, different from the previous play on Merton and Day.
We will be discussing the exciting possibilities offered by these talented actors as our plans for the year progress.


It is that time of the year when we encourage your financial support for our local peacemaking efforts.
You may bring your donation for Pax Christi Memphis
to the next meeting on January 12 or mail it to:
Pax Christi Memphis
4043 Allison Avenue • Memphis, TN 38122-3804.
Thank you for your continuing support.
Jerry Bettice. Treasurer, PCM


Moinuddin featured speaker for February
Dr. Mohammed Moinuddin will be our guest at next month’s meeting on Feb. 9th. He has been actively involved in the Memphis community for more than 30 years, and was the former president of the Muslim Society of Memphis (MSM). As president, Dr. Moinuddin addressed the educational needs of the community – promoting social activities, communicating with other religious groups,
and providing financial assistance. Dr. Moinuddin has been involved in outreach programs through interfaith activities, which have helped to improve relationships between the Jewish, Christian, Hindu, and Muslim communities. Please watch for more information in our newsletter.
 
 

Introduction of the Pope's message for the World Day of Peace 2016

For reflection at our January 12th Gatering

1. God is not indifferent! God cares about mankind! God does not abandon us! At the beginning of the New Year, I would like to share not only this profound conviction but also my cordial good wishes for prosperity, peace and the fulfilment of the hopes of every man and every woman, every family, people and nation throughout the world, including all Heads of State and Government and all religious leaders. We continue to trust that 2016 will see us all firmly and confidently engaged, on different levels, in the pursuit of justice and peace. Peace is both God’s gift and a human achievement. As a gift of God, it is entrusted to all men and women, who are called to attain it.
Maintaining our reasons for hope
2. Sadly, war and terrorism, accompanied by kidnapping, ethnic or religious persecution and the misuse of power, marked the past year from start to finish. In many parts of the world, these have became so common as to constitute a real “third world war fought piecemeal”. Yet some events of the year now ending inspire me, in looking ahead to the new year, to encourage everyone not to lose hope in our human ability to conquer evil and to combat resignation and indifference. They demonstrate our capacity to show solidarity and to rise above self-interest, apathy and indifference in the face of critical situations.
Here I would mention the efforts to bring world leaders together at COP21 in the search for new ways to confront climate change and to protect the earth, our common home. We can also think of two earlier global events: the Addis Ababa Summit for funding sustainable development worldwide and the adoption of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, aimed at ensuring a more dignified standard of living for all the world’s peoples, especially the poor, by that year.
For the Church, 2015 was a special year, since it marked the fiftieth anniversary of two documents of the Second Vatican Council which eloquently expressed her sense of solidarity with the world. Pope John XXIII, at the beginning of the Council, wanted to open wide the windows of the Church and to improve her communication with the world. The two documents, Nostra Aetate and Gaudium et Spes, are emblematic of the new relationship of dialogue, solidarity and accompaniment which the Church sought to awaken within the human family. In the Declaration Nostra Aetate, the Church expressed her openness to dialogue with non-Christian religions. In the Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, based on a recognition that “the joys and hopes, the grief and anguish of the people of our time, especially of those who are poor or afflicted, are the joys and hopes, the grief and anguish of the followers of Christ as well”,[1] the Church proposed to enter into dialogue with the entire human family about the problems of our world, as a sign of solidarity, respect and affection.[2]
Along these same lines, with the present Jubilee of Mercy I want to invite the Church to pray and work so that every Christian will have a humble and compassionate heart, one capable of proclaiming and witnessing to mercy. It is my hope that all of us will learn to “forgive and give”, to become more open “to those living on the outermost fringes of society - fringes which modern society itself creates”, and to refuse to fall into “a humiliating indifference or a monotonous routine which prevents us from discovering what is new! Let us ward off destructive cynicism!”[3]
There are many good reasons to believe in mankind’s capacity to act together in solidarity and, on the basis of our interconnection and interdependence, to demonstrate concern for the more vulnerable of our brothers and sisters and for the protection of the common good. This attitude of mutual responsibility is rooted in our fundamental vocation to fraternity and a life in common. Personal dignity and interpersonal relationships are what constitute us as human beings whom God willed to create in his own image and likeness. As creatures endowed with inalienable dignity, we are related to all our brothers and sisters, for whom we are responsible and with whom we act in solidarity. Lacking this relationship, we would be less human. We see, then, how indifference represents a menace to the human family. As we approach a new year, I would ask everyone to take stock of this reality, in order to overcome indifference and to win peace.
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 10, 2015

Msgr. Albert Kirk to discuss "Understanding God's Mercy"
Last April Pope Francis announced a Holy Year of Mercy, commencing on Dec. 8, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, and the 50th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council.
“Let us not forget that God forgives and God forgives always,” Francis said in his announcement. “Let us never tire of asking for forgiveness.”
When Pax Christi gathers on Dec. 8, Msgr. Albert Kirk will lead us in a discussion on the topic of mercy.
“I will facilitate conversation around these questions:” Fr. Kirk said. “How do we understand God’s mercy? How do we receive it more fully? How do I become a person of mercy? How do we become a people of mercy?”
Please join us and bring a friend to take advantage of this special opportunity to begin this jubilee year.
 
 
Pot Luck dinner to become regular feature
Pax Christi members so enjoyed breaking bread together at the November meeting that the group took an informal vote to bring pot luck dishes to our future gatherings.
Expressing appreciation for the wonderful kitchen and dining facilities at the Quaker Meetinghouse, members agreed that we were afforded a unique opportunity to share a monthly meal. For those that are able, please bring a dish to share at 6:30 on Tuesday, Dec. 8. Clean-up will be a joint effort after an enjoyable dinner and engaging conversation.



Immigration Reform Discussed in November
Representatives from Communities United in One Voice updated Pax Christi Memphis members on the issues and challenges facing the local group working toward immigration reform.
Veronica Marquez related some of her personal history as an immigrant from Mexico. A bad economy, due in part she believed to the North American Free Trade Agreement, prompted her family’s move to the US in 1994. Finding life difficult here as well, they were forced to return to Mexico in 1996, but returned to the US in 1999, this time with improved language skills, but still facing many challenges. Her family experienced firsthand many abuses and failings of the US immigration policies, including the incarceration of the family breadwinner.
Since then, Veronica says she has become active in efforts to improve the immigrant experience, participating in a Washington, DC march and conducting workshops to inform people and work for reform.
Dr. José Davila, associate professor of mechanical engineering at Christian Brothers University, added that many workshops had been conducted through churches, and discussed with members the possibility of expanded interaction with local Catholic congregations. It was pointed out that American Bishops have been vocal supporters of immigration reform.
Both presenters spoke of tie-ins with Secure Community initiatives, but noted that working with law enforcement agencies at every level sometimes proved difficult, citing instances where people were detained and held for extended periods without just cause, trying to find grounds for deportation.
“Just as they were about to be released,” Dr. Davila said, “ICE (US Immigration and Customs Enforcement) would say ‘hold them for another day,’ the opposite of what was intended.”
Ms. Marquez said that even with possession of a drivers license and documentation, fear remains within her and the entire immigrant community.
ADDITIONAL MEETING HIGHLIGHTS
Judy and Jerry Bettice discussed their participation in the 2015 Call to Action Conference held mid-November in Milwaukee. Mentioning talks by Thomas P. Doyle, Patricia Fresen, Joan Chittister and others, the Bettices said they hoped to screen videos from the conference in their home during the weeks ahead.
Monica Juma spoke about nonviolence training with Frida Berrigan and offered encouraging news on increased participation and interest among the 20-30 age group.
Randy Gambell talked about his experience with the Alternatives to Violence workshop held recently at the Quaker Meetinghouse.

Faith in Memphis panel addresses refugee issue
Readers of The Commercial Appeal might have noticed David Water’s Faith in Memphis panel dealing with the Syrian Refugee Crisis in their Nov. 29 edition. Many so-called “Christian Voices” in our country have expressed fears related to the acceptance of these refugees within our borders due to the possibility of terrorists among their ranks – those who might slip through the vetting process. Here are some opinions by our friends and a member of Pax Christi who did not make the print issue, but whose remarks were featured in the digital edition.
Janice Vanderhaar • Pax Christi Memphis
Memphis is blessed with remarkable religious diversity and has welcomed refugees for many years. Let us be a beacon of light to all the people of our state and around our nation, that we are a people grounded in our faith who are not afraid and who are willing to declare Memphis a safe zone for Syrian refugees. Our government has sufficient ways to vet those who we hope will come live with us. Let us be the “good Samaritans” living on the banks of the Mississippi.
Ron McDonald • Memphis Friends Meeting (Quaker)
Memphis has become a melting pot of people. We’re not only a most generous city, we are also a sanctuary city for many refugees. Every time we accept the stranger, our lives get richer. We are people of love, and even though we get scared once in a while, love calls us to open our homeland. It’s worth the risk.
Sonia Walker • First Congregational Church
‘All’ is a lethal word when used pejoratively:  all children, all Christians, all Japanese, all Jews, all men, all Muslims, all women, all WASPs, all Africans, all Americans. Like trillions of snowflakes in one winter season, we’re created and valued uniquely by The Divine. Sorting, naming and pricing people are artificial, human systems.
Val Handwerker • Immaculate Conception
The Christian Scriptures broaden who the neighbor is.  In Jesus’ famous parable, the Good Samaritan takes a risk when he reaches out to rescue the beaten-up man—one who saw the Samaritan as an enemy.  It may entail some risk for us to welcome Syrian refugees, although it seems improbable that a terrorist would go through an eighteen month clearance process. We should be willing to take that risk to keep true to our core values. From the Memphis Commercial Appeal.
Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 9, 2015

Pax Christi Memphis to march in solidarity with Fight for $15 movement

Potluck dinner to follow parade
Pax Christi Memphis will participate in the Memphis Fight for $15 parade on Tuesday, November 10, to show our support for raising the minimum wage to a living wage and to obtain union rights. This action is one of over 270 taking place around the nation. The parade is gathering at 4pm at St. Patrick’s Church, and will march to City Hall at 4:30. There will be a rally with supporters and elected officials that will end at 5:45pm. Vans will be available to take those that cannot walk to and from the rally.
 
 
In addition to the parade, there are other Fight for $15 activities beginning at 6am and concluding with the parade. All the activities are well planned and permits have been obtained. The event organizer, Jayanni Webster is very excited about our participation. We will be carrying our Pax Christi Memphis banner. For more details visit www.showme15.org.
After the parade, we will head to our Pax Christi meeting place, the Quaker Meetinghouse at 3387 Walnut Grove for a potluck dinner. We will discuss the day’s events and prepare for our monthly meeting. All are welcome to join us.
Please contact Terry Hash at terez58@aol.com or 901-849-0983 if you are attending the parade and potluck or if you need transportation.

“The current federal minimum wage fails “to provide sufficient resources for individuals to form and support families ... a full-year, full-time worker making the minimum wage does not make enough money to raise a child free from poverty. Because the minimum wage is a static number and does not change, each year it becomes more difficult for workers making the minimum wage to survive.”
Additionally, while some minimum wage workers are teenagers, research suggests as much as 25% of workers who would benefit from a minimum wage increase are parents. Workers deserve a just wage that allows them to live in dignity, form and support families, and contribute to the common good.”

Archbishop Thomas Wenski of Miami, chairman of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, and Fr. Larry Snyder, president of Catholic Charities USA




Familiar face graces magazine cover
The October edition of West Tennessee Faith magazine featured a cover photo of someone familiar to Pax Christi, members of St. Patrick parish and to people all over Memphis who frequent events related to civil rights and social justice. Our own Randell Gamble was the subject of an interview by Jenny Sharpe.
Randy talked about growing up in Oakland, CA, his Navy career and the struggles he has faced since settling in
this area thirty years ago. He discusses his introduction to Catholicism and how it led to the various ministries and movements in which he has become involved. He reveals how his faith has grown throughout the years and the tremendous part it has played in his pursuit of justice and racial reconciliation.
To read the complete interview, visit the magazine website or pick up a copy at your local parish or at the diocesan office.


Dialogue with local bishop continues on nuclear deterrence / Iran deal
At the October 13th meeting of Pax Christi Memphis, Jerry Bettice updated members on the ongoing conversation he and Msgr. Al Kirk have engaged in with Bishop Terry Steib, leader of the Catholic Diocese of West Tennessee, regarding Pope Francis’ support of the “Iran Deal” and the whole question of nuclear weapons.
“Two months ago we asked the Bishop to make this a part of his teaching,” Jerry explained, “and he asked for a written expression of what we asked him to teach.”
Since then, Jerry and Msgr. Kirk have crafted a number of points, discussing the document with the PC Memphis membership. They pointed out that voices of Catholic leadership have not been silent on the whole issue of the possession, proliferation and use of nuclear armaments.
Information to be reviewed by Bishop Steib includes quotes from at least four popes, the US Council of Bishops and the first bishop of Memphis, Carroll Dozier, who reminded us that peace is both gift and task.
Jerry told members that activists and religious including Joan Chittister, Tom Cordaro, Megan McKenna and Eileen Egan have written various US Bishops regarding deterrence. He pointed out that the deterrence is in reality counterproductive and stated that many Catholics support nuclear weapons out of a sense of fear.
Possible actions the Bishop could take include his drafting a letter to pastors in the Memphis Diocese, the writing of a column on the topic and consultation with two other Tennessee Bishops, particularly in regard to the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, part of the national laboratory built to facilitate the Manhattan Project for the purpose of enriching uranium for the first atomic bombs built to destroy Nagasaki and Hiroshima in 1945.


Pax Christi Memphis needs prayers and new ideas to chart course for future
How Pax Christi Memphis will continue to be a local force for peacemaking in coming years has been a frequent topic for discussion for the past several months. Leaders Terry Hash and Janice Vanderhaar will relinquish responsibility for planning meetings, and members will need to step up to fill their roles along with other duties as well.
A process has been initiated to review documents from our previous day of discernment, and members are asked to prayerfully consider their involvement in our movement and to submit ideas relevant to remaining an effective voice to espouse the message of Christian peace in our community.
Our rich history demonstrates our commitment to peace and nonviolence, and we must remain dedicated to the objectives of our movement.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 8, 2015


Campaign Nonviolence Memphis wraps up week of action
Several Pax Christi Memphis members participated in the planning of CNV’s Week of Action September 20-27. The local group joined with others across the country in prayer vigils and events aimed at creating a culture of peace, free from war, poverty and the destruction of the earth. Our October meeting will feature a review of 11 events CNV planned and/or participated in, and describe the impact their actions had upon the community. A prayer vigil at the National Civil Rights Museum featured a number of speakers from various faith communities to begin the week. Pictured is Monica Juma, who welcomed those who attended the vigil.


PC Memphis to present bishop with statement on “Iran Deal” & nuclear threat
On September 28, Fr. Al Kirk and Jerry Bettice met with our Bishop Terry Steib to discuss Pax Christi Memphis’s concern about the “Iran deal” and Catholic teaching on the possession of nuclear weapons and the threats they pose for our world. This meeting was a follow-up to the letter sent to the bishop after the August meeting in which we featured the 70th anniversary of the atomic bomb attacks on Japan. The bishop asked for a written statement that expresses the concerns and possibilities put forth in the meeting. On October 13, at our meeting of Pax Christi Memphis, Jerry will present a draft of the document for feedback from the membership with a view of presenting a more complete view of what we hope he can do in conveying Catholic teaching to the local church of the Diocese of Memphis.Opportunities for involvement abound at upcoming events

Opportunities for involvement abound at upcoming events

October 10,
11:30 am-4:15 pm, Come & See: Sharing Love Giving Voice. St. Louis Church, 203 White Station, The first of a series addressing the role of citizen from a Catholic perspective. Free event open to the public, but reservations are required (call 901-722-4794 or visit http://ccwtnpsm10-10-15.eventbrite.com.) Lunch will be provided. Presented by Catholic Charities of West Tennessee.
October 11, Noon-3 pm, Tapas & Tamales: A Fun-filled Fiesta Fundraiser, Wiseacre Brewery, 2783 Broad Ave. Taste great Latin themed appetizers from organizations across Memphis and beer from Wiseacre Brewery. Vote for the best. Proceeds benefit The Workers Interfaith Network, The Midsouth Peace & Justice Center, Tennesseans for Fair Taxation, Grow Memphis and the Memphis Gay & Lesbian Community Center.
October 23-25, Alternatives to Violence Workshop, Quaker Meetinghouse, resulting from the work that Mahal Burr and Evan John Ross Morrison are doing at Bridges and Jail East with Memphis youth. Mahal will be co-facilitating the workshop to train AVP facilitators who would like to take the workshop into the Memphis jail. Participants are not required, however,  to work in the prison system, but organizers hope to build a core team of trainers. The workshop will run approximately 19 hours over the weekend. For more information, or to register, visit: https://www.facebook.com/groups/memphisavp/
October 30, 7:30 pm, Mend the Gap, Heal the Divides. An Evening with Sister Simone Campbell, SSS. First Congregational Church, Sponsored by The Gerard A. Vanderhaar Symposium and the CBU School of Arts. Fresh off her latest Nuns on the Bus tour in answer to Pope Francis’s call that “a healthy politics is sorely needed,” Sister Simone Campbell, SSS, visits Memphis to share the stories she’s gathered from America’s heartland where she connected with those who have been marginalized by our nation’s politics. In her talk she will look to amplify the concerns of individuals, families, and communities in places dealing with injustice, poverty, and division.
November 7, 8:30 am-2:30 pm, Envisioning a Cleaner, Healthier Environment: A Grassroots Community Conference. The Sierra Club and the University of Memphis are once again co-sponsoring the biggest grassroots environmental conference in the Mid-South. This conference is designed especially for the average person-next-door, and will feature workshops of interest to community residents concerned about various environmental issues, college students,  members of church congregations, and numerous other groups and sectors of the community. For more information visit: https://memphisejconference.wordpress.com/last-years-conference/.

Nuns on the Bus visits Memphis
Sister Simone to return Oct. 30

Several Pax Christi members were on hand to greet Sister Simone Campbell and the “Nuns on the Bus” when they visited Memphis on Sept. 14th. At a town hall meeting held at Immaculate Conception, the sisters asked participants about issues of poverty, inequality and other social concerns. They will take the stories they collected on the tour and present them to congress later this year.
Sister Simone will return to Memphis on October 30 to speak at First Congregational Church at an event sponsored by the Vanderhaar Symposium and Christian Brothers University.
 
 
Members and guests share ways to achieve inner peace through daily practice
PC Memphis welcomed several guests to our September member, including members of local Buddhist communities, to discuss daily spiritual practices that help us achieve inner peace, thus making us more effective peacemakers. After a short period of silent meditation, those gathered shared practices that included chanting, meditation, rote prayer, centering prayer, spiritual reading and other methods. Several members commented that they benefited from learning about the diverse spiritual practices described during this time of sharing.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 7, 2015

August meeting presents study of the past and vision for the future
Opening with a prayer calling for global disarmament of nuclear weapons as expressed decades ago by the Catholic church, Pax Christi Memphis marked the 70th Anniversary of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings at the August 11th gathering. Prayers included the words of Pope John XXIII, Pope Paul VI, Pope John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI, the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops and Archbishop Dominique Mamberti. Members responded to each petition in the spirit of the great prophet Isaiah: “May we pray to remember our call from Christ to be makers of peace and to become the children of God.”
Jerry Bettice presented slides, handouts and graphic posters detailing the development of nuclear weapons and the decision to use them toward the end of World War II. He described the immediate impact and many of the after-effects the bombings had on their targets and the surrounding area, including the death, suffering and lingering consequences of 200 kinds of radioactive isotopes and phenomena such as black rain.

His presentation included appeals for peace from Pope John Paul II and others. He read from Hiroshima Mayor Matsui Kazumi’s Peace Declaration that begins with these words: “In our town, we had the warmth of family life, the deep human bonds of community, festivals heralding each season, traditional culture and buildings passed down through history, as well as riversides where children played.
“At 8:15 a.m., Aug. 6, 1945, all of that was destroyed by a single atomic bomb. Below the mushroom cloud, a charred mother and child embraced, countless corpses floated in rivers, and buildings burned to the ground. Tens of thousands were burned in those flames. By year’s end, 140,000 irreplaceable lives had been taken.”
Direct action in the form of a letter to our Diocesan Bishop urging him to put the issue of nuclear weapons and the recent US agreement with Iran before the Catholics of West Tennessee was proposed near the end of the presentation. Members in attendance signed the letter and plans are underway to present the document to Bishop Steib.

Just back from the Campaign Nonviolence National Conference in Santa Fe and Los Alamos, Monica Juma related her experiences marching to and participating in two peace vigils, and listening to the many speakers at the events, including John Dear, Kit Evans-Ford, Erica Chenoweth, Kathy Kelly, Jim Lawson and many others. She was especially impressed with the non-violence training led by Ken Butigan, and brought back a large poster created by the “Memphis Team” as part of an exercise during the training. The poster illustrated what a nonviolent Memphis might look like ten years from now.
 
 
The artists’ vision included a pyramid converted to a Center for Nonviolence, a gun-free zone, interfaith groups promoting nonviolence with collective wisdom and many other creative ideas to form Memphis into a “soul healing, spirit lifting city with a nonviolent river flowing through.”
Monica’s enthusiasm will serve as a springboard as the local arm of Campaign Nonviolence plans actions this month.

September program will focus on personal practice for inner peace
In Chapter Three of his book The Nonviolent Life, John Dear writes: Peacemakers throughout history testify to need for quiet meditation if we are to live the nonviolent life of peace. The story of the nonviolent Jesus, according to Luke’s account, begins with him sitting in silent prayer by the Jordan River. In that quiet time of contemplative listening and opening to the Spirit of peace, he heard that he was God’s beloved, In this sacred space, he was able to take that message to heart, to claim that truth as the core of his identity. Like the nonviolent Jesus, we too need to sit still in silent meditation and open our hearts and minds to the Holy Spirit of peace and let the God of peace call us God’s beloved.
Do you have a daily spiritual practice that helps you toward inner peace? Whether it is meditation, rote prayer, centering prayer, scripture reading or just quiet contemplation, peacemakers are urged to adopt a practice that brings peace to their soul. What works for you? Are you able to find solitude in your daily environment?
Henri Nouwen writes: It is in solitude that compassionate solidarity grows. In solitude we realize that nothing human is alien to us, that the roots of all conflict, war, injustice, cruelty, hatred, jealousy and envy are deeply anchored in our own heart. In solitude our heart of stone can be turned into a heart of flesh, a rebellious heart into a contrite heart, and a closed heart into a heart that can open itself to all suffering people in a gesture of solidarity.
A portion of our September meeting will include a discussion of daily spiritual practices to make us more effective peacemakers. Please join us for an evening of sharing.

UPCOMING EVENTS
Sept. 7 PCMemphis will host an information table at the Thirteenth Annual Faith and Labor Picnic on Labor Day, Monday, September 7 from 11-2pm. Tickets are $12 and includes all food, beverages and entertainment. Proceeds benefit WIN - Workers Interfaith Network. Come on out and support labor on Labor Day!
Sept. 25-27 – PCMemphis will also have an information booth along with Campaign Nonviolence at the Frayser Block Party for Peace, Fri-Sun., Sept. 25-27. We would like to man our booth the whole time the Block Party is going on so we need plenty of volunteers. Please consider coming to support the Frayser neighborhood and to share your interest in PC and CNV to all that attend. Please email Terry at terez58@aol.com if you would like to help
Sept. 27 - The Father McCarthy Gospel Nonviolence study group will meet on Sunday, Sept. 27 from 3-5pm at the home of Yvonne Fournier, 5051 Barry Rd. Prior attendance is not required and all are welcome. Please call Yvonne for more info – 212-3030.
October 30-31 – Sr. Simone Campbell will return to Memphis

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 6, 2015

Dr. Paul Haught calls Laudato si “a Prayer for the earth” at July meeting
Dr. Paul Haught, Vice President of Academics and Student Life at Christian Brothers University, brought Pax Christi Members a unique philosophical perspective to the discussion around Pope Francis’s Encyclical Laudato si at our July 14th meeting. Haught, who is a tenured professor in the Department of Religion and Philosophy has centered much of his academic training around applied ethics and environmental philosophy and has written on topics related to virtue ethics and environmental justice.
After a careful study of the Pope’s Encyclical, Haught called the document, “… a prayer for our earth,” and told those gathered that his approach would be from a perspective of environmental ethics in a culture of virtue, although Laudato si should be read from multiple vantage points. He asked the group to consider the possibility and significance of a moral relationship with nature, and broke down the discussion into eight major themes.
1. Extensionism: Laudato si can be read as an argument for extending moral considerability to the non-human world. He stressed the value of looking beyond the human person and recognizing the incalculable value of certain species being destroyed. This approach demands farsightedness and the realization that the impact extends beyond just soil, water and air.
 
2. We’re in an environmental crisis: Pope Francis asserts that the crisis in anthropogenic - that collectively humans are the cause of the damage. We are beyond the tipping point and thousands of species can no longer give glory to God by their very existence.
3. Attitudes of Dominance and Indifference: Francis enjoins us to become sensitive to our indifference to things of value and to our domination nature, the poor, the vulnerable and ourselves via our technology and economic habits. Haught said the Pope asserts that we are dominated by our technologies and business interests, and that we indifferently accept this domination.
4. Anthropocentrism: Laudato si is legitimately extensionist, but human beings appear to hold greater value than other creatures. The Pope, he pointed out, says that the ultimate purpose of creation is not found in us.
5. Political Economy: Laudato si advocates a political economy that prioritizes social obligations to the world’s poorest. He stated that the earth is our common home and that work related to the climate should be a common goal, citing rights to clean water as an example.
6. Virtue: To achieve a shift toward the worldview of Laudato si we need to cultivate the appropriate virtues. Pope Francis points to the spirit of life that dwells in every living creature and calls us to enter in a relationship that includes humility, tenderness and compassion.
7. Integral Ecology: That worldview is expressed in terms of a philosophy of integral ecology - it must integrate questions of justice. Francis calls for openness to categories which transcend the language of math and biology – that take us to the heart of what it means to be human.
8. Transcendence: The worldview of integral ecology gains its full meaning within a theological framework in which humanity is called to care for the dignity of all persons and the intrinsic worth of all creation. This theme stresses that we are not creators. Our moral responsibility comes from God. Science and religion can enter into an intense dialogue. Human beings will always try to impose their own laws on reality if they don’t accept the concept of a creator.

August meeting will feature Hiroshima/Nagasaki remembrance

At the August 11th Meeting, Judy and Jerry Bettice will lead a special remembrance of the 70th Anniversary of the bombings of the two Japanese cities during the waning days of World War II. Observance of this occasion comes at a time when we remain on hair trigger alert and the risks posed by nuclear weapons is still unacceptably high.
Monica Juma will also present a report from the Campaign Nonviolence Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Monica will provide details on plans for September actions including a vigil at the National Civil Rights Museum on the 20th, and the Frayser Block Party for Peace, Sept. 25th - 27th.
The Block Party is billed as a family event to promote peace, empowerment and opportunity in Memphis and surrounding communities.


UPCOMING EVENTS
Aug. 16 – “Save Mother Earth and Save the Child” hosted by the Viswayogi Foundation and Unity Church of Practical Christianity. The event’s mission is to bring all faith traditions together as ONE in peace and harmony. 3:30 pm. 9228 Walnut Grove in Cordova.
Project Night Night -
Pax Christi members are encouraged to bring new or gently used stuffed animals, books, and security blankets to put in canvas bags that will be donated to the Memphis Salvation Army Women and Children Homeless Shelter. If you would like to help, please bring any of these donated items to the next Pax Christi meeting on August 11. For more info visit: www.projectnightnight.org/memphis.html.
Sept. 7 –
Faith and Labor Picnic. Volunteers needed to work a Pax Christi table.
Sept. 25-27 – Frayser Block Party for Peace (PCM will be a sponsor)
October 30-31 – Sr. Simone Campbell will return to Memphis

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 6, 2015

Erica Thomas speaks on income disparity & state fiscal decisions
A presentation by Erica Thomas at the June 9 meeting brought a very sobering look at the future of Tennessee with the new amendment banning a state income tax. Erica, Manager/Editor at the COPPER Speaks Newspaper (Coalition for the Organizational Protection of People and Equal Rights) spoke on “Revenue Shortfalls and the Unspoken Consequences of Tennessee’s Fiscal Decisions.” Some salient points included:
 
  • review of the loss of the vote to prevent Amendment 3 from becoming part of the Tennessee Constitution (no income tax, no payroll tax for municipalities)
  • states around TN have income tax; there is a cross border drain to the 8 surrounding states due to lower sales taxes
  • there was an exercise to dramatize the difference between having income tax and not having one; low income people bear the greater burden of supporting Tennessee
  • inevitably there will be defaults and the State will run out of money for necessary programs
  • video of the TED talk on YOU TUBE; Nick Hanauer: the rich do not create jobs; it’s the consumers who do that
  • Tennesseans for Fair Taxation (TFT) will meet on July 25 in Jackson,TN
  • TFT will have training sessions in August, 27th – 30th
  • Erica can make this presentation to parish groups or at other meetings
If you missed the presentation and would like to see it, Erica can send you the PDF - her email is ericasmessage@gmail.com.

Also at the June meeting, Deacon Henry Littleton gave an update on the efforts toward a Civilian Review Board for Memphis as advocated by the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center.

July meeting will focus on Papal Environmental Encyclial, Laudato Si
Our next meeting is Tuesday, July 14. We will be discussing the Pope’s encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si. This is a very important document and has gathered a lot of attention and support and also dissent in both Catholic and non-Catholic circles. This is a great opportunity to learn what is in the encyclical so we can carry his message throughout the community. The encyclical itself is 192 pages long and can be viewed at http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html.

We will be basing our discussion on the Vatican’s overview and summary (12 pages) that can be viewed at http://www.news.va/en/news/overview-of-the-encyclical-laudato-si.

We hope everyone will be able to at least read the summary before the meeting so we can have a lively and informative discussion. Our discussion questions will be taken from the reader’s guide promoted by PCUSA  http://ncronline.org/blogs/faith-and-justice/readers-guide-laudato-siand will include a discussion of  personal steps we can each take to be good stewards of creation in our own circle of influence. This is a great follow up to our presentation in March by Rita Harris- come and join us!


 


Several members of Pax Christi Memphis and our friends celebrated birthdays last month. Pictured above at a party hosted by Janice Vanderhaar and Ed Wallin are Judy Bettice, Margie Miller, Carole Blackburn, Ray Berthiaume and Carol Carson.
 

UPCOMING EVENTS
August 2 - Father McCarthy DVD/discussion study group meeting is Sunday, August 2, 3-5PM at the home of Yvonne Fournier,  5051 Barry Rd. Memphis. Please contact Yvonne for more information- yfournier@yfournier.com or 212-3030. All are welcome
August 4-9 – CNV Conference in Santa Fe NM with a PCUSA program on August 6
Sept. 25-27 – Frayser Block Party for Peace (PCM will be a sponsor)
October 30-31 – Sr. Simone Campbell will return to Memphis
Pax Christi Memphis represented in Honduras
Paul Crum is back safely from his fourth mission trip to Trujillo, Honduras and thanks all of his friends for their prayers and support. Pictured here with the hotel “Pirate” who was dressed in one of the t-shirts Paul designed for the mission team, Paul is wearing a Pax Christi t-shirt as he often does while in Honduras. “I try to promote our group among the other missionaries,” he said, “and I always let the Honduran people know we are on a mission of peace.” Bendiciones de la paz.
 

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 4, 2015

May 12th Meeting offers opportunity for a conversation in the process of group discernment
During the April meeting our group reflected on the gifts we see in our Pax Christi community. Members were given an assignment to “discern the gifts that we see – without attaching any persons’ names to these gifts, talents, skills, and so on.”
During the May meeting, our members shared with the group the gifts they recognized that could be brought in the service of Gospel nonviolence and peacemaking. They included:
  • wisdom and inspiration
  • a spirit of welcome
  • mutual support for persons and action
  • sharing resource, knowledge and insight--teaching
  • creative planning
  • communication by phone, visits and electronic media
  • vision for taking action
  • writing and speaking skills
  • clarity in speaking to adversity
  • providing transportation to members for meetings
  • calling the group to prayer
  • contemplative spirit
  • fidelity in getting things done
  • bridge building and cultivating relationships within and
  • outside the local group, especially collaboration with the Vanderhaar Symposium and Campaign NonViolence
From a discussion of the gifts articulated, the group considered specific roles in Pax Christi Memphis relevant to these gifts – roles that would benefit the group and the larger community we serve:
  • hospitality and welcoming
  • connecting PCM to the wider church for peace and justice
  • representing PCM outside the local group
  • visioning for our mission and outreach
  • calling us to focus on the nonviolent Jesus
  • study in preparation for meetings, events and personal growth
  • fund raising and stewardship
  • organizing and planning
  • promoting nonviolence training
  • fostering reconciliation
  • technical support and artistic expression related to our mission
  • gathering people for the work of peace and justice
  • networking with youth and other Christians and other faiths
  • implementing and facilitating nonviolence training
  • hosting persons with resources and outlooks that nourish us in our mission
Pax Christi Memphis will continue the discussion with the goal of discerning new leadership roles and responsibilities for our members.

 


May 1 - Pax Christi members participated in a Eucharistic celebration at the Martin de Porres Shrine to honor St. Joseph the Worker

May 16 - Pax Christi members joined a public Intercessory Prayer Chain at the headquarters of the Shelby County Schools. The event was organized by Mt. Pleasant M.B. Church and FFUN “Stop the Killing”
 

UPCOMING EVENTS
June 7 - Father McCarthy Study Groups
August 4 - 9 – Campaign Nonviolence Conference in Santa Fe, NM, including a special Pax Christi USA program on August 6 (Hiroshima Day)
October 30-31 – Sr. Simone Campbell of Nuns on the Bus and Network with return.
Ken Butigan of Pace e Bene and Campaign Nonviolence will be scheduled later for a workshop on nonviolence.

FROM POPE FRANCIS
“From this standpoint, it is clear that, for the world’s peoples, armed conflicts are always a deliberate negation of international harmony, and create profound divisions and deep wounds which require many years to heal. Wars are a concrete refusal to pursue the great economic and social goals that the international community has set itself, as seen, for example, in the Millennium Development Goals. Unfortunately, the many armed conflicts which continue to afflict the world today present us daily with dramatic images of misery, hunger, illness and death. Without peace, there can be no form of economic development. Violence never begets peace, the necessary condition for development.”
Pope Francis, in a letter to Vladimir Putin, on the occasion of the G20 St. Petersburg Summit, Sept. 4, 2013

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 3, 2015


Pax Christi April Meeting
After a summary of recent activities of Pax Christi Memphis was shared from the group, the assembled community discussed briefly the mission statement of Pax Christi USA.
A portion our meeting was given to reflection on 1 Corinthians 12:4-11, 27, 28 in view of further sharing latter to bring out the gifts we see in our Pax Christi community.
Some thoughts that were shared after silent reflection included the following:
  • in our group there are unique gifts to be appreciated and activated for the common good by the Spirit of Christ;
  • we are called to love as Christ loves;
  • we learn of God’s love in the Gospel message;
  • everyone has something to contribute to our mission;
  • openness to the Spirit leads to discovery of the richness of our giftedness;
  • each one can ask, “What is my purpose in life?”
  • our gifts can be extended outward like waves in a body of water.
The assignment given to the group for the next meeting was “to discern in our group the gifts that we see—without attaching any persons’ names to these gifts, talents, skills, and so on.”

The group came to a consensus that we would contribute from our treasury $150.00 to support the Gandhi-King Conference this year. A check for that amount has been delivered to the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center.

In our  discernment process we might take inspiration from Pope Francis and perceive a context for our mission in the Christian community.
The Holy Spirit also enriches the entire evangelizing Church with different charisms. These gifts are meant to renew and build up the Church. They are not an inheritance, safely secured and entrusted to a small group for safekeeping; rather they are gifts of the Spirit integrated into the body of the Church, drawn to the centre which is Christ and then channelled into an evangelizing impulse. A sure sign of the authenticity of a charism is its ecclesial character, its ability to be integrated harmoniously into the life of God’s holy and faithful people for the good of all. Something truly new brought about by the Spirit need not overshadow other gifts and spiritualities in making itself felt. To the extent that a charism is better directed to the heart of the Gospel, its exercise will be more ecclesial. It is in communion, even when this proves painful, that a charism is seen to be authentic and mysteriously fruitful. On the basis of her response to this challenge, the Church can be a model of peace in our world.
(Paragraph 130 in Joy of the Gospel,  emphasis added)
Appeal from Pax Christi USA
Dear PCUSA Local Leader,
I begin by thanking your for your commitment to your local Pax Christi USA local group. Your local peace with justice activities continues to enable us to be the national Catholic peace with justice movement.
In reviewing the current structure of PCUSA, I clearly understand that not all local groups form part of a region. This e-mail is an attempt to help us align our local groups (such as yours) with the national office. It is critical that every member of your local group be a dues paying member of Pax Christi USA.
With this in mind, I am asking you for two (2) things:
1. Please be sure to encourage your local PCUSA members to pay their annual dues to the national office. This can be done in two ways:
  • Becoming a member of the Sustainers' Circle by a minimum monthly donation of ten dollars ($10.00) through your credit card. Simply go on line at www.paxchristiusa and follow the directions.
  • Paying the Regular Membership fee of forty dollars ($40.00) per year by submitting a check to the national office.  
2. Please provide me with a listing (name, address, telephone, e-mail) of your local dues paying members of Pax Christi USA. We want to be sure that they are acknowledged in our data base.
In closing, thank you for your ongoing financial support to Pax Christi USA and if have have questions, please feel free to contact me at pchappell@paxchristi.org.
Peace and continued Blessings
Sr. Patricia Chappell,
Executive Director Pax Christi USA

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 2, 2015

 Next meeting: Featured speaker will be
Rita Harris of the Sierra Club

Sierra Club organizer Rita Harris has been fighting for Environmental Justice in Memphis since the early 1990s. Leading frequent Toxic Tours and working with the community to campaign against major polluters, Rita works alongside residents to protect their land, air, water, and health. An air pollution monitoring program, a mapping project to alert residents to the dangers of a chemical spill, and an ongoing fight against a hazardous waste-burning incinerator all highlight actions by Memphis residents to improve environmental quality and justice for their communities.
http://vault.sierraclub.org/ej/programs/tn.aspx


From: USCCB Department of Justice, Peace & Human Development
Quotes from Pope Francis

Let us protect Christ in our lives, so that we can protect others, so that we can protect creation! (3/19/13)
The vocation of being a "protector", however, is not just something involving us Christians alone; it also has a prior dimension which is simply human, involving everyone. It means protecting all creation, the beauty of the created world, as the Book of Genesis tells us and as Saint Francis of Assisi showed us. It means respecting each of God’s creatures and respecting the environment in which we live. (3/19/13)
Please, I would like to ask all those who have positions of responsibility in economic, political and social life, and all men and women of goodwill: let us be "protectors" of creation, protectors of God’s plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment. (3/19/13)
To protect creation, to protect every man and every woman, to look upon them with tenderness and love, is to open up a horizon of hope; it is to let a shaft of light break through the heavy clouds; it is to bring the warmth of hope! (3/19/13)

Biblical Reflections
Psalm 24:1
A Psalm of David. The earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein ...
Luke 12:6 Are not five sparrows sold for two pennies? And not one of them is forgotten before God.
Jeremiah 12:4 How long will the land mourn and the grass of every field wither? For the evil of those who dwell in it the beasts and the birds are swept away, because they said, “He will not see our latter end.”

February Meeting
Paul Garner
, Organizing Coordinator at the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center, updated Pax Christi Memphis members on the work of Memphis United and their push to re-establish a Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board in Memphis, after it was essentially disbanded by the city's administration. Paul pointed to a number of incidents that highlight the need for civilian oversight in the community. Pax Christi Memphis agreed to lend their support to the grassroots coalition that leads the effort to push for greater accountability from local government and law enforcement. Paul also described his work with H.O.P.E.  (Homeless Organizing for Power and Equality) and numerous other initiatives currently underway at MSPJC. His presentation included a sneak peak at the 2015 Annual Report.
 
The group also heard from Iris Mercado, West Tennessee Organizer at the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Right Coalition. Iris spoke briefly about issues currently facing the state's immigrant population, and her work to strengthen their voice and protect their rights. Iris plans to return to Pax Christi in the near future to further expand on the important work being done by TIRRC.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 1, 2015

Pax Christi January Meeting – News Briefs
The opening prayer of the meeting included renewing the Vow of Nonviolence by members present.
After a short review of the events of 2014, discussion led into consideration of projections for the current year 2015.
Points considered were:
  • working with African American groups in nonviolent action;
  • becoming better ambassadors for nonviolence; for example, in dealing with anger in response to events or conditions;
  • promoting/providing training for others in the way of nonviolence;
  • advocating learning nonviolence in Catholic Schools.
Details of strategies for realizing these objectives agreed upon will have to be worked out, perhaps in future meetings or in ad hoc sessions of Pax Christi members.
Various members made financial contributions to our mission according to their means and sense of  dedication to what we stand for and what we do.
Pax Christi committed to  contribute to the Anniversary Banquet of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center as a sponsor. A number of Pax Christi members had also agreed to join in purchasing a group ticket for a table at the banquet.
Pax Christi member Deacon Henry Littleton has been appointed to the board of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center.

Future Events (2015)
February 10 - Pax Christi Memphis will meet at the Memphis Friends Meeting House.
March 10 - Pax Christi Memphis will meet with Rita Harris of the Sierra Club
April 4 - Eco Eggstravaganza, Earth Day celebration at Shelby Farms, 10 am - 4 pm
April 10 - 11 - Gandhi-King Community Conference
April 16 - Vanderhaar Symposium - featuring Sr. Simone Campbell of Network

The Challenge of Peace
    It is our own lifestyle that is first put at risk by genuine conversation between our social situation and the dangerous memory of Jesus the Liberator who is Good News for the poor.
    Responding to the bishops' pastoral on "The Challenge of Peace" is not merely dangerous to people who manage the Pentagon. War industry accounts for about 10 percent of the world's total economy,* and a much higher percentage in the United States. Making products for war is one of the principal structuring forces in the American economy. It is, in fact, an integral part of our entire social system. The principal and substantial income of millions of Americans depends upon this aspect of the economy. Responding seriously, systematically, and successfully to the peace pastoral would affect the income of a significant portion of us middle-class people, and would radically challenge our entire economic structure.
    We have no experience of peace as a structuring force operative within our economy. Over the last several years, we have the largest military budgets in the history of "peace" time.
(Page 157 in Dangerous Memories (1986) by Bernard J. Lee and Michael A. Cowan)
* In a footnote the same authors state: "What becomes increasing clear is the intimate connection between the bishops' pastorals on peace and economics."

Pax Christi USA reaffirms its 1981 Seamless Garment position in support of all life. The consistent ethic of life opposes not only abortion, but also the death penalty, war, the nuclear arms race and anything that threatens life….
    Pax Christi’s opposition to abortion is based on a total commitment to the principle of unwavering reverence for human life. We reject, as we have rejected in the past, the claim of any individual, any group or organization, any nation to the “right” to destroy human life, whether singly or as entire populations.
    Having made this clear, we agree that our concern must not only ensure saving the lives of the not-yet-born but also include recognizing that every child must be assured the opportunity to meet their basic human need and to develop and fulfill their physical, intellectual and spiritual capacities. The fact that 40% of the homeless in the US are families with children cannot be overlooked in our present debate.
(http://paxchristiusa.org/2011/01/16/statement-pax-christi-usa-official-statement-on-abortion/)
Prayer by Brother Roger, Taizé
O Risen Christ,
You breathe your Holy Spirit on us
and you tell us: 'Peace be Yours.'
Opening ourselves to your peace -
letting it penetrate the harsh and
rocky ground or our hearts -
means preparing ourselves to be
bearers of reconciliation
wherever you may place us.
But you know that at times
we are at a loss.
So come and lead us
to wait in silence,
to let a ray of hope shine forth
 in our world.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 8, 2014

Pax Christi December meeting:
We were welcomed with great warmth to our new meeting place by members of the Memphis Friends Meeting--Quakers when we arrived for our December gathering. And we are most grateful to their community for their gracious hospitality making us feel at home.
Our meeting began with Advent prayer. Then followed a summary of members' activity in the Memphis community, mostly related to local rallies and events of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center.
Emilie Bowman of the Workers Interfaith Network (WIN) addressed the assembled members about the work of WIN:
• Fast food workers are a focus of attention in terms of demonstrations for living wages.
• Training of workers denied their just wages because of employer wage theft is an ongoing challenge to WIN.
• In regard to training and services to persons denied their pay, plans for the future include opening a workers' center for African Americans, in addition to the center already in operation for Hispanic workers.
• The current situation at the Kellogg plant is a matter of concern because the company in not hiring anyone to take open positions, thus possibly leading to closure of the plant in Memphis with a consequent loss of jobs.

Pax Christi USA
On the website of Pax Christi USA archived newsletters are devoted to the priorities of our national organization; go to http://paxchristiusa.org/resources/membership-newsletters/
  • Winter 2014 - Priority: Economic and Interracial Justice in the United States
  • Summer 2014 - Priority: Human Rights and Global Restoration
  • Spring 2014 - Priority: Disarmament, Demilitarization and Reconciliation with Justice
  • Fall 2013 - Priority: Spirituality of Nonviolence and Peacemaking
  • Summer 2013 - Priority: Economic and Interracial Justice in the United States
  • Spring 2013 - Priority: Global Restoration and Human Rights

Prayer to Disarm my Heart
(United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, adapted)
God, thank you for your great love and all that you give us.
Grant us the grace and the courage to live a life of nonviolence so that we may love everyone as our sisters and brothers and not fear anyone.
Help us to be instruments of your peace, to respond with love and not retaliate with violence, to accept suffering rather than to inflict it, to live more simply, to resist death and to choose life for all your children.
Guide us along the way of nonviolence. Disarm our hearts and we shall be your instruments to disarm other hearts.
Lead us, God of nonviolence, into your reign of love and peace, where there is no fear and no violence.
We ask this in the name of Jesus. Amen.

Future Events
January 13, 2015 - Pax Christi Memphis will meet at the Memphis Friends Meeting House.
April 10 - 11, 2015 - Gandhi-King Community Conference
April 16, 2015 - Vanderhaar Symposium - featuring Sr. Simone Campbell of Network

Appeal for Support - From Sister Patricia Chappell, SNDdeN, Executive Director, Pax Christi USA
"I would ask you to seriously consider a donation of whatever you can afford to Pax Christi during this Christmas season so that we can continue our work of peace and justice. You may . . . visit our website at www.paxchristiusa.org or call us at 202-635-2741 to make a donation. Your gift will multiply in ways unimaginable to our limited perspective, and your presence will be embodied in the presents you give."
Join PCUSA
Please consider, at least, becoming a paid up member of PCUSA. Regular dues are $40.00/year but you may choose to give another amount. You may bring your membership donation to the January meeting of Pax Christi Memphis or mail it to Pax Christi USA, 415 Michigan Ave. NE, Suite 240; Washington, DC 20017-4503.
Contribute to Pax Christi Memphis
Our own chapter of Pax Christi also needs funds to continue generating programs for peace and justice that are part of our mission. Give what you can. Bring your contribution to the January meeting or mail it to:
Pax Christi Memphis, 4043 Allison, Memphis, TN 38122-3804.

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 7, 2014

Pax Christi November meeting:
We gathered on November 11 at the home of Terry Hash (Thank you, Terry).
After prayer from the Scriptures Ed Wallin spoke of his journey from war to peace and of his determination to care for veterans after his service as a military chaplain. He spoke of serving homeless veterans through the Alpha-Omega agency. He pointed out that one in five veterans are homeless. His work for a veterans home and with the Veterans Administration is a way for him of following the nonviolent Christ.
Events that have engaged Pax Christi members include: attendance at the F.F.U.N. (Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives) picnic; involvement with Connect for Peace prayer and demonstration by 300 plus youth; and the Call To Action conference that featured among others James Lawson, civil rights leader and organizer as well as Elizabeth Johnson who spoke on care for creation.
An extended discussion was devoted to finding a venue for our future gatherings. (Since the meeting, that issue has been resolved.)
The possibility of forming a group for the study of the thought of Fr. Charles McCarthy was presented. Inner work by individuals and nonviolent living were indicated as principle themes of the study to be undertaken.

Looking to the Future
December 13 - John Angotti in Concert
    - benefit for Catholic Charities
April 10 - 11, 2015 - Gandhi-King Community Conference
April 16, 2015 - Vanderhaar Symposium
    - featuring Sr. Simone Campbell of Network

Thoughts from Pope Francis in The Joy of the Gosple
239. The Church proclaims “the Gospel of peace” (Eph 6:15) and she wishes to cooperate with all national and international authorities in safeguarding this immense universal good. By preaching Jesus Christ, who is himself peace (cf. Eph 2:14), the new evangelization calls on every baptized person to be a peacemaker and a credible witness to a reconciled life. In a culture which privileges dialogue as a form of encounter, it is time to devise a means for building consensus and agreement while seeking the goal of a just, responsive and inclusive society. The principal author, the historic subject of this process, is the people as a whole and their culture, and not a single class, minority, group or elite. We do not need plans drawn up by a few for the few, or an enlightened or outspoken minority which claims to speak for everyone. It is about agreeing to live together, a social and cultural pact.

If you want God, and long for union with God, yet sometimes wonder what that means or whether it can mean anything at all, you are already walking with God who  comes. If you are at times so weary and involved with the struggle of living that you have no strength even to want God, yet you are still dissatisfied that you don't, you are already keeping Advent in your life. If you ever had an obscure intuition that the truth of things is somehow better, greater, more wonderful that you deserve or desire, … that there is mercy beyond anything you could ever suspect, you are already drawn into the central mystery of salvation.
Maria Boulding in The Coming of God

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 6, 2014

Pax Christi October meeting:
Stephen Bush, Chief Public Defender in Shelby County, will be at the October 14 meeting of Pax Christi Memphis to speak about the work of the Public Defender's Office in a program that brings together resources from government and the community to deal with special needs of persons  who have mental health challenges and who come through the criminal justice system.
Tuesday, Oct 14, University of Memphis Catholic Center, 3625 Mynders Ave. 6:45 social time, 7PM start.
Contact Terry Hash for more info: terez58@aol.com • 901.849.0983

Remarks in the introduction to the CNV event
with Sr. Jeannine Gramick on 9/25/2014

    Good evening. My name is Terry Hash and I want to thank Pastor Cheryl Cornish and all of the wonderful members of First Congregational Church for opening their arms and doors and allowing us to be here this evening, especially on such short notice. We are truly grateful.
    I am one of the coordinators of Pax Christi Memphis. Pax Christi is an international Catholic peace and justice movement open to all faiths. There are over half a million PC members throughout the US. We use a model of prayer, study, and action to work for justice and peace and we promote the importance of understanding the root causes of injustice and violence. In short - we strive to create a world that reflects the peace of Christ.
    This presentation tonight by Sister Jeannine Gramick on violence toward the LGBT community and what we can do about it is brought to you by CNVMemphis. We are a part of Campaign Nonviolence, a new long-term movement to mainstream active nonviolence - spreading nonviolence as an obvious and natural way of life and taking action for a world that works for all of us. 
    CNVMemphis has taken action all week. We began Friday with a march in Smoky City, a Memphis neighborhood plagued by violence, to say “ Enough is enough” to violence in their community. We had a day long retreat with Father Charlie McCarthy on Saturday, studying Gospel nonviolence. We had a Sing a Song for Peace rally down at Robert Church Park on Beale St. on Sunday that was a lot of fun. We hosted an International Day of Peace poster contest in the Catholic elementary schools and had over 70 wonderful entries. The winning poster is posted on our website. Tomorrow we are right back here with a community forum on Gun Violence where we will have a group of community leaders with diverse backgrounds tell us what positive steps are being taken to curb gun violence and what we as a community can do. And on Saturday we will march in solidarity and peace with our LGBT brothers and sisters in the Pride March on Beale.
See cnvmemphis.org

Prayer at the September 25th discussion with Sr. Jeanine Grammick
We believe that Your love will find a way to heal our wounded world, and that suffering and poverty will end. For we believe in Your persistent love.
We believe that You have made us who we are, in Your image, a beautiful community of race and culture and sexual identity. You declared us ‘good’.  We celebrate this diversity, for we believe in Your creative imagination.
We believe we are all members of one body. We share a heart with those who suffer violence, who live in fear, who are cast out because of their sexuality or any other reason. We ache with them, for we believe that You love without exception.
We believe that we are not yet perfected. We fear. We judge. We cause harm by our action and our inaction. But we still turn to You for help, for we believe in Your forgiveness.
We believe that it is not too late for those filled with hate to learn to live in love. For we believe in Your heart-transforming power.
We believe that our prayers do matter, and so we offer them now for the people and places that long for relief from suffering. For we believe in the power of prayer.
We believe in gratitude. We offer thanks for those brave souls who risk much for others. We offer thanks for those moments of grace that sustain us.  For we believe that Your love and grace surround us on every side.
We believe that the church is an imperfect but well intentioned collection of souls. Even though we often fail to understand Your Gospel, even though we often lack the courage to take risks for justice, even though we have not always welcomed Your beloved outcasts, still we see that You have not abandoned us. For we believe that You still see hope in us.
Help us Lord to be a better community. Send us into the world as the life-changing, liberating church You imagine.  All this we ask in Your name and through the power of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.
Adapted from Sunday morning liturgy for LGBT by Rev. LeeAnne Watkins St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Paul MN, Ann B. Day Dumbarton UMC

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 4, 2014

May Gathering
Report on Immigration by Terry Hash

Reform efforts by TIRRC (Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition) are currently shifted toward focus on things that the President can do:
  • Stop deportations;
  • extend DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) to adults; the Department of Homeland Security can change procedures without Congressional approval.

Speaker
Elaine Blanchard made a presentation on "The Power of Storytelling" and shared "Inside Story," the documentary on her ministry in the Shelby County Jail. Writing one's story and telling it to others meets the need for meaning in inmates' lives. Elaine uses four books in her sessions with women at the jail; they are
Writing the Memoire: From Truth to Art by Judith Barrington
  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings  by Maya Angelou
  • Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life by Marshall Rosenberg
  • Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
Elaine's website is found at elaineblanchard.com

Future

  • It’s party time! Come and enjoy a Pax Christi pool party/barbecue/meeting!
  • Tuesday, June 17 (no meeting June 10). The Hash Home at 8450 Glenbrae Cv., Germantown, TN 38139. Spouses, significant others, families are invited . Since this will be our June meeting, we will be discussing Campaign Nonviolence and options for our action in September. Please bring ideas and any info on happenings around the city that we can tie into. Please RSVP for food preparation purposes terez58@aol.com or 849-0983. Hope to see you all there!
  • Gun violence - Paul Crum has proposed collaboration with other movements that are dedicated to limiting the gun violence in our community. Stay Tuned!
  • Campaign Nonviolence invites all of us to:
  1. Practice active nonviolence toward ourselves, toward all others, and toward the world.
  2. Join in building a culture of active nonviolence.
  3. Take nonviolent action together connecting the dots between peace, economic justice, and the environment.  
  4. Participate in action during Campaign Nonviolence Week in September. See the  check list and timeline for the months before at their website.
    April
    ♣    Form a local CNV Organizing Committee
    ♣    Begin brainstorming September action ideas
    ♣    Meet with groups working on war, poverty and the environment
    ♣    Spread CNV Pledge through email, Facebook, and Twitter
    May
    ♣    Set a date for your local September nonviolent action
    ♣    Form action committee(s) to develop organizing plans
    ♣    Set a nonviolent action training between June and September
    ♣    Brainstorm ways to spread active nonviolence locally

Retreat: Save the Date!
Pax Christi Memphis is bringing Father Charles McCarthy back! We are sponsoring a retreat led by Father McCarthy, GOSPEL NONVIOLENCE: Option or Obligation?
Saturday, September 20, 2014 at Church of the Holy Spirit. This will be a daylong retreat followed by 5PM Parish Mass. Save the Date!

It is one thing to employ violence in combat as a means of defense. It is quite another thing …  to assign it the most vital place in the social struggle….The one thing I am convinced of as I have never been in my life is that the gun decides nothing at all. Even if it accomplishes what it sets out to do--which it rarely does--it brings so many evils in its wake as to defeat its original aim. -Emma Goldman, Anarchist

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 3, 2014

Events

Pax Christi Memphis is providing a potluck for University Students after the Sunday mass at the Catholic Campus Ministry on Mynders on May 4 at 5 pm. Join us in prayer and feasting.

At the next meeting on May 13, Elaine Blanchard will speak on "The Power of Storytelling" and there will be the showing of a documentary about her work, "Inside Story." See the poster below for more information.

Fr. John Dear at First Congo

On April 8 First Congregational Church hosted Fr. John Dear who spoke to some 150 persons in the audience about the substance of his most recent book, The Nonviolent Life.
During his brief visit to Memphis John was interviewed on Memphis radio and made an appearance on WREC Channel 3.
John left us with three admonitions:
  • practice nonviolence toward oneself;
  • put nonviolence into practice in one's personal relationships;
  • and join the movement for nonviolence in working for change in our world..
Special Thanks! We owe our gratitude to Monica Juma and her collaborators who worked so hard to make John Dear's visit a reality.

 
Monica Juma was responsible for bringing the speaker to Memphis and organizing the event. She introduced John
to an eager crowd.
 
John Dear brought his
message of peace to the
attentive audience and
praised those in attendance
for the work they do.
 
Two modern day prophets
of peace: John Dear &
Pete Gathje. John signed
copies of his newest book,
"The Nonviolent Life"

Support for PCM
Pax Christi Memphis depends on the generosity of its supporters for the funding needed to promote and present various programs. The financial contributions of those who are interested in and/or participate in the Pax Christi movement in Memphis are always most welcome. Send donations to Pax Christi Memphis at 4043 Allison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38122. Checks or money orders are to be made out to "Pax Christi Memphis."

Embroidery Available
We have digitized the Pax Christi logo for embroidery on any garment you choose. You do not have to buy the garments from Bartlett Art Printing, but we can show you a catalog of shirts, etc. and will sell them at our cost (wholesale) if you wish. We will also do the embroidery at our cost - probably around $4.50 - $5.00 each depending upon the size of the order. Pat and I are going to do polo shirts and long sleeve button downs, but the logo could also be stitched on sweaters, sweatshirts, jackets, etc. Please bring your garment(s) to the May 13th meeting, or let me know and I'll get a catalog to you.
If we do the church visitations we keep talking about, this would be a nice way to lend some identity to our movement. The embroidery is approximately 4.5 inches wide.
-- Paul Crum

Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 2, 2014

PAX CHRISTI DAY OF DISCERNMENT
Saturday, January 18.  9AM-3PM.
University of Memphis Catholic Center Mynders Ave.

This exercise considered four phases of the history of Pax Christi Memphis:

  • Past 1974 - 1982
  • Past 1982 - 2001
  • Present 2001-2014
  • Future …. 

Reactions to the event were brought out in our discussion by those assembled on February 11.

Notes from discussions of February 11, 2014
Campaign Nonviolence

Monica Juma is the Tennessee coordinator for this effort and spoke of the possibility of small groups for the study of nonviolence. Pax Christi members are invited to participate in the campaign.

Coordinator for May 4 student dinner: Anyone who is willing to volunteer to oversee the food arrangements for this potluck sponsored by Pax Christi Memphis is asked to contact Terry Hash (terez58@aol.com). 

John Dear book tour, April 8:

Plans for activities with John Dear during his visit to Memphis are progressing and some are being finalized. Publicity will provide the details in the near future.


Deacon Henry Littleton

has been nominated to join the Board of the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center as representing Pax Christi.


Discussion of the Day of Discernment:

As Pax Christi Memphis moves into the future we are now entering a "year of discernment." 

We have the impression that the 40-year history of the movement in Memphis has been very active. The rendition of our history on the Day of Discernment was enlightening for many of us. For example, action to stop the White Train stands out in peoples' minds. 

We can see ourselves as being gathered to be sent. Part of our strength is our commitment over time, as well as our collaboration with others such as Women In Black, the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center, Tennesseans for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, war protests in public places and visits to the Oak Ridge nuclear protests.

We are really part of a movement as much as m embers of an organization. Our coming together can be seen as "gathering" as opposed to "having meetings." In our number, there are different relationships and ways of participation within the movement, locally and on the national level. 

Story telling is an important part of our message, a way of engaging others in dialogue and participation.


Attendance at recent public events

  • The Narrow Path: Walking Toward Peace and Nonviolence with John Dear; the January 10 showing of this film was viewed by about 50 persons, including several from Pax Christi Memphis. 
  • Mid-South Farm to Table Conference at CBU on February 4 was attended by Janice Vanderhaar and Ed Wallin and Jerry and Judy Bettice.

Upcoming Events

March 27- Vanderhaar Symposium 

April 8- John Dear visit (this will be our monthly gathering for April.)

May 4- Pot Luck dinner at the Catholic Center


Spiritual Nourishment for Peacemakers

  • The Nonviolent Life by John Dear
  • The Joy of the Gospel (Evangelii Gaudium) - The Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis - Pray with John and Francis! Form or join a study group! Put what you learn into ACTION!


Pax Christi Memphis
News and Notes
Number 1, 2014

PAX CHRISTI DAY OF DISCERNMENT
Saturday, January 18.  9AM-3PM. 
University of Memphis Catholic Center Mynders Ave.

    It is hard to believe that Pax Christi Memphis celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2013. We have come a long way in 40 years and there are still many challenges ahead for us. In order for PC Memphis to stay relevant and effective in our work for a nonviolent and just world, we need to take a step back and look at where we have been in the past, where we are now, where we want to be in the future and how to get there. With the changing world around us, PC Memphis needs to revitalize our mission and create a path for our future. This is not an easy task, but we have great news! PC Memphis has commissioned Mary Jo Greil, President of the Carson Greil Group and organizational change consultant, to hold a Discernment Day for Pax Christi Memphis. This is a day when we will honor our past and plan for our future in an engaging, supportive atmosphere that encourages constructive conversation to:

    •    show links between past, present, and future
    •    see how change has been a part of our past
    •    bring clarity to “who” PC Memphis is
    •    stimulate plans and actions for our future
    •    energize people to work together

    YOUR voice--whether you are a new or seasoned member--is needed to ensure Pax Christi Memphis remains the powerful voice of nonviolence and social justice that it has been for the past 40 years. Help us plan for the next 40 years!

    PAX CHRISTI MEMPHIS DAY OF DISCERNMENT
    University of Memphis Catholic Center Mynders Ave.
    Donuts, coffee and chatter at 8:30AM. 
    Lunch will be provided (donations to cover cost will be appreciated).


    Please RSVP so we can plan for food and seats. Contact Terry Hash terez58@aol.com849-0983 or Janice Vanderhaar gvanderhaar@earthlink.net 362-9364. 
    Please do not let transportation issues keep you away; contact Terry to arrange a ride.
    For more information about Mary Jo Greil, go to www.carsongreil.com.

    Membership
    Thanks to all who sent their annual dues and to those who sent extra support for Pax Christi Memphis. It is never too late to make your contribution in cash, check or simply by joining us in person for our monthly gathering.

    Events
    Advocacy 101: From Pew to the Capitol - On January 4, at St. Francis Church, Jennifer and Mike Murphy, lobbyists for the Tennessee Catholic Public Policy Commission (TNCPPC), presented a workshop on how we can become engaged in the political process for justice. It was a practical exercise in Catholic Social Teaching. Three members of Pax Christi Memphis participated and were enlightened about Tennessee state government. 
    Do you know who your representative in the House and your Senator are? 
    The new legislative session begins on January 14, 2014. To keep up with the issues in our state and for more on the TNCPPC you may go to: www.tncppc.org/.
    NATIONAL COUNCIL: 
    Nominations now being sought for Pax Christi USA National Council elections 
    You may nominate anyone for this election here.

    I would like to make an appeal to those in possession of greater resources, to public authorities and to all people of good will who are working for social justice: never tire of working for a more just world, marked by greater solidarity!

    - Pope Francis, Address during Visit to the Community at Varginha, July 25, 2013

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 9, 2013

    Recent News
    • Fr. Al Kirk, Altonette Stone and Jerry Bettice met with Bishop Terry Steib to discuss the Pax Christi Memphis proposal for diocesan Peace and Justice Committee. The Bishop is taking the matter into consideration and consulting with others about adopting the idea.
    • Terry Hash spoke at United Prayers for World Peace, an interfaith event on November 17. 
    • Pax Christi Memphis provide a potluck dinner for Catholic Campus Ministry on December 1 after the 5 PM Mass that day. (Our next such potluck is scheduled for May 4, 2014.

    Fr. Bryan Massingale - Further reflections on his address to the Pax Christi National Assembly, June 16, 2013 (Courtesy of Judy Bettice)

    Challenges to Pax Christi:

    1. Be intentionally and proactively multicultural.

    We are a brown church; the future is brown and comes from Asia, Africa and Latin America. We need a new nonviolent agenda.

    2. Confront our unconscious racism.

    Poverty, racism and militarism challenge us. All struggle is connected. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. See the connections between violence at home and U.S. violence abroad.

    3. Link peacemaking with consumerism and environmental justice.

    Nonviolence is the best attractor to the next generation, who are very sensitive to gross economic disparities. As Earth becomes more polluted, most affected are women and children and the poor among us.

    4. Welcome all gender orientations and  identities.

    Justice and human rights issues are protected by the Gospel; young Catholics will not join anti-gay movements. We might catch "hell" for this.

    5. Expand the circle of those who matter with a justice vision in harmony with biblical Shalom.

    Biblical Shalom is very costly, but it is the wholeness we all seek and includes the poor, the widow, the stranger. It is God who makes us instruments of peace.

    6. Cultivate a stance of contemplation. 

    Prayer hollows us out to become hallowed. We will be more open, receptive and vulnerable. This means desert living, even beyond the confines of the Catholic Church. 

    Reflection on Isaiah 11:1-10 

    (First Tuesday of Advent)

    How are we to explain the fact that the bible speaks so often of peace and presents the future Messiah as the prince of peace; that papal teachings have repeatedly emphasized the point, and yet the mass of the faithful remain uninfluenced? Peace is simply the thrust of all humanity towards a greater dimension of humanity. (People) today realize quite well that their aspirations can only be fulfilled on an international scale; that without peace we cannot have either science, or democracy, or justice. It is thus the more difficult to understand the indifference among Christians to Church and government involvements at the nerve-centers of war and oppression. Can it be that Christians are concerned only with peace of heart and conscience, not with sociological or international peace?

    One must admit that large societies do have a tendency to lull individual members and atrophy any inclinations towards taking a stand. And in a society so centralized as the Church, those at the bottom are disinterested in the stands taken by authority at the top because they do not feel a responsibility. In this area reform of structure is an urgent necessity. On the whole however Christian indifference is be explained by insufficient information, or inability to analyze the situation properly. Unless the gospel is thoroughly analyzed and made precise it will not lead a (person) to active involvement. Too many Christians are unaware of such insights, or reject them with all their implications. They cannot take conscientious objectors seriously, or antimilitarists. They are disturbed when priests take attitudes in this domain that they consider too "political," as if indeed any human being in our day could possibly avoid being a member of (one's) society. It is only by means of such involvement that the gospel doctrine of peace can become really efficacious, that the Prince of peace can really inaugurate his kingdom. 

    (From Guide for the Christian Assembly by Thierry Maertens and Jean Frisque, 1971)

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 8, 2013

    Action: Immigration
    As part of a nationwide Day of Dignity and Respect, TIRRC (Tennessee Immigration and Refugee Rights Coalition) is holding a public forum on Sat., October 5 in Jackson, TN at 3 PM at St. Mary's Church, 1665 US 45 bypass in Jackson, to urge Rep. Stephen Fincher to work for comprehensive immigration reform.

    TIRRC will be caravanning from their office at 3573 Southern Ave., Memphis at 1:30 PM. Pax Christi members are urged to support our friends at TIRRC and attend the forum. For carpool info to Jackson, contact Terry Hash at 849-0983 or terez58@aol.com.

    Topic of Oct. 8th Meeting is IMMIGRATION REFORM: The Time is Now
    Iris Mercado will briefly give us an overview of the history of immigration reform, then we will watch the video "The Dream is Now" with discussion to follow. Where do we stand today? Where do we want to be? What obstacles are we facing? What action will we take?

    Our members come from all over the greater Memphis area. Don't let a lack of transportation stop you from attending meetings. Contact Terry at terez58@aol.com or 849-0983 to carpool.  

    Commonsense Immigration Reform (From NETWORK) 
    Our Catholic faith grounds us in the realization that each person has inherent dignity because he or she is created in the image and likeness of God. As children of God, we are treasured and valuable as we are. Throughout the Gospel, there are countless references that we must 'welcome the stranger' and care for them as ourselves. Because of this, all our national policies, including immigration policies, should respect and protect the dignity of each person.

    Our nation's immigration system is broken. Increased enforcement is tearing families apart and causing suffering for those who are otherwise willing and eager to contribute to our society. Our nation needs an immigration system that reflects our faith values and the needs of the twenty-first century. Such a system reunites families and allows workers the opportunity to come forward without fear to pay taxes and earn legalization. A functioning system will serve the needs or our entire nation.

    NETWORK, A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby, calls for commonsense immigration reform that

    • Ensures family unity
    • Protects the rights of immigrant workers
    • Acknowledges that our borders are already secure, with only minor changes needed  Speeds us processing of already-approved immigrants
    • Enhances the present diversity visa program
    • Provides a clear and direct pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people who are undocumented in the U.S.

    Source: http://www.networklobby.org/issues/ comprehensive-immigration-reform

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 7, 2013


    Pax Christi is a Latin term meaning "the Peace of Christ".
    Pax Christi Memphis is the local chapter of Pax Christi USA, the national Catholic peace movement in the United States.  Pax Christi strives to create a world that reflects the peace of Christ by exploring, articulating, and witnessing to the call of Christian nonviolence. Pax Christi USA commits itself to peace education and, with the help of its bishop members, promotes the Gospel imperative of peacemaking as a priority in the Catholic Church in the United States. In a world that settles differences by armed violence or the threat of war, Pax Christi offers a nonviolent alternative. In a world that too often defines "justice" as "revenge", Pax Christi USA dares to break the cycle of violence by fostering reconciliation. Through the efforts of all its members and in cooperation with other groups, Pax Christi USA works toward a more peaceful, just and sustainable world.

    Pax Christi USA works in four priority areas: 1 Spirituality of Nonviolence and Peacemaking; 2 Dis- armament, Demilitarization, and Reconciliation with Justice; 3 Economic and Interracial Justice in the United States; 4 Human Rights and Global Restoration.

    History
    In 1945 a small group of Catholics in France began to meet regularly to pray for peace. They were troubled by the fact that French and German Catholics, who shared the same faith and the same Eucharist, had killed one another by the thousands during World War II. They prayed for forgiveness, reconciliation, and the peace of Christ. Their mission and movement spread throughout Europe in the 1950's and 1960's, and in 1972 the United States section of Pax Christi was founded. At the first national assembly in Washington, D.C., in 1973, Pax Christi USA became defined as "an association of Catholics and others committed to the exploration of Gospel nonviolence in our time". Dorothy Day was the keynote speaker.

    Pax Christi at Vatican II
    Two of the most notable groups involved in lobbying the bishops during the council were Pax Christi and the Catholic Worker. Their representatives from the U.S., Eileen Egan and Dorothy Day, were not invited as auditors of the council. Egan said she came to Rome for the discussion of Gaudium et Spes that pertained to war and peace during the month of October in 1965. She lobbied bishops and found those from Canada, New Zealand, and Africa most encouraging. Egan formulated suggestions on Gaudium et Spes and communicated them to the commissions through U.S. auditor Jim Norris. Dorothy Day joined women from five continents in a ten-day water fast to pray for the council members in their deliberations. (adapted: Guests In Their Own House: The Women of Vatican II, by Carmel McEnroy, p.125)

    Contact Pax Christi USA at 1225 Otis Street NE, Washington, D.C.20017
    202-635-2741; www.paxchristiusa.org  or info@paxchristiusa.org

    A Challenge to Pax Christi USA 
    Bryan Massingale, in his address to the 2013 PCUSA National Assembly, spoke of the movement's ongoing survival in terms of
    1) being intentionally and proactively multicultural;
    2) confronting our un- conscious racism;
    3) linking peacemaking with consumerism and environmental justice;
    4) welcoming all gender orientations and identities;
    5) a justice vision in harmony with Shalom, expanding the circle of those who matter; and
    6) a stance of contemplation.

    Pax Christi Memphis
    After many years of meeting in homes and in local parishes -- St. Patrick's, St. Michael's, Church of the Holy Spirit, Immaculate Conception Cathedral -- Pax Christi Memphis begins our second year as the guests of the Catholic Student Center at the University of Memphis. We are grateful for the warm welcome and participation by staff and students, and look forward to monthly meetings of Pax Christi Memphis on the second Tuesdays at 6:45 p.m.
    In early August, Jerry and Judy Bettice presented a 1.5 hour  program on War and Catholic Conscience for their parish adult faith formation program. It included excerpts from Vatican documents, the U.S. Catholic Bishops' pastoral "The Challenge of Peace", as well as recent statements by Benedict XVI and by the Apostolic Nuncio in Kansas City in 2011, and a short film about Blessed Franz Jaegerstatter.
    "The Legacy of Dr. Martin  Luther King, Jr.: The Dream Fulfilled" is an hour-long exploration of the ongoing challenge of nonviolence in our nation at this time in its history. If you would like to have either of these programs for your parish or small group, contact the Bettices at 327-8068 or jbettice@earthlink.net.
    Contact Pax Christi Memphis by email. Attendance at our monthly meetings is most welcome.

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 5, 2013

    MSPJC: Pax Christi becomes an Organizational Member
    In continuity with the history of the Pax Christi movement in Memphis and its relationship with the Peace and Justice Center we are now able to take advantage of the benefits of membership in the latter. We will now be listed as an organizational member of MSPJC. See more about our joint history at http://midsouthpeace.org/missionhistory.

    Altonette Stone reports on African American Catholic Evangelization Conference
    Pax Christi member Altonette Stone attended the 2013 Interregional African American Catholic Evangelization Conference held in Columbus, Ohio, from June 14-16, 2013.  The bi-annual Conferences provide an occasion for Catholics from Ohio, Indianapolis, Mississippi, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and Maryland to unite, celebrate, worship, and empower one another in their faith. 
     
    The theme this year: "Living Our Faith, Sharing Our Story." Workshops focused on presentations and group discussions about spirituality, evangelization, catechesis, being faith engaged, and youth ministry. Attendees were encouraged to participate in the exchange of ideas and strategies to improve the effectiveness within our own parishes or (arch)dioceses. As a side issue, we were informed that within five to ten years, 50 percent of U.S. priests will have retired or about to retire. This raises the question how do we as Catholics plan to tackle issues and concerns confronting the Church?

    A Challenge to Pax Christi USA 
    Bryan Massingale, in his address to the 2013 PCUSA National Assembly, spoke of the movement's ongoing survival in terms of
    1) being intentionally and proactively multicultural;
    2) confronting our un- conscious racism;
    3) linking peacemaking with consumerism and environmental justice;
    4) welcoming all gender orientations and identities;
    5) a justice vision in harmony with Shalom, expanding the circle of those who matter; and
    6) a stance of contemplation.

    Pax Christi USA 40th Anniversary Conference
        Four members of Pax Christi Memphis participated in the 40th anniversary PCUSA assembly in Atlanta on June 14-16, 2013. Janice Vanderhaar, Ed Wallin, Jerry and Judy Bettice listened to opening speaker Bishop Thomas Gumbleton , a founding member of Pax Christi USA and architect of the 1983 Bishops' pastoral letter "The Challenge of Peace", who gave a chronological survey of the Catholic peace movement. He said it was founded by Jesus himself, referring to John, Chapter 21. From the beginning of Pax Christi International in Europe after WWII to its presence today in countries worldwide, it has been "a force more powerful" in teaching and witnessing gospel nonviolence.
        On the second day, we were challenged and encouraged by two young adult activists--Adrienne Alexander, founder of Chicago Youth Workers and former national board member of Pax Christi, and Patrick Cashio from the Romero Center Ministries in Camden, New Jersey. Patrick said their generation has been "compromised by abundance"; and that "the events of September 11, 2001 have clouded our judgment. The information we have received has manipulated our response." On the positive side, the immediacy of technology allows a 29-year-old at the workplace to chat with a friend in an Afghanistan war zone. Adrienne said she had numerous twitter exchanges with a friend in Egypt, discovering later when she watched the news, that the person was a journalist. Despite the lack of rootedness in neighborhood, as in previous generations, 20-somethings find community through social networking. If Pax Christi is to engage the successor generation, we must update our tools for communication and be intentional about recognizing contributions and skills across generations.
        The final day we heard a dynamic and challenging message from Rev. Bryan Massingale, professor of theology at Marquette University in Milwaukee. If Pax Christi USA is to celebrate another anniversary 20, 10, or even 5 years from now, we must re-form our entire membership and vision to reflect the browning of America and to welcome the gifts and leadership of brown and black women and men as well as to equally value LGBT persons without exception. His 6-point "To Do List" is found above in this newsletter.
        In addition to the three plenary sessions, there were excellent workshops on immigration reform, the death penalty, drones, human trafficking, and other timely issues; a prayer ritual at the Martin Luther King, Jr. reflective pool at the King Center; shared meals; and a closing liturgy.
    (Thanks to Judy Bettice)

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 4, 2013

    April 7th Mass & Potluck:
    Pax Christi Memphis celebrated Eucharist with the Catholic Campus Ministry community in its Sunday Mass at 5:00 p.m. Fr. Al Kirk presided at the Eucharist. An abundance filled the buffet shared by all after the Mass. Conversations with students provided the opportunity for our members to be acquainted with University students. There was an exchange of views about the mission of Pax Christi as well.  The students very efficiently cleared the leftovers and returned dishes and utensils to all who brought food for the meal.
       
    May Meeting
    1. The group drafting the proposal for a diocesan committee for peace and justice will present its final draft for approval of our chapter of Pax Christi.
    2. A new planning team will be named.

    Picnic - 4043 Allison Avenue - May 18 - 3:00 until 7:00 p.m.
    See information above. RSVP - Judy and Jerry  327-8068 or jbettice@earthlink.net

    Peace I leave with you, my peace I give to you. Not as the world give do I give it to you. Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid.  (John 14)

    Peacemakers speaking out
    Within the last month there have been letters to the editor in the Commercial Appeal written by three members of Pax Christi Memphis--all advocating social justice in our civic community. Two letters addressed the cuts to Pre-K funding, and one dealt with school discipline. Keep writing, folks!
    A recent separate article featured efforts by Pax Christi members to bring peace to their neighborhood.

    Message from Christians in Memphis for Immigration Reform Association (CMIRA)
    Join us at our monthly CMIRA meeting of individuals, organizations and churches interested in not only connecting the church to the immigrants living among us but also advocating for moral reform of the complex system of immigration laws.
    (Join other PCM members who attend and participate.)
    First Friday of every month, Noon until 1:15 PM Call 327-8068 for more information.

    National Conference June 14-16:
    Plan on attending the Pax Christ USA 40th Anniversary National Conference in Atlanta, GA on June 14-16, 2013. Reserve your room at the conference site, the Sheraton Gateway Hotel at the Atlanta Airport, soon! We have locked in a special discounted rate of $95.00 per night, but the rate is only good through May 16th. (The discounted room rate is good for any days between Monday, June 10th and Thursday, June 20th for anyone who wants to arrive early or stay late.)

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 3, 2013


    Memphis United
    Pax Christi Memphis was represented at Heart of Memphis, the celebration of our city and its diversity, on March 30 at Tiger Lane near the Liberty Bowl stadium. Paul Crum, Jerry Bettice, Judy Bettice, Janice Vanderhaar and Ed Wallin welcomed visitors to the Pax Christi table that featured prayers and other printed materials about our movement.


    April Meeting:
    April 9th, 6:45, Catholic Student Center, 3625 Mynders Avenue.
       
    April 7th Mass and Potluck
    Pax Christi Memphis will join the Catholic Campus Ministry community in its Sunday Mass at 5:00 p.m. We will provide supper for all who come to celebrate after the Mass. The venue will be the Catholic Student Center at 3625 Mynders near the University of Memphis Campus. The meal will have an Italian theme. Pax Christi members are invited to bring food to share. Contact Paul or Pat Crum who are coordinating the buffet. Email: pcrum@bartlettart.com or call 266-2464.

    April Meeting topic is Legacy of MLK
    On April 9 we will gather for our regular meeting. The topic of this month's presentation will be "The Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr:  The dream fulfilled." Come and join the conversation. 

    Pope Francis in his message for Easter 2013:
    Peace in the whole world, still divided by greed looking for easy gain, wounded by the selfishness which threatens human life and the family, selfishness that continues in human trafficking, the most extensive form of slavery in this twenty-first century!
    Peace to the whole world, torn apart by violence linked to drug trafficking and by the iniquitous exploitation of natural resources!
    Peace to this our Earth! May the risen Jesus bring comfort to the victims of natural disasters and make us responsible guardians of creation.

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 2, 2013

    March Meeting:
    Vanderhaar symposium (click link above for additional details).
       
    In place of our usual gathering Pax Christi Memphis will attend the Vanderhaar Symposium at Christian Brothers University, 7 P.M. in the Spain Auditorium. This year's presentation, "Communities Engaged in Resolving Urban Social Conflict," will discuss challenges facing our communities and positive means of meeting these challenges.

    February Meeting
    Members of Pax Christi Memphis presented a reader's theater rendition of the two-act play The Predator  by Jack Gilroy. Our stars were Julie Plattin as Ella Golden—19 years old Sophomore at LeMoyne University, Syracuse, NY; Judy Bettice as Major Jennifer Golden—42 years old, drone pilot, Hancock Air Field, Syracuse, NY; Terry Hash as Senator Barbara Lewis—50 years old, United States Senator from New York; and Yvonne Fournier as Kelly Maguire—55 years old, Peace and Justice activist from Chicago.   The audience and readers engaged in a discussion after the play was presented.

    Judy Bettice, writing for the Pax Christi Memphis planning team, wrote the following response to Jack Gilroy, the author of The Predator, who had invited comments about the play:
    "... There were about 38 participants in the lively discussion, ranging from college students to an ROTC instructor, a former army chaplain, and several veterans of the Vietnam war. One veteran thought that drones were an improvement over carpet bombing and other wholesale attacks during his wartime experience. Some raised constitutional and legal questions; several addressed Christians’ commitment to the nonviolent Jesus and cited scriptural passages.
    The play (which we found on the Pax Christi national website) presented a range of viewpoints, which helped the audience prepare to listen respectfully to each others’ comments; the facilitator made sure everyone had a chance to speak, and no one person dominated the group. Overall, it was successful in that the community conversation we hoped to open up really did happen. The script was an excellent background piece, thought-provoking and well received. We had many compliments on the performances, and one person asked for the link to download it for use in a classroom setting.

    Dues
    Thanks to all who have paid their membership contribution for 2013. A mailing list of the membership of our chapter has been sent to the national office of Pax Christi. This was submitted along with a check for $100, our dues as a chapter belonging to Pax Christi USA

    Benedict XVI in his message for the World Day of Peace, January 1, 2013:
    "Peace concerns the human person as a whole, and it involves complete commitment. It is peace with God through a life lived according to [the divine will]. It is interior peace with oneself, and exterior peace with our neighbours and all creation. Above all, as Blessed John XXIII wrote in his Encyclical Pacem in Terris, whose fiftieth anniversary will fall in a few months, it entails the building up of a coexistence based on truth, freedom, love and justice."

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 1, 2013

    Next Meeting:
        Tuesday, February 12 at 6:45 PM
        A Conversation About the Use of Predator Drones
        University of Memphis Catholic Center
        There will be a presentation of The Predator
       
    Pax Christi Members:
    Please prepare for this conversation by previewing the statement on drones issued by Pax Christi International and sent to our membership two weeks ago (click the tab to the left of this column.)  If you need a copy, contact Judy or Jerry Bettice at 327-8068.

    January Meeting
    During the celebration of the Eucharist members present renewed the Vow of Nonviolence. If anyone unable to attend on January 8 wishes to sign a personal copy of the Vow,  a copy will be sent to you upon request.
    After mass there was a social hour for those gathered.

    Dues
    Thanks to all who have paid their membership contribution for 2013. So far, $200 has been collected. For anyone who has not paid this year, there is still time to join your name to the official membership list of our chapter that will be sent to the national office of Pax Christi USA.

    "Pax Christi International, in opposing the use of RPA's or drones as weapons, believes that they lower the threshold for resorting to violent force to resolve complex conflicts. In particular we oppose the use of lethal drones for targeted assassinations on what could become a battlefield without borders."
    (DRONES: Pax Christi International statement on drones, #6)

    Agenda Items
    If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice and Janice Vanderhaar.

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 9, 2012

    November 13 Meeting
    Four first-time attendees were present: Karen Schmitt, Therese Gustaitis, Julie Platten and Reed Long.
        Janice Vanderhaar, Ed Wallin and Paul Crum gave a brief report on their recent presentation to the Catholic Campus Ministry. This group expressed some interest in the possibility of forming a student Pax Christi section.
        Several members at this meeting had attended the Call To Action conference in Louisville, Kentucky, earlier in November and reported on their experiences. A connection with Pax Christi Memphis was in the keynote address by Diane Nash who was featured in the video we viewed about the historic lunch counter sit-ins in Nashville. Greg Boyle, S.J., who ministers to former gang members in Los Angeles, gave a workshop and left us a word for all peacemakers: we are to "go where love has not yet arrived." Greg Boyle also wrote Tattoos on the Heart, an account of his work with Homeboy Industries.
        The remainder of the meeting was devoted to a discussion of the proposal by Pax Christi Memphis for the establishment of a Diocesan Peace and Justice Committee. After many ideas surfaced, further dialogue on our proposal was deferred until our December meeting when a second draft of this proposal would be discussed. Fr. Al Kirk agreed to prepare the second draft based on comments gathered in this meeting and any others communicated to him afterwards. This draft was to be mailed or emailed to the membership of Pax Christi Memphis in time for review before the December gathering.

    December 11 Meeting
        Pat and Paul Crum introduced a proposal that our local Pax Christi group volunteer to prepare a meal for the students at the Catholic Campus Ministry who attend their 5 p.m. Sunday Liturgy. The group agreed to this proposal and will await more information from Pat and Paul about a given Sunday when we can carry out what we have agreed to do.
        We reached consensus on donating $100.00 for an ad in the program for the annual banquet of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center. A further suggestion was that we attend and make ourselves known as members of Pax Christi Memphis to others attending the dinner. Business cards for Pax Christi Memphis are available to assist in this effort. Call 327-8068 if you would like cards for this purpose. Tickets for the January 19 MSPJC dinner will cost $30.00 and will be available at our January meeting.   
        Members of Pax Christi are encouraged to submit their regular membership contribution between now and the end of January 2013--$15 for an individual; $20 for a couple; $5 for students or those on limited income.
        The main part of our meeting was devoted to discussing the second draft of our proposal to be given to Bishop Steib concerning the setting up of a "DIOCESAN JUSTICE AND PEACE AND CARE FOR CREATION COMMITTEE/COMMISSION." Some modifications to the draft were suggested and will be forwarded to Fr. Al Kirk, who was unable to attend this meeting. Altonette Stone, Jerry Bettice and Deacon Henry Littleton agreed to work with Fr. Al in fashioning a further revision of the proposal before the February meeting of our Pax Christi chapter.
        A final action of the assembled members was to sign a letter to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder in support of reconsideration of the severe charges made against three peace activists who breached security at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.  An editorial related to this issue is found here.

    Coming Events
    Our next gathering of Pax Christi Memphis on January 8 will be time of prayer and celebration. During  celebration of the Eucharist members will have the opportunity to renew the Vow of Nonviolence. There will be a social following the renewal Mass.
        The next County Commission vote on the Wage Theft ordinance will be held on January 14th at the Shelby County Building, 1st Floor (Door to room located in the entry lobby of the building) 160 N. Main. Closest parking is Mud Island, $6.00. We will need support to get this passed, especially business owners and other people that are willing to speak on the morality of laws that protect the most vulnerable of our society, the poor day laborers.


    Agenda Items
    If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice and Janice Vanderhaar.

    Pax Christi Memphis
    News and Notes
    Number 8, 2012



    Ed Wallin, Janice Vanderhaar and Paul Crum spoke to a group of students at the University of Memphis Catholic Center on Oct. 14th. Ed shared his experiences as a campus priest, a civil rights worker and Army Chaplain in Vietnam. Janice presented a brief history of Pax Christi, explaining its origins, history and current mission. Paul shared his personal journey to Catholicism and peace activism, focusing on the spirituality of peacemaking. The students asked stimulating questions and discussed the possibility of forming a campus Pax Christi group.

    Report on Catholic Committee of the South
    On Saturday, October 27, Judy and Jerry Bettice joined the annual gathering of Catholic Committee of the South (CCS). The meeting was held at Christian Brothers University and attendees came from Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee and Ohio. The diversity of those assembled was reflected in the  lay Catholics, Glenmary Home Missioners, Dominicans and Benedictines who shared their concerns. CCS meets with bishops of the South to communicate the various issues that members are currently focusing on as the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops looks forward to its annual meeting. In addition to maintaining connections with southern bishops the organization aims at strengthening its network for promoting faith and justice especially among youth and persons at the grass roots.  The objective of meeting and communicating with church leaders is to establish a regional voice on the matters of concern.
        Each participant in the morning meeting was invited to express their particular concerns. A summary of these contributions follows:
    •    the Dream Act for undocumented youth who were brought to the U.S. at an early age;
    •    wage theft and living wage (addressed by a representative of Workers Interfaith Network);
    •    environmental degradation--by mountain top removal for coal mining; in byproducts of the proliferation of nuclear weapons; and by fracking to produce natural gas;
    •    treatment of incarcerated women, particularly those who are shackled while giving birth in prison;
    •    prison privatization and detention centers for undocumented immigrants;
    •    immigration reform and the public voice of the faith community addressing this issue;
    •    how the churches invest money and how they serve as voice for the poor;
    •    domestic violence and the condition of women as a priority of the Church;
    •    police-community relations and reconciliation;
    •    health care: commodity or human right?
        The importance of expanding the CCS network by addressing Catholic social teaching and the education of our youth was discussed in the course of the meeting. Materials describing "Building the World House" were distributed. Copies can be sent upon request (jbettice@earthlink.net).

    Coming Events
    Our next gathering of Pax Christi Memphis on November 13 will be a consideration of the proposal to establish a diocesan justice and peace committee. Fr. Tim Sullivan, Vicar for Social Ministries in the Diocese of Memphis, has been invited to attend and participate in the discussion of this proposal.

    Agenda Items
    If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice and Janice Vanderhaar.
    <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 7, 2012</span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">October 9th Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">The meeting opened with Bread Prayer. Various kinds of bread were presented in prayer to remind us of the hungers and needs of the world around us.</div><p style="text-align: center; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);"><span style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><table style="height: 151px; width: 492px; border-style: none; margin: 1px;"><tbody><tr><td style="border: 0px none; text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><img width="607" height="684" border="0" src="res;jsessionid=4D3E87F36B9237EAFF8F2AC8041D24FC.TCpfixus71a?name=al_kirk.JPG&type=image" style="width: 127px; height: 144px;" /></span></span> <br /></td><td style="vertical-align: top;"><br /></td><td style="vertical-align: top; text-align: left;">Msgr. Al Kirk addressed the members gathered at the Catholic Center near the University of Memphis and spoke about changes in the Diocese of Memphis. Most of his remarks concerned Catholic Charities of West Tennessee (CCWTN).<br />Funding of programs at CCWTN has become a major challenge leading to restructuring of the agency.<br />Parish Social Ministries is a recent development that is aimed at greater engagement of parishes in the mission of CCWTN. This component is directed toward four activities: formation in Catholic Social Teaching; gaining the participation of volunteers; networking parishes; and advocacy. <br /> <br /></td><td style="vertical-align: top;"><br /></td><td style="border: 0px none;"><br /></td></tr></tbody></table></span></span></p><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style><span style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 11px ! important; font-family: Verdana,sans-serif;">A number of programs of CCWTN have been dropped or will be terminated in coming months. These include refugee resettlement, and Sophia House. The latter has had low occupancy for some time. Services to immigrants seeking residency in the U.S. will continue. Refugee services are now provided by Catholic Charities of Nashville. Dozier House is facing funding problems and could close within the next year. </span><br /></span></span><div style="text-align: left;">Advocacy is not a primary focus of CCWTN, but the Tennessee Catholic Public Policy Commission deals with legislative matters in the Tennessee Legislature. <br />In the discussion that followed Fr. Kirk's presentation, the vision of Bishop Dozier was mentioned: Catholics in West Tennessee are to be the Good Samaritan on the banks of the Mississippi River. <br />A matter of concern that was raised was the need for pastoral care of Catholics at St. Peter Manor which belongs to Wesley Living, an outreach of the United Methodist Church. <br />A question arose about the ministry for peace and justice in the Diocese of Memphis. This question will receive further study in future meetings of Pax Christi Memphis.<br />The meeting closed with &quot;Prayer Before An Election.&quot;<br /><br /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">Litany of Resistance</span></font></span></font></span></span><br />One: For the victims of war<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: Women, men and children<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: The maimed and the crippled<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: The abandoned and the homeless<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: The imprisoned and the tortured<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: The widowed and the orphaned<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: The bleeding and the dying<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: The weary and the desperate<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: The lost and the forsaken<br />All: Have mercy<br />One: For those fleeing in terror<br />All: Have mercy<br />     <span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px ! important;">(Excerpt from prayer by Jim Loney of Christian Peacemaker Teams - <a href="http://www.cpt.org/"><span style="font-size: 8px;">www.cpt.org</span></a>)</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Events of Interest</span><br /> <span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">October 20</span> - Gandhi-King Conference at Bridges<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">October 21</span> - &quot;Innocent On Death Row&quot; at Church of the Holy Spirit, 2 p.m.<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">November 13</span> - free lecture at Lindenwood Christian Church by Walter Brueggemann<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">November 18</span> - Regional Dialogue for Pax Christi USA, to be attended by Altonette Stone as a member of the Pax Christi anti-racism team.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">The WORD</span><br />John 14:27 <br />Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid.<br /><br />John 16:33 <br />I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world.<br /><br />2 Corinthians 13:11<br />Finally, brothers and sisters, rejoice. Aim for restoration, comfort one another, agree with one another, live in peace; and the God of love and peace will be with you<br /><br /><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes within the souls of people when they realize their relationship, their oneness with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize that at the center of the universe dwells the Great Spirit, and that this center is really everywhere, it is within each of us.</span><br /><div style="text-align: right; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">-- Black Elk (1863-1950)<br /></div><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br /></div>If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 6, 2012</span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">August Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">The opening prayer was taken from the St. Louis regional dialogue with Sr. Patty Chappell, Director of Pax Christi USA.<br />Janice Vanderhaar provided some reflections on the meeting in St. Louis on July 28, 2012. Sr. Patty has made a definite move to go to the Pax Christi membership, and there is some question as to how our movement is organizing itself in regions, local groups, parishes and so on.<br />An outline of the purpose of the St. Louis gathering includes concern about mutual dialogue, communication, accountability around the four initiatives of Pax Christi USA, and the gathering of information that will be used to formulate an agenda for the National Assembly in 2013.<br />The four initiatives, in summary, are<br />1.    spirituality of nonviolence and peace making<br />2.    disarmament, demilitarization and reconciliation with justice<br />3.    economic and interracial justice in the U.S.<br />4.    human rights and global restoration. <br />A question posed by this dialogue is: who is missing at the table, or who are we to reach out to in our work for the peace of Christ? Another question raised is: how are we to walk with the poor and oppressed? <br />In our discussion of the work done in the regional dialogue, we addressed the issue of how our Memphis group might gain the status of a region of Pax Christi USA.<br />A second presentation was given by Altonette Stone in regard to her participation in the National Black Congress in Indianapolis. This gathering was attended by some 2000 delegates, including several Catholics of the Diocese of Memphis. Other attendees included Asian American Catholics as well as African American Catholics. Concerns of the Congress were evangelization; a Black Catholic agenda; coordination with Black Catholic bishops; faith and prayer; and youth.<br />Kathleen Glackin of the Catholic Campus Ministry gave a brief description of the ministry's Wednesday night programs. On October 24, Pax Christi Memphis will provide guest speakers for the students at the Center. Altonette Stone, Janice Vanderhaar, Ed Wallin and Paul Crum will present the four initiatives of Pax Christi USA.<br />Some business of the August meeting of Pax Christi Memphis included a treasurer's report and approval of some expenditures. $100 is going to the Workers Interfaith Network &quot;Faith and Labor Picnic.&quot; This contribution entitles our group to set up and information table with materials about our movement. $50 was pledged to the Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance (OREPA).  $100 for the Gandhi-King Conference was approved pending the announcement of the dates and venue for this event.<br />Members present also signed a letter to Senator Carl Levin, Chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, on behalf of OREPA asking for a halt to development of more bomb-making activity in Oak Ridge at the Y-12 plant.<br />Linda Raiteri and Altonette Stone have asked to rotate off the Pax Christi Memphis planning team. Judy Bettice and Janice Vanderhaar will remain on the team.<br /><br clear="all" /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">Local Author<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>Kristen Iversen has just published &quot;Full Body Burden: Growing up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats&quot;. She is now a resident of Cordova, Tennessee and will have three book signings in Memphis in the coming weeks: September 13 at the Pink Palace, September 14 at Burke's Books on South Cooper and on October 16 at Booksellers at Laurelwood. All of this information can be found, plus much more, on her web site: <a href="http://www.kristeniversen.com/">www.kristeniversen.com</a><br /><br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Coming Events</span><br /> <span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">September 3 - Faith and Labor Picnic for Workers Interfaith Network, 11 am - 2 pm at     Trinity Methodist Church grounds, Galloway and Evergreen, 2 blocks west of the Zoo<br />August 26 and Sundays throughout the school year - Mass at the Catholic Center on Mynders at 5 pm<br />September 11 - Ed Wallin will make a presentation at Theology On Tap. <br />October 9 - Fr. Al Kirk will address Pax Christi Memphis on changes in the Diocese of Memphis in relation to social justice</span><br /></span><br /></div><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">After reading Walter Brueggemann's<br />The Prophetic Imagination <br />    <span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px ! important;"><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Give unto Caesar . . . .</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Jesus lived in the Empire</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Jesus lived with Empire</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Jesus lived under Empire</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Jesus died at the hands of Empire</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">crushed by its dominion</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">with the connivance</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">of leaders of his spiritual nation</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">We live in Empire</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Empire pervades our lives </span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">with its greed-driven dealings</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">with its wars and intrigues</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">its drone murders and dominations</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">with its hatreds and hubris</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">What shall we render to Caesar?</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Where is Caesar leading us?</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Where is the voice </span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">of our spiritual nation?</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Where are the shepherds</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">who look like Jesus?</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Come to me</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">you who bear heavy burdens</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">under the oppressive thumb of Empire</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Come to me</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">and be my beloved community</span><br style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);" /><span style="color: rgb(238, 238, 238);">Render to God . . . .</span><br /> By Gerald Bettice</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br /></span></span></p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 5, 2012</span><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;">July Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><p style="text-align: center; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);" /><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">The prayer &quot;Celebrating the life of Fr. John Atkinson&quot; included memories shared by the members present.<br />Paul Crum presented slides from his recent mission trip to Trujillo, Honduras, along with a commentary about vivid memories of his time there. Paul joined the mission effort of Christ the King parish in Little Rock, Arkansas. His work was mostly in a pharmacy as part of the medical care given to people in the Trujillo area. <br />In the midst of his mission work Paul was immersed in a Spanish speaking environment, giving him practice in communicating with the local people. Relating to the people being served was surely the highlight of the whole experience. <br />Travel to and from the mission site included long bus rides that proved to be somewhat rigorous. Accommodations were also a challenge.<br />Paul described the tropical conditions around Trujillo, including termites, mosquitoes, iguanas and other creatures--including a bat in the pharmacy--that are part of the environment where the mission group was serving. <br />This trip was part of an ongoing partnership with Honduran people that spans 17 years. After each trip equipment is secured and stored for the next year's visit. Among the doctors of various specialties was a Muslim doctor who, along with people of various denominations, gave witness to interfaith collaboration in serving the people who needed medical care. <br />The church in the area where the mission group was working is kept alive by lay leadership in the face of limited clergy presence in the area.<br />The whole experience was woven together with prayer and joyful song led by local leaders, and accompanied by Paul on his guitar. <table style="height: 304px; width: 492px; border-style: none; margin: 1px;"><tbody><tr><td style="border: 0px none; text-align: center;"> <img width="180" height="288" border="0" src="res;jsessionid=ED1F57CC3712BACDA60BD6DA264C7FEE.TCpfixus72a?name=Virgen_de_suyapa.jpg&type=image" style="width: 180px; height: 288px; -moz-force-broken-image-icon: 1;" /></td><td style="border: 0px none; color: rgb(218, 224, 239);"><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px ! important;">Our Lady of Suyapa is the patroness of Honduras<br />An inscription on a poster with her image states: &quot;(We) cannot be called the children of Our Lady of Suyapa who cause violence and death. Stop the violence; respect life.&quot;</span></span></span></span></span><br /></div> </td></tr></tbody></table><br clear="all" /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;">National Dialogue on Pax Christi<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>The national leadership of Pax Christi USA is participating with Pax Christi members in dialogue about framing an agenda as our movement looks to the future. Sessions will be held in Saint Louis on July 28 and in Atlanta on August 15. Contact information at <a href="http://paxchristiusa.org/programs/regional-dialogues-2012-13/">http://paxchristiusa.org/programs/regional-dialogues-2012-13/</a><br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Coming Events</span><br /> <span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">August 14 - <span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Fr. Al Kirk</span> will address Pax Christi Memphis and speak about changes in the Diocese of Memphis and their impact on the work of social justice. </span><br style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">September 11 - <span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Ed Wallin</span> will make a presentation at Theology On Tap. Details will be     available next month.</span><br /></span><br /></div><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 4, 2012</span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">April Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">The members who gathered at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (our last meeting at this venue) viewed an episode from the video A Force More Powerful. This segment recounted the history of the lunch counter sit-ins by black students in Nashville, Tennessee, in the 1980's.<br />Members' responses to the film on the Nashville sit-ins:<br />&quot;The training and preparation of the protesters was impressive. In some sense all spiritual practice and religious education should aim to sensitize us to injustice and prepare us to confront it creatively and nonviolently.&quot; (Mike Watson)<br />&quot;I think Jim Lawson was totally convinced of the efficacy of nonviolence and through his certainty was able to persuade the students and train them in nonviolent methods. I think this requires tremendous courage and<br />integrity. I think he was centered and had integrated nonviolence principles. They were no longer something<br />outside of him. The need for training underlies the necessity of practice, of discipline. Disciples practice the <br />disciplines -- of prayer, of meditation, whatever. They rehearse. It is like any learning process. One keeps<br />doing it until it is part of one's way of being.&quot; (Linda Raiteri)<br /><br /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">May Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>Pax Christi Memphis inaugurated a new relationship with the Catholic Student Center at the University of Memphis by meeting in the Center's facility on Mynders Avenue. Ed Wallin gave a history of the Catholic Student Center and its stand against racism. Ed then introduced Sam Mauck, who is Director of Campus and Young Adult Ministries for the Diocese of Memphis. Sam spoke of priorities for campus ministry, namely, forming a faith community, justice, and leadership skills. Kathleen Glackin, Assistant Catholic Campus Minister, also spoke. Pax Christi members contributed to the discussion with questions and comments.<br />The assembled members gave a blessing to Paul Crum who will be participating in a mission trip to Trujillo, Honduras, in June. The prayers of Pax Christi Memphis will go with Paul. <br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">No meeting in June</span>  The next meeting of Pax Christi Memphis will be on July 10 at the Catholic Student Center.<br /><br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Member News</span><br /> <span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Father John Atkinson</span> is in residence at Allen Morgan Healthcare, # 256, 177 North Highland Street, 38111. This facility is part of the Trezevant Manor complex; the entrance to Allen Morgan is on Waynoka Avenue just off Highland Street. Father John's phone number is 515-2950.<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Jackie Dulle</span>, formerly of Pax Christi Memphis, lives now in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and has sent us notice of events related to the Los Alamos nuclear facility. &quot;Vision Without Fission&quot; takes place from August 3-6. This weekend is a collaboration of Pax Christi NM, Nuclear Watch NM, Occupy Santa Fe, Veterans for Peace SF, Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety, and Trinity Nuclear Abolition. Pax Christi Memphis is invited to participate in solidarity through prayer. A related website is found at <a href="http://nukefreenow.org/">http://NukeFreeNow.org</a> for those interested in participating in New Mexico. <br />  <span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><br />NATIONAL DIALOGUE ON PAX CHRISTI</span><br />The national leadership of Pax Christi USA is participating with Pax Christi members in dialogue about framing an agenda as our movement looks to the future. The following link gives dates and places for these discussions. <a href="http://paxchristiusa.org/programs/regional-dialogues-2012-13/">http://paxchristiusa.org/programs/regional-dialogues-2012-13/ </a><br /><br /><br /></div><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<br /><br /><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }p { margin-right: 0in; margin-left: 0in; font-size: 12pt; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <p style="margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt 0.25in; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: 'Comic Sans MS';">Prayer is the basis of all peacemaking precisely because in prayer we come to the realization that we do not belong to the world in which conflicts and wars take place, but to him who offers us his peace. (Henri Nouwen in <i>Peacework</i></span><span style="font-family: 'Comic Sans MS';">)</span></p><p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 4, 2012</span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">April Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">The members who gathered at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (our last meeting at this venue) viewed an episode from the video A Force More Powerful. This segment recounted the history of the lunch counter sit-ins by black students in Nashville, Tennessee, in the 1980's.<br />Members' responses to the film on the Nashville sit-ins:<br />&quot;The training and preparation of the protesters was impressive. In some sense all spiritual practice and religious education should aim to sensitize us to injustice and prepare us to confront it creatively and nonviolently.&quot; (Mike Watson)<br />&quot;I think Jim Lawson was totally convinced of the efficacy of nonviolence and through his certainty was able to persuade the students and train them in nonviolent methods. I think this requires tremendous courage and<br />integrity. I think he was centered and had integrated nonviolence principles. They were no longer something<br />outside of him. The need for training underlies the necessity of practice, of discipline. Disciples practice the <br />disciplines -- of prayer, of meditation, whatever. They rehearse. It is like any learning process. One keeps<br />doing it until it is part of one's way of being.&quot; (Linda Raiteri)<br /><br /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">May Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>Pax Christi Memphis inaugurated a new relationship with the Catholic Student Center at the University of Memphis by meeting in the Center's facility on Mynders Avenue. Ed Wallin gave a history of the Catholic Student Center and its stand against racism. Ed then introduced Sam Mauck, who is Director of Campus and Young Adult Ministries for the Diocese of Memphis. Sam spoke of priorities for campus ministry, namely, forming a faith community, justice, and leadership skills. Kathleen Glackin, Assistant Catholic Campus Minister, also spoke. Pax Christi members contributed to the discussion with questions and comments.<br />The assembled members gave a blessing to Paul Crum who will be participating in a mission trip to Trujillo, Honduras, in June. The prayers of Pax Christi Memphis will go with Paul. <br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">No meeting in June</span>  The next meeting of Pax Christi Memphis will be on July 10 at the Catholic Student Center.<br /><br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Member News</span><br /> <span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Father John Atkinson</span> is in residence at Allen Morgan Healthcare, # 256, 177 North Highland Street, 38111. This facility is part of the Trezevant Manor complex; the entrance to Allen Morgan is on Waynoka Avenue just off Highland Street. Father John's phone number is 515-2950.<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Jackie Dulle</span>, formerly of Pax Christi Memphis, lives now in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and has sent us notice of events related to the Los Alamos nuclear facility. &quot;Vision Without Fission&quot; takes place from August 3-6. This weekend is a collaboration of Pax Christi NM, Nuclear Watch NM, Occupy Santa Fe, Veterans for Peace SF, Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety, and Trinity Nuclear Abolition. Pax Christi Memphis is invited to participate in solidarity through prayer. A related website is found at <a href="http://nukefreenow.org/">http://NukeFreeNow.org</a> for those interested in participating in New Mexico. <br />  <span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><br />NATIONAL DIALOGUE ON PAX CHRISTI</span><br />The national leadership of Pax Christi USA is participating with Pax Christi members in dialogue about framing an agenda as our movement looks to the future. The following link gives dates and places for these discussions. <a href="http://paxchristiusa.org/programs/regional-dialogues-2012-13/">http://paxchristiusa.org/programs/regional-dialogues-2012-13/ </a><br /><br /><br /></div><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<br /><br /><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }p { margin-right: 0in; margin-left: 0in; font-size: 12pt; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <p style="margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt 0.25in; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: 'Comic Sans MS';">Prayer is the basis of all peacemaking precisely because in prayer we come to the realization that we do not belong to the world in which conflicts and wars take place, but to him who offers us his peace. (Henri Nouwen in <i>Peacework</i></span><span style="font-family: 'Comic Sans MS';">)</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 3, 2012</span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">February Activity<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">Pax Christi Memphis viewed <span style="font-style: italic;">The Interrupters</span>, a film about the moving and surprising stories of three Violence Interrupters who try to protect their Chicago communities from the violence they once experienced. <br />There was no formal meeting, but members watched this video at home, sometimes with others from our chapter invited to share the presentation.<br /><br /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">March Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>The members present engaged in dialogue on the matter of the future venue(s) of our meetings. The pro's and con's of continuing to meet at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception or at the Church of the Holy Spirit were brought forth. The question of the need for us to grow, especially by attracting other Catholics, was brought forth.  A similar point was made about our future and the invitation of young people to join us. Other aspects of the dialogue included the fact that the Latin name &quot;Pax Christi&quot; has little meaning for many people and that there is need to identify ourselves as promoting the peace of Christ. Getting the word out to make know what we are really about was emphasized. Some people see us as a fringe group or as aligned with a single political party. In summary, the decision as to where we will continue to meet was referred to the Pax Christi Memphis planning team.     <br />In the study portion of the meeting the assembled members viewed the film Franz Jägerstätter: A Man of Conscience. Discussion followed.<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Did you know?</span><br /> There is a proposal for the U.S. federal budget that addressed the common good.<br />Check out &quot;Priorities for a Faithful Budget: Acting with Mercy and Justice as One Nation Under God&quot; (faithfulbudget.org) as a much better model for Congress to use than the House/Ryan budget. The Faithful Budget focuses on our national needs and priorities, and promotes a compassionate and comprehensive vision for the future. It was created by a national coalition of interfaith organizations.  <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><br />COMING EVENTS</span><br />• CMIRA (Christian Memphians for Immigration Reform) meets monthly; check with Judy Bettice for more information.<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Reflection</span> <br />From Dr. Ada Maria Isasi-Diaz, this year's speaker at the Vanderhaar Symposium who spoke on solidarity and compassion: &quot;One reason solidarity is all the more relevant is that now we live in this globalized world. When we talk about globalization, we always talk about money, capital, crossing borders back and forth. We never stop to look at the people who make globalization possible: the immigrants from all over the world who constantly cross borders back and forth.&quot; (sojo.net/magazine/2012/03/faith-tipping-point)<br /><br /></div><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 2, 2012</span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;">January Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">All present signed a letter to Memphis City Council member Shea Flinn as a way of giving our moral support for leaders willing to address creative alternatives to violence. <br />A very good discussion of the concluding chapters of Jesus and Nonviolence, focused the challenge of our call to nonviolence since the events of September 11, 2001. We also identified ways and places where the Spirit is at work in transforming the world.<br />A suggestion was put forth that we develop a covenant for our local group based on the Vow of Nonviolence, post it at every meeting, and hold ourselves accountable for our faithfulness, or not, to nonviolence in speech and actions. This would be an effort to be more sensitive to each others’ differences within our own group. We agreed to take this up at a future meeting, perhaps making it the centerpiece of that meeting, to keep the practice of our Vow fresh in our ongoing relationships.<br />News items: Judy and Janice serve on the 30th Anniversary Planning Committee for the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center; Judy and Ed Wallin serve on the Planning Committee for the Ray McGovern appearance on Feb 23rd at First Congo. Pax Christi is co-sponsoring the event with Veterans for Peace.<br />Pax Christi Memphis has sent $100 from the treasury and a list of member names to Pax Christi USA for a 2012 group membership.<br />Those gathered stood to renew Vow of Nonviolence; most, if not all, signed the form and gave it to Janice to forward to the national office. Judy agreed to get paper copies to people not in attendance, and ask them to return it to Janice within one week if they wanted to have theirs included in the mailing to Pax Christi USA.<br />Then we had a PARTY!<br /><br /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;">February<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>View at home or at a venue of your choice &quot;The Interrupters&quot; which is a two-hour documentary that follows three former gang members – two men and one woman - as they intervene in various street conflicts to defuse violence. They are part of a Chicago program to reduce urban violence.  (WKNO, February 14, 8 pm.)<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Did you know?</span><br /> What the connection is between Dr. Jonas Salk and the Tuskegee Institute?<br />When you read <span style="font-style: italic;">The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</span> by Rebecca Skloot you will know. This book is recommended for Black History Month.<br />Also recommended: <span style="font-style: italic;">The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration</span> by Isabel Wilkerson. The author will speak at the U of M Fogelman Center on March 1, sponsored by Facing History and Ourselves.<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Reminder</span><br />Local dues (never too late) are $15 per person, $20 per couple or $5 for those on a limited income. Please send your checks made out &quot;Pax Christi Memphis&quot; to 4043 Allison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38122. <br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">COMING EVENTS</span><br />• CMIRA (Christian Memphians for Immigration Reform) meets monthly on the first Friday, at noon. Location varies from month to month. Contact Judy Bettice for more information (327-8068).<br />• February 23: Veterans for Peace present Ray McGovern, retired CIA officer, at 7:30 PM, First Congregational Church.<br />• Vanderhaar Symposium, March 15, 2012 -  &quot;Compassion and Solidarity: Struggling for Justice, Building Peace&quot;  with Dr. Ida Maria Isasi-Diaz, Professor Emeritus of Christian Social Ethics and Theology at Drew University Theological School. First Congregational Church, 1000 South Cooper, at 7 PM.<br /><br /></div><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 1, 2012</span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">December Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">Our meeting took place at the home of Jerry and Judy Bettice. Chapters 3 and 4 in Jesus and Nonviolence: A Third Way by Walter Wink were the focus of our discussion. Small groups and later the entire assembly were encouraged to reflect on the material in Wink's book in relation to the OCCUPY MOVEMENT. No formal record of the points raised was made for this brief summary.<br /><br /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">January 10 Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>Please study chapters 5 and 6 in Jesus and Nonviolence: A Third Way by Walter Wink in preparation for a brief discussion of these concluding portions of the book.<br />Members present will join in renewing of the Vow of Non-Violence. See our website for the text of the vow: <a href="preview;jsessionid=6E49E58CF86DA0E8F07B5003F797541C.TCpfixus70a?page=7&mode=preview">http:www.paxchristimemphis.org/7.html</a>; paper copies for private use can be obtained from Pax Christi Memphis, 4043 Allison Avenue, 38122. We will celebrate with a social and simple refreshments that members bring to share. The planning team will provide beverages, napkins, plates, etc.<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Did you know?</span><br /> &quot;Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger.&quot; This statement is also part of the subtitle of The Spirit Level by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett. The publisher is Bloomsbury Press, and the book can be found in the public library. Thirty years' research in this work is based on public health data from the United States and several other countries. &quot;...More unequal societies are bad for everyone within them--the rich and middle class as well as the poor.&quot; (This latter quote is taken from inside the front of the book jacket.)<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">COMING EVENTS</span><br />· CMIRA (Christian Memphians for Immigration Reform) will meet on January 6, at noon, in Christ Community Health Center, Central at Hollywood. Bring a bag lunch.<br />· January 14, 2012 - 30th Anniversary Dinner for the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center at First Congregational Church, 1000 South Cooper. 6 PM Banquet, 7 PM featured speaker Noam Chomsky.<br />· February 23: Veterans for Peace present Ray McGovern, retired CIA officer, at 7 PM, First Congregational Church.<br />· Vanderhaar Symposium, March 15, 2012 -  &quot;Compassion and Solidarity: Struggling for Justice, Building Peace&quot;  with Dr. Ida Maria Isasi-Diaz, Professor Emeritus of Christian Social Ethics and Theology at Drew University Theological School. Christian Brothers University in the University Theater at 7 PM.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Reflection for this Political Season</span><br />If we are to engage in serious dialogue about the relationship between Christian faith and our political commitments, we must invest more energy in bringing scripture to bear on them. We must attempt to understand what scripture is actually saying rather than carelessly bend ing it to fit our political agendas. That does not mean, of course, that there will not continue to be debate about what given texts mean. But we should, and must, engage in a more seri ous treatment of biblical narratives. (Charles E. Gutenson in Sojourners of April 2011)<br /><br style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;" /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Support Pax Christi Memphis</span><br />It is time for the annual appeal for your support as members of Pax Christi Memphis. The suggested levels of support are: single members, $15 per year; couples, $20; and students or those on limited income, $5. Please send your checks made out &quot;Pax Christi Memphis&quot; to 4043 Allison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38122; or bring your cash or check to the January 10 meeting.<br /></div><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 11, 2011</span><br /></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">November Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">Twelve members of Pax Christi Memphis enjoyed the hospitality of the First Tuesday Potluck of the Catholic Ministry With Gay and Lesbian Persons (CMGLP) on November 8 at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. In an afterdinner program from the CMGLP group, speakers gave reports on their experience of the recent conference of the Catholic Association of Lesbian and Gay Ministries in Albany, New York.  Topics referred to included the issue of bullying. Another report spoke of the phenomenon of latinoa (a demographic term coined to  include both male and female persons) culture in the U.S. Latinoa culture is centered in the family with the abuelas or grandmothers having a central role. One striking remark regarding culture cited a crisis in today's Catholic church stemming from eurocentrism. The program presented by CMGLP concluded with the short film Lovefield. A brief discussion of the film took place in the large assembly, but other discussions went on during dessert. The film can be viewed at <a href="http://www.noob.us/entertainment/lovefield-a-short-film-by-mathieu-ratthe/">www.noob.us/entertainment/lovefield-a-short-film-by-mathieu-ratthe/</a>.<br /><br />In welcoming Pax Christi the CMGLP group lived up very well to its mission of providing a ministry of hospitality. Our prayer during the potluck meeting included this petition: &quot;Lord, may we, your people, collect our hopes, dreams and love so as to work on behalf of those who are in need of justice.&quot;<br /> <br /><span style="position: relative;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;" class="Apple-style-span">December Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></span>The meeting room at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception is not available due to a parish event. Meeting time and place are listed at the top of this newsletter.<br /><br />Discussion during the meeting will focus on chapters 3 and 4 in Jesus and Nonviolence: A Third Way by Walter Wink. Our conversation will be related to the Occupy Movement. Members are encouraged to follow news stories about Occupy and its activities. Copies of the Pax Christi USA statement related to the Movement have been sent to the Memphis Pax Christi members by email and it is available on line at  <a href="http://paxchristiusa.org/2011/11/15/occupy-pcusa-executive-director-responds-to-the-forced-removal-of-occupy-protesters/">http://paxchristiusa.org/2011/11/15/occupy-pcusa-executive-director-responds-to-the-forced-removal-of-occupy-protesters/</a><br />There are two copies of the Wink book available; call 327-8068.<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Did you know?</span><br /> Pax Christi USA has a new Executive Director; she is Sister Patricia Chappell, SNDdeN. The planning team has sent a note of congratulations to Sister Patricia on behalf of the Pax Christi Memphis community. Learn more about her <a href="http://paxchristiusa.org/about/staff/">http://paxchristiusa.org/about/staff/</a>.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">COMING EVENTS</span><br />· BEFRIENDING THE ENEMY, A RETREAT WITH KATHY KELLY<br />December 2-4 2011, Friday, 7 p.m. to Sunday Noon<br />WHERE: The Rushton Center, Midfield, AL Walnut Grove United Methodist Church<br />COST: $65 for the weekend if you stay overnight. $60 for the weekend, days only. Both include all meals.<br />To register: Call 205-780-2020 or write 2107 Ave G. Birmingham, AL 35218<br />Email: <a href="mailto:SHELLEYD9@JUNO.COM">SHELLEYD9@JUNO.COM</a><br />· 30th Anniversary Dinner for the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center<br />January 14, 2012 (Save the date; time and place will be announced.)<br />Featured speaker will be Noam Chomsky<br /> <br /><br style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;" /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Support Pax Christi Memphis</span><br />Our annual solicitation for your support as members of Pax Christi Memphis will be made in January, 2012. The suggested levels of support are: single members, $15 per year; couples, $20; and students or those on limited income, $5. <br /></div><br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 10, 2011</span><br /></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;">October Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;">Jose Davila and George Grider from Veterans for Peace requested that Pax Christi Memphis join with Veterans for Peace, the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center, and other local organizations as co-sponsors of Ray McGovern’s (see background below) appearance in Memphis, at First Congregational Church in February 2012. There was no dissent expressed; the Planning Team will discuss the amount of financial support to be contributed by Pax Christi Memphis.  <br />Ray McGovern works with Tell the Word, the publishing arm of the ecumenical Church of the Saviour in Washington, DC. During his career as a CIA analyst, he prepared and briefed the President's Daily Brief and chaired National Intelligence Estimates. He is a member of the Steering Group of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS).<br /><br />The eleven members present shared in small groups a discussion on a section of the book Jesus and Nonviolence: A Third Way. Afterward, one member of each group gave a report on the discussion.<br />Members agreed to join the ministry to GLBTs potluck and program on November 8 in place of the regular PC meeting. Those attending the potluck are welcome to bring a dinner dish or dessert to share.<br />Pax Christi Memphis will be showing its support of the ministry with gays and lesbians announced in the May 19, 2005 West Tennessee Catholic column of Bishop Steib, &quot;Church Is Home To All People of God.&quot; (Also available from the planning team or at <a href="http://www.cdom.org/gayandlesbianpersons/news.htm">http://www.cdom.org/gayandlesbianpersons/news/htm</a>)<br /><br /></div><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Report on the October 21-23 Gandhi King Conference -<br />&quot;A Living Movement&quot;, Toward a world of peace, solidarity, and justice</span><br />The 2011 conference was attended members and supporters of our local Pax Christi chapter including Pat and Paul Crum, Jerry and Judy Bettice, Ed Wallin, Janice Vanderhaar, Marjorie Steakley, Randy Gamble and Art Sutherland. The Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA) joined the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center in presenting this year's program, and there was good attendance from the PJSA and the local community. On the first day, over 400 young people participated in a program designed for them.<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis was represented by a table of information in the exhibit area of the conference. At least one presenter made a special mention in gratitude for our chapter's cosponsorship of the conference. A number of informal contacts with our members at the meetings indicated interest in our group and our mission. <br /><br />Very impressive keynote speakers and workshops contributed to the quality experience of those attending the conference. Some of the conference workshops confirmed that nonviolence as a means of achieving peace is on the rise and is considered most effective. In the Commercial Appeal of Sunday, October 23, coincidentally, an article entitled &quot;New research finds peace breaking out in the world.&quot;  In the same issue another article, &quot;Blogging toward peaceful protests,&quot; featured the Occupy Wall Street protests and one of the workshops of the Gandhi-King Conference.<br /><br />This newsletter is accompanied by a separate and more detailed report on this year's conference.   <br /><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }p.MsoNoteLevel2, li.MsoNoteLevel2, div.MsoNoteLevel2 { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span>   </span></span> <br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Coming Events </span> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">November 18-20, 2011</span> - Shut Down the School of Assassins; converge at the gates of Fort Benning, Georgia<br />(SOAW.ORG)<br />BEFRIENDING THE ENEMY, A RETREAT WITH KATHY KELLY<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">December 2-4 2011</span>, Friday, 7 p.m. to Sunday Noon<br />WHERE: The Rushton Center, Midfield, AL Walnut Grove United Methodist Church<br />COST: $65 for the weekend if you stay overnight. $60 for the weekend, days only Both include all meals.<br />To register: Call 205-780-2020 or write 2107 Ave G. Birmingham, AL 35218<br />Email: SHELLEYD9@JUNO.COM<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Did you know?</span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">The Highlander Research and Education Center in east Tennessee is still training people for grassroots activism and that Memphians have been getting the benefit of the programs there.</span><br style="font-weight: bold;" /><span style="font-weight: bold;">The founding principle and guiding philosophy of Highlander is that the answers to the problems facing society lie in the experiences of ordinary people. Those experiences, so often belittled and denigrated in our society, are the keys to grassroots power.</span> (<a href="http://www.highlandercenter.org/about.asp">http:www.highlandercenter.org/about.asp</a>)<br /><br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />     If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 9, 2011<br /></span></p><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-family: Georgia,serif; font-style: italic;">I have  never kept your justice hidden within myself, but I have spoken of your faithfulness and saving help;</span><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-family: Georgia,serif; font-style: italic;"> I have made no secret of your love and faithfulness, O God. (Ps 40)</span><br /></div><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;">September Meeting<br /></span></font></span></font></span></div><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span">A period of prayer and reflection entitled &quot;From Anguish to Hope&quot; focused on the events and aftermath of the attacks of September 11, 2001.<br />The fifteen members present shared afterward on nonviolent actions taken in the month leading up to the meeting. <br />Brad Watkins, Organizing Director at the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center, addressed the assembly and discussed the status of the efforts being directed on behalf of the homeless in Memphis. In our city there is a deficiency in the number of shelters for homeless persons. Brad asserted that housing people without shelter is less costly than doing nothing. He also discussed a number of justice issues such as revolving prison doors for homeless persons who are arrested for various reasons and the activity of what might be called predatory service providers. The hope for those dealing with the challenges of our population of persons in need of stable housing is that we have one year to convince the City and the County to give priority to providing necessary measures for providing housing and other appropriate services for those who are homeless now. Opportunities to serve at the September 16, 2011 Project Homeless Connect were announced.</font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;"><br /></div><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Support for Y12 Resistors in Prison</span><br />(The following comes to us from the Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance (OREPA)<br />You may write to those serving sentences for actions at the Y12 plant in Oak Ridge.<br />They might be moved without notice and your letter might be returned to you. Current information about their places of incarceration can be found  at <a href="http://www.nukeresister.org/">www.nukeresister.org</a> or www.orepa.org.<br />Matthew 25:39 - <span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic;">Jesus says: I was in prison, and you visited me.</span><br /> <br />Paula Elizabeth Rosdatter, No. 10660<br />Bonnie Urfer, No. 8957<br />Steve Baggarty, No. 8955<br />Irwin County Detention Center<br />132 Cotton Drive<br />Ocilla, GA 31774<br /> <br />Michael Walli<br />Dennis DuVall<br />Blount County Adult Detention Center<br />920 E Lamar Alexander Parkway<br />Maryville, TN 37804-5002<br /> <br />The Y12 Resisters appreciate all the support they receive, but it is clear that each of them places the highest priority on the continuing work to stop nuclear weapons production in all the places it happens across the country, so we urge you to connect with groups working on these issues and dedicate a meaningful part of your time and resources to this work!<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Coming Events </span> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">October 11, 2011</span> - The next meeting of Pax Christi Memphis will take place at 6:45 pm in Marian Hall of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. 1) Walter Wink's Jesus and Nonviolence, chapters 1 and 2, will be discussed. 2) George Grider and Jose Davila will make a presentation concerning a future event focused on the current wars that our government is engaged in.<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">October 13, 2011</span> - Planning session at the MidSouth Peace and Justice Center, 1000 South Cooper, at 6:00 pm.<br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">October 21 - 23, 2011</span> - Gandhi/King Conference on Nonviolence at CBU.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Agenda Items</span><br />     If you have anything you want to have discussed at our regular meeting, contact one of the members of the planning team at least ten days before the next meeting. Team members are Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 8, 2011<br /></span></p><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;">Outreach</span></font></span></font></span></div><div style="text-align: left; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fefff1" class="Apple-style-span">On August 2, Judy and Jerry Bettice made a presentation about Pax Christi to the Ministry with Gays and Lesbians of the Diocese of Memphis at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Materials about Pax Christi USA and Pax Christi Memphis were displayed and made available; and among the table decorations were origami peace cranes made by members of our chapter. Members and supporters of Pax Christi Memphis also attended the monthly potluck event that included the presentation.</font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <div style="text-align: left;"><br /></div><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">August Meeting</span><br /><blockquote style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Times; line-height: normal; font-size: medium;" /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Calibri; line-height: normal; font-size: 16px;"><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">      Sixteen were in attendance for our local chapter meeting on August 9, the 66th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki. The main part of the meeting and the </font></span></font><b><i><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">prayer </font></span></font></i></b><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">time focused on the legacy of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the issue of nuclear armaments today. Our </font></span></font><b><i><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">study</font></span></font></i></b><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span"> included a brief history of the &quot;hidden Christians&quot; and the suffering of the Christians in Japan over some 300 years. A presentation based on the recent speech of Archbishop Francis Chullikatt, the Papal Nuncio to the United Nations, outlined current Catholic teaching on nuclear weapons and emphasized the Church's strong support for the complete elimination of such weapons from the face of the earth.  The </font></span></font><b><i><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">action</font></span></font></i></b><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span"> portion of the meeting was devoted to signing letters to the two Tennessee Senators and to President Obama making an appeal in harmony with the position of the Church in regard to nuclear weapons. Members were encouraged to their representatives in Congress on and individual basis.</font></span></font></span><br /><blockquote style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Times; line-height: normal; font-size: medium;" /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(251, 255, 242); font-family: Verdana; line-height: normal;">The members present approved a sponsorship of $100 for the Faith and Labor Picnic of the Workers Interfaith Network. Our sponsorship of the event on September 5 allows us to have an information booth at the picnic along with admissions to the picnic for volunteers who will be in the booth to greet picnic goers.</span><br /><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">A sponsorship of $300 for the Gandhi-King Conference On Nonviolence in October was also approved. Details on this event will be forthcoming in the near future.</font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Calibri; line-height: normal; font-size: 16px;"><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">Judy Bettice displayed a copy of </font></span></font><i><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span">The Nonviolent Jesus</font></span></font></i><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span"> by Walter Wink. This little volume will be used in the future as the basis of a study by our local chapter. Copies will be available for $8.00 at our September meeting.</font></span></font></span><div><font face="Verdana" color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="line-height: normal;"><br /></span></font></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 16px;"><font size="3" class="Apple-style-span"></font></span><font face="Verdana" color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="line-height: normal;"><blockquote style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Times; font-size: medium;" /><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Calibri; font-size: 16px;"><em><span lang="EN"><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#9bf8ff" class="Apple-style-span">Remarks by Archbishop Francis Chullikatt</font></span></font></span></em></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Calibri; font-size: 16px;"><i><span lang="EN"><em><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#9bf8ff" class="Apple-style-span">Kansas City, 1 July 2011</font></span></font></em></span></i></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Calibri; font-size: 16px;"><em><span lang="EN"><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#9bf8ff" class="Apple-style-span">(Emphasis added)</font></span></font></span></em></span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; line-height: 14px;"><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#9bf8ff" class="Apple-style-span">I think it is appropriate to restate the position of the Holy See expressed back in 1997, that “If biological weapons, chemical weapons, and now landmines can be done away with, so too can nuclear weapons.” This is the challenge before the international community today. It is </font></span></font><i><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#9bf8ff" class="Apple-style-span">the challenge before the Church today</font></span></font></i><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#9bf8ff" class="Apple-style-span">, and it is the challenge facing all people of goodwill today, believers and non believers alike.</font></span></font></span></span></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" color="#fbfff2" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="line-height: normal;"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; line-height: 14px;"><font size="3" face="Verdana" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#9bf8ff" class="Apple-style-span"></font></span></font></span></span></font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(155, 248, 255); font-family: Verdana;">As someone wrote, in the 18th and 19th centuries individuals fought for the abolition of slavery because they understood that every human being has the God-given right to live in freedom and dignity. In the end, slavery was brought to an end. In today’s world, we confront an issue of even greater importance: the possible annihilation of human species and human civilization by nuclear explosion. <i>So, together we should work to build a world free or nuclear weapons.</i> A world without nuclear weapons is not only possible, it has now become urgent.</span></div><div><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Coming Events in September</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(255, 248, 255); font-family: Tahoma; line-height: normal;">The 2011 Peace and Harmony Days in Memphis will be observed on September 21-23 at the Pho Da Temple, 3925 Hawkins Mill Road. Janice Vanderhaar will serve on an interfaith panel exploring the ways various faiths practice and encourage peace.</span><br /><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-style: normal; display: inline; font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: small; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;"><div dir="ltr"><div style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 12pt;"><span style="position: relative;"><div style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span><font size="3" face="Tahoma" class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 11px;"><font color="#fff8ff" class="Apple-style-span">The next meeting of Pax Christi Memphis will take place on September 13 at 6:45 pm in Marian Hall of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception.</font></span></font></span></div></span></div></div></div></div></div></div><p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: normal; line-height: 14px; font-size: 11px;" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 7, 2011<br /></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Fr. John Atkinson will be moving to a new residence, and when his address and phone number are available that information will be forwarded to the local group.<br /><font face="Verdana, Arial, sans-serif" class="Apple-style-span"><br /></font></span></span></span>We will gather at 6:45 p.m at the Cathedral, Marian Hall. The formal meeting will start at 7:00 p.m. and will end at 8:30 p.m.  <br />This day is the anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki.<br />If anyone has an agenda item or wishes to make a request for time to make announcements, contact Linda Raiteri in advance of the meeting date. She can be contacted at <a style="font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif ! important; font-style: normal ! important; font-size: 11px; font-weight: normal ! important; text-decoration: underline ! important; color: rgb(255, 255, 255) ! important;" href="mailto:lraiteri@bellsouth.net">lraiteri@bellsouth.net</a> or 901-324-9469.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">July 12th Meeting</span><br />Eleven members attended this gathering, and absent members were remembered by greetings they sent or by mention of other activities in which they were engaged.<br />Our study was an interactive reflection process based on reading out loud the text of Matthew 11:16-30. <br />Members present signed a letter of support for those praying in the desert of New Mexico on July 16 at the site of the first detonation of the atomic bomb. A second letter of solidarity in prayer has been sent to those witnessing for peace in sack cloth and ashes on July 29 and 30 at Los Alamos where nuclear weapons are produced until now.<br />The assembled group reached consensus on making a $50 donation from Pax Christi Memphis to OREPA* in support of their efforts to prevent the construction of a new nuclear weapons plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.<br />*Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance <a style="font-family: Verdana,Arial,sans-serif ! important; font-style: normal ! important; font-size: 11px; font-weight: normal ! important; text-decoration: underline ! important; color: rgb(255, 255, 255) ! important;" href="http://orepa.org">http://orepa.org</a><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Outreach</span><br />The Ministry with Gays and Lesbians in the Diocese of Memphis has invited Judy and Jerry Bettice to speak at their monthly potluck on August 2 at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Members of Pax Christi Memphis are invited to attend and enjoy good food and share in fellowship before and after the presentation. The meal begins at 6:30 pm and prayer and the talk follow.<br />Mark your Calendars: Workers Interfaith Network will hold its annual Labor Day picnic on September 5. At this event Pax Christi, as a sponsor, is welcome to display materials related to our mission for justice and peace. The picnic takes place at Trinity Methodist Church from 11 am until 2 pm.<br />        </span></span></span></p><p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 6, 2011<br /></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br />June Meeting</span></b></span> – <style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style>14 members were in attendance for our inaugural meeting at the Catedral of the Immaculate Conception.<br />Before the prayer experience the assembled group shared positive experiences of peace.<br />After the prayer, there was a presentation by various members recounting experiences with homeless persons in different settings:<br />Ed Wallen with veterans; Nic Catrambone at the St. Vincent de Paul soup kitchen; Jerry Bettice at Genesis House; Carol Carson at Dismas House; and Randy Gamble with person experience of being homeless.<br />The members present were encouraged to continue to contact the Memphis City Council to adequately fund the Mayors' plan to end homelessness.<br /><style>@font-face { }@font-face { }@font-face { }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }</style> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">July 12th Meeting</span><br />We will gather at 6:45 p.m. The formal meeting will start at 7:00 p.m. and will end at 8:30 p.m. This schedule will be followed at all future meetings.<br />If anyone has an agenda item or wishes to make a request for time to make announcements, contact Linda Raiteri in advance of the meeting date. She can be contacted at lraiteri@bellsouth.net or 901-324-9469.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Membership</span><br />If you think that you have not paid dues for a while, please send money or give it to the treasurer at the monthly meeting. Dues are generally collected at the same time that we renew the vow of nonviolence at the beginning of the calendar year. Single members are asked to contribute $15 per year, couples $20 and students or those on limited income $5.<br />        <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Gandhi-King Conference</span><br />This year's conference, &quot;A Living Movement: Toward a World of Peace, Solidarity, and Justice&quot; will be held at Christian Brothers University on October 21, 22 and 23, 2011.<br />Keynote speakers will include Delores Huerta who with Cesar Chavez cofounded the United Farm Workers movement.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">From the Planning Team</span><br />This year will be a process of discernment for Pax Christi Memphis with the spirituality of peacemaking and nonviolence as our focus and how we can grow both inward and reach outward, with a retreat in May.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Recommended Reading</span><br />·    No Future Without Forgiveness by Desmond Tutu<br />·    The Prophetic Imagination by Walter Brueggemann<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Nonviolent Action</span><br />Women (and men) gather to stand in grief and nonviolence with &quot;Women In Black&quot; for the cause of peace every Wednesday at noon in front of First Congregational Church, 1000 Cooper Street.<br /><br /><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">From Dominican theologian Edward Schillebeecks: The peace of Christ in our time consists in an inward discontent, in a prophetic protest against the way things are because they are precisely not right as they are.</span></p><p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 5, 2011<br /></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br />May Meeting</span></b></span> – 17 members and guests were in attendance.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Prayer and study</span><br />The meeting opened with a prayer service entitled “Lead Us To Peace, O God.” Our prayer time included a renewal of the Vow of Nonviolence.<br />Jacob Flowers of the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center (MSPJC) was our guest speaker, and he provided background and information on the Mayors’ 10-year plan to end homelessness in Memphis and Shelby County. The MSPJC is organizing efforts around the issues of unjust treatment of the homeless and advocating for comprehensive solutions to homelessness rather than efforts to criminalize homelessness. Currently, there is no funding to support the Mayors’ plan. Jacob asked that Pax Christi members call council members to request that the City Council provide the funding needed to make the plan effective.<br />Action<br />Members of our community brought food items to donate to the food pantry of the Church of the Holy Spirit as a gesture of appreciation for hosting our meeting for the past many years that we had been meeting there.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">June Meeting</span><br />Our inaugural meeting at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception will take place on June 14, starting at 6:45 in Marian Hall. The meeting area is handicap accessible. Entrance is on the west side of the church building. There will be ample lighted parking and security.<br />        <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">World Refugee Day</span><br />Catholic Charities of West Tennessee will celebrate World Refugee Day on Saturday June 25, 2011 at Christian Brothers University in the University Theater, 12 noon to 2 p.m.<br />Throughout America’s great history, refugees—forced to flee their homes because of religious, political, ethnic and other forms of persecution—have started their lives anew in the United States. Catholic Charities welcomes approximately 200 refugees annually. The United Nations sets aside one day a year to remember the 42 million uprooted people around the world who are struggling with their day to day lives.<br />The celebration will include refugees resettled locally here in Memphis by Catholic Charities of West Tennessee.  There will be a program highlighting our refugees, music, food and a chance to meet some of our refugees.  This promises to be a worthwhile event.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Planning</span><br />Altonette Stone requests volunteers to help with preparing prayer for monthly meetings.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">CMIRA</span><br /> Christian Memphians for Immigration Reform Association meets monthly on each First Friday at noon to plan action and discuss current legislation affecting immigrants in the Memphis area and around the nation. The next meeting will be on July 1, noon, at the Christ Community Health Center at 2599 Central Avenue (at Hollywood). Three members of Pax Christi Memphis attended the June meeting.<br /> “So, one role of CMIRA is to attempt to begin a civil dialogue among all people, especially people of faith, regarding the facts of immigration.  Much of the public discussion is often fear based, not fact based; rhetoric, not dialogue; and mean-spirited instead of spirit-filled.” (<a href="http//:cmiraonline.com">http//:cmiraonline.com</a>)<br /> <br />Follow us on the Pax Christi Memphis website: www.paxchristimemphis.org. You may contact us there.</p><div style="text-align: left;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px ! important;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;"><span style="font-size: 12px ! important;">Our last meeting at </span></span><a href="http://www.hspirit.com/"><span style="font-size: 12px ! important;">Church of the Holy Spirit</span></a> was on May 3rd. Members brought canned goods and staple food items to contribute to Holy Spirit's food pantry to show our appreciation for their many years of hosting Pax Christi Memphis. We will be forever grateful to Holy Spirit for their hospitality and for so generously providing us with a meeting place.</span></span><br /></div><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 4, 2011<br /></span></p><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">April Meeting</span></b></span> – 13 members were in attendance.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Prayer and study</span><br />Sr. Nic Catrambone led the evening prayer based on Psalm 139. She then presented some key ideas from The Gift of Years by Joan Chittister, OSB.  Aging gracefully and gaining wisdom through life experience were key ideas in the presentation.<br />Small groups of two and three shared their personal experiences:<br />·        ideals and motives that played a role in growing through life;<br />·        the people we have loved in our lives;<br />·        sense of direction carrying us through;<br />·        commitments made and kept;<br />·        choices making us who we are now.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"> Action</span><br />Members signed up to join the Funeral March at the Civil Rights Museum on April 9 to defund current U.S. wars and to host the Pax Christi table, making our presence public.             During the march, members carried the Pax Christi banner in the procession to the Mississippi River.  <br />           <br />Pax Christi Memphis is supporting CMIRA (Christian Memphians for Immigration Reform) by co-sponsoring the movie “Welcome To Shelbyville” in its showings on May 17th at Studio On The Square. The film explores the experience of a town in Tennessee with a population of whites, African Americans, Latinos, and Somalis. Movie times are 5:00 and 7:00 pm. Panel discussions will follow. Members of the panel include immigrants, a resettlement coordinator, and representatives of local agencies.<br /> <br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">May Meeting</span><br />On May 3 we will meet at 7:00 pm. This will be our last gathering at Church of the Holy Spirit, our gracious hosts for the last several years. In gratitude, members will bring an offering of canned goods and staple foods for the Holy Spirit food pantry. Foods requested are: canned meat, canned fruit, canned vegetables, canned soup, peanut butter, white rice, instant mashed potatoes, cereal, jelly, spaghetti sauce, spaghetti pasta, ramen noodles, macaroni &amp; cheese.<br />During the meeting, Jacob Flowers will address the membership on the Mayors’ Plan For Homelessness.<br />        <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Future Meetings</span><br />Beginning June 14, Pax Christi Memphis will meet the second Tuesday of every month at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception at 6:45 pm in Marian Hall. The facility is handicap accessible. Entrance is on the west side of the church building. There will be ample lighted parking and security.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Planning</span><br />The planning team for Pax Christi Memphis includes Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<br />To suggest agenda items for an upcoming meeting, please phone Janice Vanderhaar at 901-362-9364.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Jubilee</span><br />Long-time member of Pax Christi Memphis, Father John Atkinson, will celebrate 50 years of ministry on May 13, 2011. There will be a Liturgy at 7 pm at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. We offer our prayers and congratulations to Father John.  You may send a message to him at Villa Vianney, 10611 Bishop Dozier Drive, Cordova, TN 38016.<p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /> </p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 3, 2011<br /></span></p><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">March Meeting</span></b></span> – Attendance: 13 members.<br /><div style="text-align: left;">The meeting opened with members stating what each appreciated most about the meeting in February.<br />The Treasurer Jerry Bettice presented a brief report on our chapter’s finances and gave an overview of some considerations for a budget for the coming year.<br />A number of proposals were discussed and led to group decisions:<br />·  The chapter agreed to sign on to the “Step Back From the Brink” statement by Pax Christi USA urging action by President Obama to follow up on the New START treaty and work with the Russian Republic to take nuclear weapons off alert. The ad will run in the National Catholic Reporter on April 29th. More information is found at http://paxchristiusa.org/programs/.<br />·  Pax Christi Memphis members are encouraged to participate in the April 9th anti-war rally organized by the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center. Call  901-725-4990 for details.<br />·  Pax Christi Memphis will support CMIRA (Christian Memphians for Immigration Reform) in promoting the movie “Welcome To Shelbyville” in its showing on May 1st at Studio On The Square. The film explores the experience of a town in Tennessee with a population made more diverse by the presence of immigrants.<br />         During the meeting members signed a letter to Governor Quinn of Illinois to thank him for signing into law the elimination of the death penalty in his state.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">April Meeting</span> – On April 5 we will meet at Church of the Holy Spirit at 7:00 pm. Sr. Nic Catrambone will make a presentation entitled “The Blessing of Aging.” Sr. Joan Chittister’s book The Gift of Years: Growing Older Gracefully provides background for the discussion of this meeting.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Treasurer’s Report</span><br />         A recent donation of $300 has boosted our bank balance to $777.37. The donor has asked that some of the money be allocated to pay for dues to Pax Christi USA for members who could not otherwise afford to pay for this membership.<br />           <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Planning</span><br />            The current planning team for Pax Christi Memphis includes Judy Bettice, Linda Raiteri, Altonette Stone and Janice Vanderhaar.<br />            To suggest agenda items for an upcoming meeting, please phone Janice Vanderhaar at 901-362-9364.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Recommended Films</span><br />·     “Atomic Mom” shown once at the Ridgeway Four at 5 pm on April 8.<br />·     “Grace Card” – check local listings.<br /> <br />Focus for 2011: Prayer, Study and Action.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">OREPA</span><br />The Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance is spearheading a campaign to prevent the building of a new bomb plant at the Y-12 location in Oak Ridge. You can take action at<br />From the booklet “Reflections for Nonviolent Community” found on the OREPA website: http://orepa.org<br /><span style="font-style: italic;">Justice is offended by the double standard by which some nations presume nuclear weapons for themselves while seeking by every moral, legal and technical means to deny them to others.</span><br />~ United Methodist Council of Bishops (1986)<br /><br /><br />Sister Thea Bowman is the first African-American woman to receive a Doctorate in Theology from Boston College.<br /><br /><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Georgia,serif; font-weight: bold;">In Loving Memory: Sr. Thea Bowman</span><br style="font-family: Georgia,serif; font-weight: bold;" /><span style="font-family: Georgia,serif; font-weight: bold;">1937-1990</span><br /></div>Sr. Thea Bowman, F.S.P.A., Ph.D., was born in the small rural town of Canton in Central Mississippi. Her grandfather was a slave; her father was a physician and her mother, a teacher. In 1965, Sr. Bowman received a B.A. in English, Speech and Drama from Viterbo College in La Crosse, Wisconsin. In 1969, she received an M.A. in English and in 1972, a Ph.D. in English Language, Literature, and Linguistics; both degrees from The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.<br /><br />She has been a teacher in Blessed Sacrament School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, Holy Child Jesus High School in Canton, Mississippi, The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., Viterbo College in La Crosse, Wisconsin and the Institute of Black Catholic Studies at Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana.<br /><br />In her position as Consultant for Intercultural Awareness for the Diocese of Jackson, Mississippi, Sister Thea frequently works with children to help them grow in awareness of their gifts and of their cultural heritage. Through song, dance, poetry, drama and story, she communicates joy, freedom and pride, using traditional Black teaching techniques that are holistic, participatory and reality focused.<br /><br />Sister Thea makes more than 100 public appearances each year, giving lectures, recitals, short courses, workshops, and conference presentations, spreading the message that people are gifted, that Black is beautiful, and that cross-cultural collaboration enriches both education and living.<br /><br />In Nigeria, Kenya, Canada, the Virgin Islands, Hawaii, New York to Florida, Mississippi to California, Louisiana to Illinois, thousands of people have worked with Sister Thea. She makes doers of watchers, makes people more aware of their own gifts and potentials, and puts races in touch with one another. Her ministry is a ministry of joy.<br /><br />Sister Thea deservingly received her Doctor of Religion from Boston College in 1989. The following is a citation of a speech conferring her distinctions at the 1989 Boston College Commencement Ceremony.<br /><br />Franciscan Sister of Perpetual Adoration; charismatic evangelist calling Black Catholics to their rightful place and to the expression of their culture within the church, advocate and consultant for intercultural awareness for the Diocese of Jackson; scholar of English Language and literature expert in the Renaissance and the works of William Faulkner; master teacher whose methodology, rich in Black Community's traditional ways of learning and doing, profoundly touches rural Mississippi school children, university students, and world-wide lecture or concert audiences alike. In the glory of your ministry we witness the Franciscan ideal of joy rendered more radiant by a woman of lively, living faith, truly Black and authentically Catholic. To your lifetime of building the Kingdom of God, preaching the Good News in the language of your people, and reclaiming the virtues and values that are your inheritance, Boston College says an approving &quot;Amen!&quot; and proudly declares you Doctor of Religion.<br /><br /> <br /> <br />Judy Bettice<br /><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br /></span></b></span></p></div><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /> </p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 1, 2011<br /></span></p><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">February Meeting</span></b></span> 14 members of our Pax Christi Memphis chapter met on February 19 and discussed our program for the rest of this year.<br />There will be a new planning team; Janice Vanderhaar, Judy Bettice and Linda Raiteri will take on this responsibility.<br />Each member present was invited to propose one idea for our chapter and its future.<br />Meetings for March, April and August have definite plans, and other ideas remain on the list of possibilities.<br />On March 19 (1:00 pm), the topic will be homelessness in Memphis and Shelby County. Linda Rateri is in the process of inviting Brad Watkins from the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center to present an account of the work the Center is doing in regard to this issue.<br />On March 1, members of Pax Christi Memphis will attend the meeting of the Memphis City Council in support of the Mayors’ Plan to End Homelessness in Memphis and Shelby County. The meeting will be in Council chambers at 3:30 pm.<br />Our meeting on April 5 (7:00 pm) will include a presentation, “The Blessing of Aging,” by Sr. Nic Catrambone. Sr. Joan Chittister’s book The Gift of Years: Growing Older Gracefully provides background for the discussion of this meeting.<br />For our August meeting we will be joining the monthly potluck of the diocesan Ministry with Gays and Lesbians. This group has invited Judy and Jerry Bettice to speak to them about Pax Christi. Details about this potluck will be provided closer to the time of the event.<br />Other ideas that surfaced in our February meeting were as follows:<br />·     the priority of prayer, study and action in our Pax Christi mission;<br />·     publicity with the possibility of new branding to be more inviting to those potentially interested in our chapter and its activities;<br />·     actively seeking new members, particularly in Catholic parishes and among the younger generation;<br />·     connecting with other peace groups in Memphis;<br />·     screening of important documentaries, possibly aside from our regular meeting time and place;<br />·     alternative economics;<br />·     environmental issues (Rita Harris mentioned as a resource);<br />·     greater openness that is apolitical;<br />·     non-violence in the use of language;<br />·     diocesan commission on peace and justice;<br />·     the importance of cosponsoring events with the Pax Christi Memphis name publicized;<br />·     change of venue (Fr. Al Kirk to investigate the possibility of meeting in the facilities of the Cathedral).<br /> <br />Phyllis Tickle, author of The Great Emergence, will be speaking on March 25 and 26 at the NAVIGATE church leadership conference to be held at St. Luke United Methodist Church.<br />More information can be found at the web page <a href="http://www.stlukesumc.org/news/">www.stlukesumc.org/news/</a><br />Pax Christi member Elton Watlington recommends <span style="font-style: italic;">The Great Emergence</span>.<p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /></p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 10 December 2010/January 2011<br /></span></p><p style="text-align: center; color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-family: 'Times New Roman',serif; font-style: italic;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Each fresh look at the Christmas mystery reminds  us that all Christian living is paschal mystery living; that is dying (darkness) precedes the rising (the Light).<br />(Living Liturgy 2011)</span></p><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br />December Meeting</span></b></span><div style="text-align: left;">Attendance was very scant, six in all. The group viewed a video of Sr. Joan Chittister speaking on the prophets at the 2010 Conference of Call To Action in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Discussion followed the video.<br /><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">January Meeting</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br /> Attendance was very scant, six in all. The group viewed a video of Sr. Joan Chittister speaking on the prophets at the 2010 Conference of Call To Action in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Discussion followed the video.<br /> Attendance being very limited as a consequence, at our last meeting those present decided to schedule our next meeting for the afternoon on Saturday, January 15th, in daylight hours from 1 - 3 pm at Church of the Holy Spirit. Fr. Kirk has graciously agreed to act as the Security person for the 15 of January, This is a trial, and IF attendance is markedly better, we will continue to meet on the third Saturdays of February and March. If folks arrive a little early, the building should still be open from the morning. Fr. Kirk will make sure all is kosher until 3 p.m.<br />             Our meeting will include a renewal of the vow of non-violence.</span></span></p><br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Current Issue<br /></span>The issue of increasing our membership arises now and then. Perhaps, the question is centered on what we have to pass on to the next generation. We see young people active in working for social justice, often outside the orbit of Catholic or religious influence. How do we articulate our spirituality of nonviolence for those coming after us? How do we engage those same persons with us here and now in the mission we have received from Pax Christi? Who do we know of the younger generation? Let us pray over the matter and reflect on the values that will enrich the service that we already see taking place in our church and civil communities. Let us take action to reach out. This might bring us into new ways of communicating in 2011.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">From Bishop Gabino Zavala, Our Episcopal President</span><br />Nonviolence is a concept that goes deeper than the avoidance of the use of military force. Gospel nonviolence is about right relationship.<br />(Address on March 11, 2009 at the University of Great Falls, in Montana)  <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br /></span></b></span></p></div><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /></p> <p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />December 2010</span></p><p style="text-align: center; color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-family: 'Times New Roman',serif; font-style: italic;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Due to our regular meeting times being in the dark of winter and the attendance being very limited as a consequence, at our last meeting those present decided to schedule our next meeting for the afternoon on Saturday, January 15th, in daylight hours from 1 - 3 pm at Church of the Holy Spirit. Fr. Kirk has graciously agreed to act as the Security person for the 15 of January, This is a trial, and IF attendance is markedly better, we will continue to meet on the third Saturdays of February and March. If folks arrive a little early, the building should still be open from the morning. Fr. Kirk will make sure all is kosher until 3 p.m.</span></p><p style="text-align: center; color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-family: 'Times New Roman',serif; font-style: italic;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;"><span style="font-family: Arial,sans-serif; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Our January meeting will include the renewal of the Vow Of Nonviolence.<br />Please bring your annual dues if you have not already made that contribution.</span><br /></span></p><p style="text-align: center;"><span style="color: rgb(201, 205, 255); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;"><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman',serif; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-style: italic; font-weight: bold;">An Advent Reflection</span><br /></span></span></p><p style="text-align: left;"><span style="color: rgb(201, 205, 255); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;"><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman',serif; background-color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Advent</span><br /><span style="font-size: 10px;">By Daniel Berrigan</span><br /><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-size: 12px ! important;">It is not true that creation and the human family are doomed to<br />destruction and loss --<br />This is true: For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten<br />Son,<br />that whoever believes in him, shall not perish, but have everlasting life.<br />It is not true that we must accept inhumanity and discrimination,<br />hunger and poverty, death and destruction --<br />This is true: I have come that they may have life, and that abundantly.<br />It is not true that violence and hatred should have the last word,<br />and that war and destruction rule forever --<br />This is true: For unto us a child is born, and unto us a Son is given,<br />and the government shall be upon his shoulder,<br />And his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,<br />the Everlasting, the Prince of Peace.<br />It is not true that we are simply victims of the powers of evil who seek to<br />rule the world --<br />This is true: To me is given authority in heaven and on earth,<br />and lo, I am with you, even unto the end of the world.<br />It is not true that we have to wait for those who are specially gifted,<br />who are the prophets of the Church, before we can be peacemakers.<br />This is true: I will pour out my Spirit on all flesh,<br />and your sons and daughters shall prophesy,<br />your young shall see visions,<br />and your old shall have dreams.<br />It is not true that our hopes for the liberation of humanity, for justice,<br />human dignity, and peace are not meant for this earth and for this history --<br />This is true: The hour comes, and it is now, that true worshippers<br />shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth.<br />So let us enter Advent in hope, even hope against hope.<br />Let us see visions of love and peace and justice.<br />Let us affirm with humility, with joy, with faith, with courage:<br />Jesus Christ -- the Life of the world.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br /><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px ! important;"> <br />Source: Testimony: The Word Made Fresh, by Daniel Berrigan. Maryknoll, NY:<br />Orbis Books, 2004.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br /></span></span></p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 9, December 2010</span></p><p style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><span style="font-style: italic;">I give you a new commandment: Love one another. And you’re to love one another the way I have loved you. This is how all will know that you’re my disciples: that you truly love one another.<br /></span></p><div style="text-align: right; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><span style="font-style: italic;">John 13:34,35</span><span style="font-style: italic;">  </span></div> <div style="text-align: left;"><style>@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Arial&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Wingdings&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Verdana&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Calibri&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }ol { margin-bottom: 0in; }ul { margin-bottom: 0in; }</style> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">November Meeting<br /></span></b></span></p>Altonette Stone reported on some developing ideas from Pax Christi USA in its vision of  the future. Three areas were emphasized: culture; structure; and theology. Colleges and other places where the concerns of younger people emerge are important focal points for looking to the future of Pax Christi USA.<br />Our discussion in this gathering of the local chapter brought out the need for new energy and fresh ideas. We posed the question, “Why are younger people not joining us?” One answer cited the interest of younger people engaged in peace work centered on action and specific projects. It was also pointed out that Pax Christi is a movement, and we become active by participating in the activities of other groups like the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center. Our orientation is always that of nonviolence, and we bring that to local initiatives for peace and justice.<br />A portion of the meeting was devoted to the impressions of Pax Christi Memphis<br />members who had attended the Gandhi/King Conference. Sessions that were attended included:<br />·     Tim Wise on racism at the conference dinner;<br />·     the plenary talk by Jaribu Hill about her struggles for civil rights;<br />·     John Carmody and the neurobiology of violence and nonviolence;<br />·     Billy Kyles speaking on moving ahead in our society;<br />·     The Community Relations Service of the U.S. Department of Justice and its work of resolving civil conflicts and tensions;<br />·     Debra Brittenum and Onie Johns on racial reconciliation;<br />·     and the session on vegetarianism and respect for creation.<br />A question was posed about a possible visit and presentation by Tom Cordaro. Some time in the spring of 2011 might be feasible. No other details are available at this time.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Current Issue<br /></span> From Network Lobby, a National Catholic Social Justice Lobby: The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty is an important step toward making the world a safer place. Nuclear weapons are a threat to human dignity and all of creation and as a world leader, the United States has a responsibility to help reduce and eliminate them.<br />Call your representatives in Congress to ask their vote for the START treaty ratification. <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">December Meeting</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br />We will meet on December 7 from 7 – 9 pm at Church of the Holy Spirit. Possible items for the agenda would be the video presentation of a talk by Joan Chittister at the 2010 Call To Action Conference or an Advent prayer service for peace.<br /></span> </span></p>Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br /><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Contact: 327-8068 or visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org</span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><br /></p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">ADVENT PRAYER: Enkindle our Hope</span>By: Sr. Katherine Feely, SND<br />This Advent prayer reflects the deep longings of our hearts and of our world for the light that can dispel the darkness and lead us to peace.<br /><br />Emmanuel,<br />Our world waits in darkness longing for Your light.<br /><br />In the midst of darkness, enkindle our hope.<br /><br />As we long for lasting peace in the midst of war, Be with us.<br />As we long for families to be reunited, Be with us.<br />As we long for enemies to be reconciled, Be with us.<br />As we long for cures and healings, Be with us.<br />As we long for decent jobs and economic security, Be with us.<br />As we long for love and community, Be with us.<br />Fulfill the deepest longings of your people and<br />Dispel the darkness in our hearts and in our world.<br />Let your Word ignite the hope the world needs to bring to life your love and justice.<br />Amen.</span></span></p></div><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 7, August/September 2010</span></p><p><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">I give you a new commandment: Love one another. And you’re to love one another the way I have loved you. This is how all will know that you’re my disciples: that you truly love one another.<br /></span></p><div style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">John 13:34,35</span><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">  </span></div> <div style="text-align: left;"><style>@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Arial&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Wingdings&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Verdana&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Calibri&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }ol { margin-bottom: 0in; }ul { margin-bottom: 0in; }</style> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">September Meeting<br /></span></b></span></p>The assembled members viewed “One Border One Body,” a documentation of the annual joint celebration of Eucharist on both sides of the fence along the border between Mexico and the United States. Discussion followed and referred to the need for practical solutions to the challenges presented by people coming to the United States from other nations. Two suggestions immerged: get informed about Catholic social teaching and contact legislators in regard to recommendations consistent with that teaching.<br />Two documents are included with this mailing: 1) proposals from NETWORK, a National Catholic Social Justice Lobby and 2) five principles regarding immigration from the bishops of the United States and Mexico.<br />The community approved signing Healthy Memphis Common Table’s “The Let’s Change Initiative Pledge.” Our pledge is to provide healthy foods and snacks along with meaningful physical activity; it also includes support for policy and environmental changes aimed at healthy choices in nutrition and physical activity.<br />A copy of the pledge is included with this mailing of News and Notes.<br />Also approved at this meeting was the contribution of $100.00 from our treasury to the Gandhi-King Conference. This was part of the check for $320.00 that was sent to the Conference organizers. The additional $220.00 came from members of Pax Christi Memphis who had earmarked donations to be included in the support from our Pax Christi Memphis community.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">A Tribute to Manuel Viera<br /></span> <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">From George Grider:</span><br />Manuel was a friend to many, including myself. He and I once rode together in his car to the annual SOA watch in Columbus, Georgia. We shared a low cost motel room. This visit sparked an interested discussion of how the poor fare in the world. Namely, do the poor possess better manners and love for their fellow man than the rich? I argued that the torn up room next door showed they do not. He argued from his experience in the third world countries, that they do. That a poor man might give you the shirt off his back, while a rich man wouldn’t give you a dime.<br />My last visit with Manuel was a few years ago in a hospital room. He’d been admitted for some heart defect, one that had been operated on decades earlier. He was breathing into some kind of machine that exercised his heart and lungs. It was a noisy contraption, and when I stepped into the room he was obliged to keep going on it so I had to wait until he finished to say hello.<br />A nurse was standing nearby. I asked about the machine. How did it work, I wanted to know. “Ask him!” she said. Manuel was a student of the world, including any kind of medical technology. Upon completion of his routine, he greeted me warmly and began to explain everything about the equipment that was keeping him alive. As if he were a kid telling about a new toy.<br />We’ll much miss this warmhearted man who showed us all how to live.<br />(More on Manuel Soto Viera can be found at mesv.manolophoto.com) <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">October Meeting</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br />We will meet on October 5 from 7 – 9 pm at Church of the Holy Spirit.<br /><br /></span> </span></p>Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br /><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Contact: 327-8068 or visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><br /></p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">NETWORK</span><br />NETWORK, a National Catholic Social Justice Lobby, believes that comprehensive immigration reform is badly needed and will benefit our nation in many ways.<br />In response to the clear requirements of our faith, NETWORK is advocating for:<br /></span></span></p><ul><li><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Realistic path to earned legalization for people in the U.S. without status</span></span></li><li><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Effective program for new permanent resident petitioners</span></span></li><li><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Plan for addressing applicant backlogs for permanent residence, with family unity as a priority</span></span></li><li><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Effective program for temporary workers</span></span></li><li><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Restoration of due process protections and reformed detention policies for those detained in the immigration system</span></span></li><li><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">More emphasis on fixing “pushes” for immigration that result from U.S. trade policies and global economic conditions; capacity to track immigration patterns in the U.S.</span></span></li></ul><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Five principles regarding immigration from A Pastoral Letter Concerning Migration </span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">from the Catholic Bishops of Mexico and the United States</span><br /><ol><li><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Persons have the right to find opportunities in their homeland.</span> All persons have the right to find in their own countries the economic, political, and social opportunities to live in dignity and achieve a full life through the use of their God-given gifts. In this context, work that provides a just, living wage is a basic human need.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Persons have the right to migrate to support themselves and their families</span>.</span> The Church recognizes that all the goods of the earth belong to all people.15 When persons cannot find employment in their country of origin to support themselves and their families, they have a right to find work elsewhere in order to survive. Sovereign nations should provide ways to accommodate this right.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Sovereign nations have the right to control their borders.</span> The Church recognizes the right of sovereign nations to control their territories but rejects such control when it is exerted merely for the purpose of acquiring additional wealth. More powerful economic nations, which have the ability to protect and feed their residents, have a stronger obligation to accommodate migration flows.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Refugees and asylum seekers should be afforded protection</span>. Those who flee wars and persecution should be protected by the global community. This requires, at a minimum, that migrants have a right to claim refugee status without incarceration and to have their claims fully considered by a competent authority.</li><li><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">The human dignity and human rights of undocumented migrants should be respected.</span> Regardless of their legal status, migrants, like all persons, possess inherent human dignity that should be respected. Often they are subject to punitive laws and harsh treatment from enforcement officers from both receiving and transit countries. Government policies that respect the basic human rights of the undocumented are necessary.</li></ol></div><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /> </p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 7, August/September 2010</span></p><p><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">In the drama of the Family of</span><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"> Nazareth we perceive the sorrowful</span><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"> plight of so many migrants . . .</span><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"> [T]he human person must always</span><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"> be the focal point in the vast field</span><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"> of international migration.</span><br style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);" /></p><div style="text-align: right;"><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><span style="font-size: 10px ! important;">Pope Benedict XVI</span></span><br style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);" /><span style="font-style: italic; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">World Day of Migrants and Refugees 2007  </span></div> <div style="text-align: left;"><style>@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Arial&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Wingdings&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Verdana&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }@font-face { font-family: &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Calibri&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; line-height: 115%; font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }ol { margin-bottom: 0in; }ul { margin-bottom: 0in; }</style> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">August Meeting<br /></span></b></span></p>Janice Vanderhaar introduced Sister Sue of the Sisters of Providence at St. Mary’s of the Woods in Indiana. Sister Sue spoke briefly on the efforts of her community for “creation and peace.” A special ministry is the White Violet Center for Eco-Justice. More can be found at<br /><a href="http://www.spsmw.org/EcoJustice/Home/tabid/526/Default.aspx">http://www.spsmw.org/EcoJustice/Home/tabid/526/Default.aspx</a><br />Janice and Ed Wallin then presented their impressions from the Pax Christi National Conference: Know Justice; Know Peace. One special event of the conference was the presentation of the Eileen Egan Award to the National Leadership Conference of Religious Women. Bishop Gabino Zavala, the bishop president of Pax Christi USA spoke of this award as recognition of the vital leadership of religious women in the United States.  Other events included a session about Blackwater, the military contractors group and the book Blackwater by Jeremy Scahill. Social ministries for the poor were discussed by Elena Segura the new director of Archdiocesan Immigration Affairs in Chicago.<br />The JustFaith study was mentioned and is on the horizon in the Diocese of Memphis. The question arose: how is Pax Christi Memphis to participate in this concept when it is activated in the local church?<br />The last part of the meeting was devoted to remembering the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki with a short slide presentation accompanied by prayer and reflection on the 65th anniversary of this tragedy.<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">September Meeting<br /></span> A 30-minute film called “One Border One Body” will be shown. The content is a documentation of an annual joint celebration of Eucharist on both sides of the fence along the border between Mexico and the United States. Bring your questions and your concerns along with insights you may have about immigration--especially along our southern borders.<br />If anyone would like to bring some light refreshments to the meeting, especially fruit or nutritious snacks, they will be greatly appreciated. <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">For Our Reflection Before the Film</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Mark 12: 29-31</span><br />Jesus replied, “The first is this: ‘Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is Lord alone! You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.’ The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”<br /><span style="font-weight: bold;">Exodus 23: 9</span><br />You shall not oppress an alien; you well know how it feels to be an alien, since you were once aliens yourselves in the land of Egypt.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">Prayer Requests:</span> Please remember Altonette Stone who has been ill for about three weeks. She is about to undergo tests. No other details are available at this time. Fr. John Atkinson has been in the rehabilitation unit of Ave Maria Home. It is possible that he will move out of that program soon.<br /> <br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Tennessee Health Care Campaign (THCC)</span><br />Pax Christi Memphis has been contacted by this organization. Is there any interest in our membership for an update on what THCC is doing in response to recent health care legislation? Let us know what you think.</span></span></p></div><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 6, July/August 2010</span>  </p><div style="text-align: left;"><link href="file://localhost/Users/paul/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/msoclip1/01/clip_filelist.xml" rel="File-List" /> <style> &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Times New Roman&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; 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margin-top:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri;} table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-parent:&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Times New Roman&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:101843339; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:-567791036 66569 197641 328713 66569 197641 328713 66569 197641 328713;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:none; mso-level-number-position:left; margin-left:.75in; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} --&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; </style> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">No Happy Anniversary for Minimum Wage Workers July 24 ...<br /></span></b></span></p>July 24 is the anniversary of last year’s raise in the federal minimum wage and no new increases are scheduled. The minimum wage is so low today at $7.25 an hour, says the Let Justice Roll Living Wage Campaign, that it’s lower than the minimum wage of 1956, which was $8.02 adjusted for inflation. 1956 is 54 years ago.<br />The minimum wage sets the wage floor, affecting workers up the ladder. Today, four out of six occupations employing the largest number of workers nationwide -- including retail salespersons, cashiers and food preparation and serving workers -- have a median wage that is lower than the minimum wage of 1968, adjusted for inflation (half make less than the median, half make more). It would take $10 to match the buying power of the minimum wage at its peak in 1968.<br />&quot;The minimum wage was enacted during the Great Depression to put a floor under workers' wages and increase buying power to boost business and economic recovery,&quot; said Let Justice Roll Director Holly Sklar, author of Raise the Floor: Wages and Policies That Work for All of Us. “The fall in worker buying power is a big reason we're in the worst economic crisis since the Depression and a big reason we’re having so much trouble getting out of it.”<br />More is found at <a href="http://letjusticeroll.org/">http://letjusticeroll.org<br /></a><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">SOA Watch <br /><img width="160" height="240" border="0" src="/xml/wfxdirect/res;jsessionid=4D3E87F36B9237EAFF8F2AC8041D24FC.TCpfixus71a?name=Roy+Bourgeois.jpg&type=image" wfxtype="resource" wfxsrc="Roy Bourgeois.jpg" style="width: 97px; height: 146px;" /><br /></span> School of the Americas Watch was recently informed that Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, which has previous contributed $17,000 annually to SOA Watch, will not support (their) efforts for peace and justice in the Americas this year. Their decision is due to SOA Watch founder Father Roy Bourgeois' personal belief that women, as well as men, should be able to be ordained into the priesthood. <a href="http://soaw.org/component/content/article/96-mission-and-history/3466-17-for-17000">http://soaw.org/component/content/article/96-mission-and-history/3466-17-for-17000</a> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">July Meeting</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: black;"> </span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Eleven members gathered in prayer and study related to the Gulf of Mexico oil well crisis.<br />The community approved the expenditure of $100.00 for an ad in the program booklet for the Labor Day Picnic of the Workers Interfaith Network. We will be listed as a sponsor. Two adult tickets to the picnic will be available for whoever would like to use them. Contact Jerry Bettice if you are interested or if you would like to purchase tickets or a personal sponsorship of the picnic.<br />A portion of the meeting was devoted to brainstorming about how to expand our membership.</span> </span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px ! important;">August Meeting</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(118, 146, 60);"><b> <br /></b></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Janice Vanderhaar and Ed Wallin will present a review of their experience at the recent national meeting of Pax Christi USA.<br />There will also be a commemoration of the Hiroshima anniversary during the meeting.</span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br /></span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px ! important;">JustFaith Ministries</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 11px ! important;"><br />Just Faith: Recently Pax Christi USA has partnered with JustFaith Ministries, an exploration of social ministries in Catholic communities. More can be found at <a href="http://www.justfaith.org/">www.justfaith.org</a>.</span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"> JustFaith will be coming to the Diocese of Memphis in the near future.<br /> <span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic;">“Reliance on nuclear weapons for [deterrence] is becoming increasingly hazardous and decreasingly effective . . .&quot;</span> (Former Secretaries of State Schultz, Kissinger and others in “A World Free of Nuclear Weapons,” in the <span style="font-style: italic;">Wall Street Journal</span>)<br /> Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 or visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org</span></span></p></div><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 5, June/July 2010</span>  </p> <div style="text-align: left;"><link href="file://localhost/Users/paul/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/msoclip1/01/clip_filelist.xml" rel="File-List" /> <style> &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;Times New Roman&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;; 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line-height: normal; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">May Meeting</span></b></span></p>Grow Memphis coordinator Josephine Williams presented an overview of organic gardening projects sponsored by or supported by the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center. There are now 15-18 gardens in production in Memphis. Josephine spoke of the impact that community gardens have on neighborhoods and on school lunches, the type of vegetables available in local farmers’ markets and in restaurants in the city. Gardening is a subversive activity that is non-threatening but can have an effect on the quality of nutrition in a community.<br />Lessons from the garden according to our speaker include: 1) we learn delayed gratification; everything growing has its own season; 2) delaying the work makes more work with less satisfying results; the weeds wait for no one; and 3) persistence has its rewards as well; tasks need to be done to completion; weeding can be quiet meditation time.<br />Josephine stressed respect for living creatures as she spoke of her bees and her chickens. She also discussed briefly the Green Fork Certification earned by local restaurants. This program gives recognition to waste reduction, to the use of biodegradable materials and to the contribution of composted waste to community gardens.<br />To promote our ongoing interest and involvement in responsible food production and nutrition, Josephine recommended the following:<br />·     In Defense of Food and Food Rules, both by Michael Pollan<br />·     Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">June Meeting</span> <br />Pax Christi member Altonette Stone gave an account of her recent pilgrimage to Israel. She included her reflections on the plight of Palestinians and spoke of their state as one of “apartheid” with parallels to the formerly segregated South in the United States. She expressed disappointment in her “Israeli experience” while speaking with enthusiasm about visiting biblical sites, especially those that we know from the gospels.<br />In her visit to the Holy Land Altonette was well aware of the religious diversity and differences that arise at various sacred places. In one instance, she related, disputes between Christian groups over a site have been resolved by entrusting the keys to Muslim hands for security. Some of the diversity she found in encountering pilgrims from all over the world.<br />The impression from Altonette’s varied experiences of present day Israel is that of a blend of contrasts, conflict, and great reverence for history rooted in the land of our religious heritage. <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px;">July Meeting</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: black;"> </span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">Socializing starts at 7 pm and the meeting proper will begin with prayer at 7:15 pm at Church of the Holy Spirit.</span> </span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis supports the MSPJC</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(118, 146, 60);"><b> </b></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;">The Mid-South Peace and Justice Center has expressed its gratitude to Pax Christi Memphis for our sponsorship of Bands Not Bombs. Publicity for the event featured our name and gave us some exposure to the local community.</span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><br /></span></span></p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);"><b><span style="font-size: 11px ! important;">Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers</span></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 11px ! important;"><br />What do the grandmothers know that we don’t know?  There will be a Virtual Council of 13 of them with prayer, blessings, guidance and insight, with whatever Spirit moves them to share. It will be on Saturday, June 19th. More information is found on </span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: white;"><span style="font-size: 11px;"><a href="http://www.theshiftcouncil.com/">www.theshiftcouncil.com</a><br /></span> </span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 11px ! important;"><br /></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);"><i>&quot;...we need to talk of peace now. Not because peace will be achieved immediately or easily, but because we need to have our minds set on a goal, something positive, a just and logical conclusion that lifts us out of the engulfing senselesness of war.&quot; (Oscar Arias)</i></span></p></div><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 4, April/May 2010</span>  </p><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0.5in; line-height: normal;"><br /><span style="font-style: italic;">“Planting a garden in the community is an act of love and act of trust. It takes faith to put the very personal act of growing what we eat out into the public space and inviting others to join.  It is in this way that urban and community gardening has tremendous power.”</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">(Josephine Williams of GrowMemphis)</span><br /> <br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">April Meeting</span></span><br />Attendees at the April 6th Pax Christi Memphis meeting viewed the documentary Nuclear Rescue 911: Broken Arrows &amp; Incidents. The U.S. government uses the phrase &quot;broken arrow&quot; to refer to an accident involving a nuclear weapon; as the movie made chillingly clear, there have been many more such mishaps than the public realizes. Between 1950 and 1980, there were 32 accidents that involved a nuke, dire situations that featured crashing bombers, disappearing submarines, and even a deadly fiasco near us in Arkansas triggered when a hapless technician dropped a socket wrench down a missile silo. While some of these events were calamitous, none of them, thankfully, actually set off a nuclear explosion. The film, however, illustrated that some of these misfortunes came astonishingly close to wiping out millions of people. Using a combination of news footage and stock archival footage to portray real events, credibility came from interviews with participants in the various accidents. A former Department of Energy spokesman appeared throughout to provide details about particular events. Much of the material was declassified shortly before the documentary was produced.<br />Following a brief discussion of the film, members added their signatures to a letter addressed to President Obama urging him to move forward with fundamental changes to the posture of the U.S. nuclear arsenal. The letter, drafted and signed by Pax Christi USA leadership, praised the President for the speech he delivered last year in Prague, and encouraged him to &quot;... move our nation beyond indefinite deterrence and embrace elimination as the fundamental posture of U.S. nuclear weapons policy.&quot; It further pointed out that, &quot;... when the Holy See expressed its limited acceptance of nuclear deterrence during the Cold War, it was with the clearly stated condition that deterrence was only a step on the way towards progressive nuclear disarmament.&quot;<br />In keeping with our &quot;No Nukes&quot; theme of the evening, members attending were asked to write postcards addressed to organizers of the Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance for an event held the weekend of April 10th. We offered words of encouragement to our east Tennessee sisters and brothers preparing to embark upon their April Action for a Nuclear Weapons Free World, and mailed the cards the following day.<br />A request from the Mid-South Peace &amp; Justice Center was relayed to Pax Christi Memphis for sponsorship of the annual Bands Not Bombs event, an all-day outdoor festival held in the Cooper-Young neighborhood. Proceeds from the event, planned for Saturday, June 5th, go to benefit the work of MSPJC. Members expressed a desire to participate at the &quot;Friend&quot; level, with a contribution of $100, and voted with a show of hands to do so. An appeal was made for someone willing to work a Pax Christi Memphis table at the event. MSPJC asks that a portion of any goods sold at the event be contributed back to the center.<br />Altonette Stone, a member of the Pax Christi Memphis planning committee, outlined travel plans for PCART participation (Pax Christi Anti Racism Training). She will also journey to the Holy Land soon and will present a program later this summer based on her travel. Monsignor Al Kirk led members who lifted hands to extend blessings upon Altonette and offered prayers for safe journeys.<br />Our thanks to Altonette for providing opening and closing prayers, and to all of those who furnished soft drinks, popcorn, cookies and chocolate.<br /> <br /><span style="font-size: 12px; color: rgb(0, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">May Meeting</span><br /> “Planting the Seeds of Justice: How urban and community growers are taking back our food system” will be the topic addressed by our guest speaker Josephine Williams.<br />Williams currently coordinates the Mid-South Peace and Justice Center's GrowMemphis, an urban and community gardening initiative.<br />Socializing starts at 7 pm and the talk will begin at 7:15 at Church of the Holy Spirit. (The church maintains its own community vegetable garden.)<br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(0, 255, 0);">Some Catholic Trivia</span><br /> The Roman Catholic Church has deemed August 30 as the feast day of Saint Fiacre. He has been recognized in Europe as the patron saint of gardeners since the Middle Ages. His day is celebrated with special masses, floral processions and pilgrimages. In France, special floats of elaborate floral arrangements make their way down flower petal-covered streets. (www.county.milwaukee.gov/StFiacre10506.htm)<br />  <br /> Paul Crum was the principle contributor to this month’s newsletter. Thank you, Paul.</span></p><p /><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes<br />Number 3, March 2010</span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b> </b></span> </p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; text-align: justify; text-indent: 0.5in; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"><i>“It is absolutely clear to us that the present US policy does not include a decisive commitment to progressive nuclear disarmament. Rather, nuclear weapons policy has been expanded in the post-Cold War period to include new missions well beyond their previous role as a deterrent to nuclear attack.” (</i><i>The Morality of Nuclear Deterrence: </i></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(84, 141, 212);"><i><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">An Evaluation by Pax Christi Bishops in the United States)</span></i></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(118, 146, 60);"><b><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);"><br />March Meeting</span></b></span><br />Those attending the March 2nd meeting enjoyed a video of Sister Joan Chittister's plenary address to the Call to Action group on the occasion of their thirtieth anniversary in 2006. Sr. Joan outlined CTA's accomplishments during the past three decades, but challenged her audience to address important issues that linger for the Church and society at large. She pointed out that, &quot;... it is not God's fault&quot; for most of the problems we face. &quot;God didn't create the atomic bomb,&quot; she remarked, &quot;we did – and we can un-create it.&quot;</p><span style="font-family: Verdana;">According to a Gallup Poll Joan Chittister cited, 84% of respondents thought that helping the poor ranks first out of the 12 most important elements of Catholicism. She further stated that the Coalition on Human Needs reported that in the period from 2002 - 2006, 46 out of 72 programs that directly serve the poor were cut. Further, she pointed out, the Senate voted to reduce 55 programs and the House 62. Among the questions Pax Christi Memphis considered was, &quot;If our goal is “to serve the poor,” how do we, as a Christian people, respond to our government?&quot; A lively discussion ensued.Sister Joan Chittister will be the featured speaker at this year's Vanderhaar Symposium, April 15th at Christian Brothers University. Janice Vanderhaar was on hand to provide additional information on the symposium, which will begin at 7 p.m. in the University Theatre.Pax Christi Memphis agreed to support an initiative by the Memphis Center for Independent Living advocating Visitable Homes, Visitable Communities. The initiative asks that new residences built with federal funds in Memphis be constructed with one entrance with zero steps, 32 inches clear passage through all interior doors, including bathrooms, and at least a half bath on the main floor. Visitability would allow residents to welcome guests who use wheelchairs or walkers, or have some other mobility impairment. Many other benefits would be enjoyed by visitors and residents. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.concretechange.org/">www.concretechange.org</a>.</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> </div><div style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">(Thanks to Paul Crum for this summary.)</span><br /><div style="text-align: left;"> <span style="font-family: Verdana; color: rgb(118, 146, 60);"><b><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">April Meeting</span></b></span>Members present on April 6 will have the opportunity to signify in writing their support for the OREPA demonstration at the Oak Ridge Y-12 nuclear plant on the weekend of April 12. <span style="font-family: Verdana;">Our agenda will include the viewing of a one-hour documentary, <b><i>Nuclear Rescue 911: Broken Arrows &amp; Incidents, </i></b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;">that reveals the truth about destructive nuclear weapons accidents -- known as &quot;broken arrow&quot; disasters -- that have occurred since 1945. The public has been kept in the dark about these terrible mistakes, but now much of this info has been declassified. On more than one occasion, nuclear bombs have come dangerously close to being detonated and harming millions of people.</span></div></div><p> </p><p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b>Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm. </b></span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt; line-height: normal; color: rgb(255, 255, 255);" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b>Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)</b></span></p> <span style="font-family: Verdana;"><b>Visit us at </b></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><a href="http://www.paxchristimemphis.org/"><b>www.paxchristimemphis.org/</b></a></span><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes</span>       <br /></span></span><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Number 2,  February 2010</span></span></span><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Verdana,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;"><br />  <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-style: italic;">“The nonviolent approach does not immediately change the heart of the oppressor. It first does something to the hearts and souls of those committed to it. It gives them new self-respect; it calls up resources of strength and courage they did not know they had.”</span><br style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-style: italic;" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-style: italic;"> -- Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</span><br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">February Meeting</span><br />        “Thou Shalt Not Love: The Impertinent Color Brown,” the video presentation of a talk by Richard Rodriquez, was the main event of the meeting. The speaker made the point that our society is characterized by a wide range of skin colors, and that the complexion of U.S. society is changing. We are a people of many gifts that can be matched with the needs of all our people. Our history has been inundated with teaching about hate: wars, conflicts, discrimination. Fear sets up the barriers that we see keeping people apart. It is love that is bringing about the browning of America and the inclusion of all kinds of people who love one another. This is hope for us in the church as well as society at large. Rodriguez left us with questions, among them “what can we talk about in the church?”<br />         <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">March Meeting</span><br />        Our next meeting will feature a video presentation by Sister Joan Chittister, “Rise up People of God: A Spirituality for the Times.” This talk will give a foretaste of Sister Joan’s visit to Memphis at the Vanderhaar Symposium which will take place on April 15 at Christian Brothers University.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Thanks to Linda Raiteri</span><br />        We are grateful to Linda for her several years’ service as treasurer of Pax Christi Memphis. On February 15, she turned the ledger over the Jerry Bettice who volunteered to take care of the bookkeeping and pay the bills.  Our current balance is $527.39.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">A Reflection: Howard Zinn (1922-2010)</span><br />“On the other side are formidable forces: money, political power, the major media. On our side are the people of the world and a power greater than money or weapons: the truth. Truth has a power of its own. That age-old lesson -- that everything we do matters -- is the meaning of the people’s struggle here in the United States and everywhere. A poem can inspire a movement. A pamphlet can spark a revolution. Civil disobedience can arouse people and provoke us to think. When we organize with one another, when we get involved, when we stand up and speak out together, we can create a power no government can suppress.”<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Resources</span><br /></span></span></p><ul><li value="0"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Verdana,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">The DVD of “Thou Shalt Not Love” can be viewed by anyone who would like to see it again or for the first time.</span></span></li><li value="0"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Verdana,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">“One Border, One Body” is a 30-minute film documenting a mass celebrated along the border between Mexico and the U.S. with the fence that separates “us from them”.</span></span></li></ul><p><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: Verdana,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Contact Judy Bettice at 327-8068<br /> <br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/ <br /></span></span></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">News and Notes</span><br /><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px ! important;">Number 1, January 2010</span></span></span></span><br />A Season for Nonviolence started as a national 64-day educational, media, and grassroots campaign dedicated to demonstrating that nonviolence is a powerful way to heal, transform, and empower our lives and our communities. Inspired by the 50th and 30th memorial anniversaries of Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this international event honors their vision for an empowered, nonviolent world.<br />Website of Kansas State University<br /><a href="http://www.k-state.edu/nonviolence/Season/index.htm">www.k-state.edu/nonviolence/Season/index.htm</a><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);"><br /></span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">A Season for Nonviolence</span><br />This observance runs from January 30 to April 4. At the website shown above there are 64 practices of nonviolence suggested, one for each day of the observance. This season overlaps the Christian season of Lent and offers opportunities for the deep conversion of heart and of life that Lent challenges us to embrace. The practices recommended span the personal, interpersonal and communitarian aspects of our lives. In the spirit of nonviolence exemplified by Gandhi and King our conscious efforts help us grow closer to being the Beloved Community we hope to be.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">January Meeting</span><br />On January 5, the Memphis Pax Christi community joined in renewing the Vow of Nonviolence at the start of the meeting.<br />After the time for prayer, Ed Wallin shared with the community gathered his knowledge of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). Ed recounted both his personal experience and his clinical experiences as a counselor. His presentation included a film on PTSD, and there was also sharing of views from the members present.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010 </span><br />Dr. Scott Morris, of the Church Health Center in Memphis, will be introducing a screening of the documentary, “Getwell,” which discusses Memphis healthcare issues and what the Church Health Center is doing to address healthcare issues in Memphis.  He will also be answering questions about the future of healthcare in America following the screening.  The event will take place Thursday, Feb. 4th at 7pm in Blount Auditorium at Rhodes College.  Upon entering campus, Campus Safety will point you in the right direction.  Please e-mail Allison at dovam@rhodes.edu for more information or with questions.<br />         <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Study Prayer Action</span><br />Two local issues are in the news at this time, namely, violence in our schools and infant mortality, the latter being described in the WKNO presentation of “Beyond Babyland.”<br />How do these matters challenge Pax Christi Memphis? How informed are we? How do these concerns enter our prayer life? How can we make a difference in the way they are addressed?<br /> <br />Charity in Truth (Pope Benedict XVI) Other cultures and religions teach brotherhood and peace and are therefore of enormous importance to integral human development. (#55)<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Dues</span><br />Dues for Pax Christi USA and for our local chapter may be submitted at any time to Linda Raiteri our treasurer.<br /> <br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/</p><p><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-size: 14px ! important;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></span><br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0); font-weight: bold;">News and Notes</span><br /><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px;"><span style="font-size: 8px ! important;">Number 1, January 2010</span></span></span></span><br />A Season for Nonviolence started as a national 64-day educational, media, and grassroots campaign dedicated to demonstrating that nonviolence is a powerful way to heal, transform, and empower our lives and our communities. Inspired by the 50th and 30th memorial anniversaries of Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this international event honors their vision for an empowered, nonviolent world.<br />Website of Kansas State University<br /><a href="http://www.k-state.edu/nonviolence/Season/index.htm">www.k-state.edu/nonviolence/Season/index.htm</a><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);"><br /> </span></p> <p><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">A Season for Nonviolence</span><br /> This observance runs from January 30 to April 4. At the website shown above there are 64 practices of nonviolence suggested, one for each day of the observance. This season overlaps the Christian season of Lent and offers opportunities for the deep conversion of heart and of life that Lent challenges us to embrace. The practices recommended span the personal, interpersonal and communitarian aspects of our lives. In the spirit of nonviolence exemplified by Gandhi and King our conscious efforts help us grow closer to being the Beloved Community we hope to be.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">January Meeting</span><br />On January 5, the Memphis Pax Christi community joined in renewing the Vow of Nonviolence at the start of the meeting.<br />After the time for prayer, Ed Wallin shared with the community gathered his knowledge of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). Ed recounted both his personal experience and his clinical experiences as a counselor. His presentation included a film on PTSD, and there was also sharing of views from the members present.<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010 </span><br />Dr. Scott Morris, of the Church Health Center in Memphis, will be introducing a screening of the documentary, “Getwell,” which discusses Memphis healthcare issues and what the Church Health Center is doing to address healthcare issues in Memphis.  He will also be answering questions about the future of healthcare in America following the screening.  The event will take place Thursday, Feb. 4th at 7pm in Blount Auditorium at Rhodes College.  Upon entering campus, Campus Safety will point you in the right direction.  Please e-mail Allison at dovam@rhodes.edu for more information or with questions.<br />         <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Study Prayer Action</span><br />Two local issues are in the news at this time, namely, violence in our schools and infant mortality, the latter being described in the WKNO presentation of “Beyond Babyland.”<br />How do these matters challenge Pax Christi Memphis? How informed are we? How do these concerns enter our prayer life? How can we make a difference in the way they are addressed?<br /> <br />Charity in Truth (Pope Benedict XVI) Other cultures and religions teach brotherhood and peace and are therefore of enormous importance to integral human development. (#55)<br /> <br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 0);">Dues</span><br />Dues for Pax Christi USA and for our local chapter may be submitted at any time to Linda Raiteri our treasurer.<br /> <br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/</p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Number 12, December 2009</span><br /><br />Pax Christi USA Priority Areas<br />(paxchristiusa.org/about_statement_purpose.asp)<br />° Spirituality of Nonviolence and Peacemaking<br />° Disarmament, Demilitarization and Reconciliation with Justice<br />° Economic and Interracial Justice in the United States<br />° Human Rights and Global Restoration:<br /><br />December Meeting<br />In the first part of the meeting, Paul Crum reported on the visit that he and his wife Pat made to Fort Benning, Georgia, for the SOA watch. The School of the Americas (SOA), now known as the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation, is located there. The vigil was attended by thousands, but its founder, Maryknoll Fr. Roy Bourgeois was unable to attend because of the serious illness of his father. Paul and Pat joined other members of Pax Christ USA in its gathering for presentations focusing on peace issues of current importance.<br />Paul alerted us to the campaign to avoid “Killer Coke” because of atrocities involving the soft drink maker in Colombia. (More information can be found at the website www.killercoke.org.)<br />Paul was impressed at the vigil by the young people, especially college students, who showed up, and by the number of persons from Jesuit universities.<br />Paul and Pat carried the Pax Christi Memphis banner in the Sunday morning solemn funeral procession remembering all those killed in Latin America by graduates of the School of the Americas.<br />Altonette Stone spoke, in the second part of the meeting, about four goals being set by Pax Christi USA. These will be publicized early in 2010. She also proposed that we invite Tom Cordaro, who is a Pax Christi Ambassador of Peace and who has written a book on fear and responses to terrorism, to speak in Memphis. Altonette’s proposal received a positive response, but no specific plans were concretized.<br />The assembled group did reach consensus on collecting dues for our local chapter and for the national office at the same time; we will ask our treasurer to submit the national dues all at one time.<br />[Note: Regular membership in Pax Christi USA is $35 per year. Out local dues are: $15 for an individual, $20 for a couple, and $5 for a person on limited income.]<br />The last item of business was the approval of an ad for the program of the annual Mid-South Peace and Justice Center dinner in January. The ad costs $250 and includes 4 tickets to the dinner. At the time of this discussion there were four persons who agreed to contribute $40 per ticket to our local chapter. That means that Pax Christi Memphis as a chapter will spend only $160 net for the ad. Paul Crum will take care of submitting the ad.<br /><br />January Meeting<br />On January 5, Ed Wallin will make a presentation about veterans returning from the wars the United States has been fighting in various parts of the world. Ed will be addressing the impact of combat on our military personnel.<br />We will also renew the Vow of Nonviolence at this meeting. After reading and reflecting on the Vow of Nonviolence, people often commit themselves to trying to follow it daily for a year.<br />The text is as follows:<br /><span style="font-style: italic;">RECOGNIZING THE VIOLENCE IN MY OWN HEART, yet trusting in the goodness and mercy of God, I vow for one year to practice the nonviolence of Jesus who taught us in the Sermon on the Mount:</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the sons and daughters of God...You have learned how it was said, &quot;You must love your neighbor and hate your enemy&quot;; but I say to you, &quot;Love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you. In this way, you will be daughters and sons of your Creator in heaven.&quot;</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">Before God the Creator and the Sanctifying Spirit, I vow to carry out in my life the love and example of Jesus</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">by striving for peace within myself and seeking to be a peacemaker in my daily life;</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">by accepting suffering rather than inflicting it;</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">by refusing to retaliate in the face of provocation and violence;</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">by persevering in nonviolence of tongue and heart;</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">by living conscientiously and simply so that I do not deprive others of the means to live;</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">by actively resisting evil and working nonviolently to abolish war and the causes of war from my own heart and from the face of the earth.</span><br style="font-style: italic;" /><br style="font-style: italic;" /><span style="font-style: italic;">God, I trust in Your sustaining love and believe that just as You gave me the grace and desire to offer this, so You will also bestow abundant grace to fulfill it.</span><br /><br />I commit myself to living according to the Vow of Nonviolence for a one year period.<br /><br />Dues<br />Please bring your dues for the national office and for our local chapter to the January meeting.<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br /><br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/</p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Number 11, November 2009</span><br /><br />Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms in not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.<br />President Dwight D. Eisenhower<br />April 16, 1953<br /><br />November Meeting<br /><br />Report by Paul Crum<br />Nearly 50 people, most of them first-time guests, crowded into our meeting room at Church of the Holy Spirit to view the documentary Rethink Afghanistan from Brave New Films at our regular meeting on November 3rd. The film, divided into seven &quot;chapters&quot; dealt with topics such as,<br />Troop Levels<br />Pakistan<br />The Cost of War<br />Women in Afghanistan<br />Civilian Casualties<br />Security<br />Solutions<br />Copies of &quot;A Prayer for the People of Afghanistan&quot;, by the late Jim McGinnis, were distributed and used to open the meeting. It was noted that October 2009 had been the deadliest month of the war so far for American troops, with 58 of them losing their lives. President Obama is currently considering a request for the deployment of 40,000 more troops in Afghanistan.<br />The discussion following the film revealed that many had never heard the distinction between Taliban fighters and Al Qaeda forces explained, and several expressed their dismay at the amount of wasteful and fraudulent spending the documentary revealed. One guest told us her son was currently serving as a civilian contractor in Afghanistan, and related some of what he had experienced there. Prayers were offered for his safety.<br />Notes from the documentary were provided with some additional background information on the region and the conflict. Those attending were urged to visit http://noescalation.org, a website dealing with efforts in the legislature to prohibit an increase in troops (HR 3699 introduced by Rep. Barbara Lee of California), and a bill calling for an exit strategy (HR 2404 by Rep. Jim McGovern of Massachusetts.) The website provides a means for contacting your representative and/or to check their position on the bills.<br />Our thanks to Pat Crum for providing popcorn and soft drinks, and to others who contributed treats.<br />Anyone who wishes to show the documentary to another group, or with family and friends, may contact Paul Crum at 266-2464.<br /><br />December Meeting<br />The meeting of December 1 will be devoted to reports from members who have travelled to the School of the Americas weekend, November 20-22 at Fort Benning, Georgia, from attendees at the annual Call To Action Conference in Milwaukee, and from the Pax Christi Anti-Racism Team.<br /><br />For the Activist<br />Resources on Afghanistan may be found at www.paxchristiusa.org/news_Events_more.asp?id=1539<br />There are resources on other issues also at<br />http://www.paxchristiusa.org/<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br /><br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/<br /><br /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Number 10, October 2009</span><br /><br />After eight years of U.S. military engagement in Afghanistan, violence and instability still prevail. The military approach to Afghanistan is not succeeding; further application of American military force will not bring stability to the country or security to our own.<br />With over 90 percent of U.S. funding in Afghanistan directed toward military purposes, non-military strategic options are not being pursued. The problems facing Afghan society are economic, social and political in nature, and require economic, social and political solutions. The U.S. can play a more constructive role in Afghanistan by engaging civil society than by waging war. (http://rethinkafghanistan.com/)<br /><br />October Meeting<br />Fr. Al Kirk presided at the memorial Eucharist for Jim McGinnis that was celebrated just before our usual meeting time.<br />Our local community of Pax Christi welcomed Bobbie Donnelly after a long absence as well as new members Larry and Judy Fischer to our gathering.<br />The meeting included letter writing in support of the Peaceable Assembly Campaign which seeks an end to the U.S. wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan and an end to U.S. support for the continued occupation of the Palestinian territories. Sr. Nic Catrambone and the Fischers kindly provided stamps for our mailing.<br />After the letter writing our discussion focused on the address of Bishop Zavala that was given in Washington earlier this year. Marjorie Steakley provided information about the bomb the bishop referred to.<br />In our extended discussion there were suggestions about topics for 2010 meetings. A dialogue on immigration is one issue, and we gave consideration to asking for input from the diocesan Department of Multicultural Ministries.<br /><br />November Meeting<br />Rethink Afghanistan, a ground-breaking, full-length documentary focusing on the key issues surrounding the war in Afghanistan, will be screened at Church of the Holy Spirit. Socializing may take place at 6:45 pm but will end in time to allow the film to begin promptly at 7:00 pm. Our thanks to Paul Crum for procuring this film for this screening. More information about the film is available at http://rethinkafghanistan.com/.<br /><br />B61 nuclear bomb<br />The B61 nuclear bomb is the primary thermonuclear weapon in the U.S. Enduring Stockpile following the end of the Cold War.<br />The B61, originally known (before 1968) as the TX-61, was designed in 1963. It was designed and built by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. It began from a program for a lightweight, streamlined weapon launched in 1961. Production engineering began in 1965, with full production beginning in 1968 following a series of development problems.<br />Total production of all versions was approximately 3,155, of which approximately 1,925 remain in service as of 2002, and some 1,265 are considered to be operational. The warhead has changed little over the years, although early versions have been upgraded to improve the safety features.<br />Nine versions of the B61 have been produced. Each shares the same 'physics package,' with different yield options.<br />Though exact numbers are hard to establish, research done by the Natural Resources Defense Council suggests approximately 480 are deployed with United States Air Force units in various European countries.<br />The newest variant of the B61 is a hardened penetration bomb with a reinforced casing (according to some sources, containing depleted uranium) and a delayed-action fuse, allowing it to penetrate several meters into the ground before detonating, damaging fortified structures further underground.<br />Most versions of the B61 are equipped with a parachute retarder (currently a 24-ft (7.3 m) diameter nylon/Kevlar chute) to slow the weapon in its descent, giving the aircraft a chance to escape the blast (or to allow the weapon to survive impact with the ground in laydown mode).<br />The U.S. is refurbishing the B61 bombs under its Life Extension Program with the intention that the weapons should remain operational until at least 2025.<br />(Note: The content of this article has been modified by the editor.)<br /><br />Actions<br />Bishop Zavala has suggested that we write to President Obama to encourage him to continue working for nuclear disarmament. Please send your requests to the White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20500.<br />After seeing the film Rethink Afghanistan, members may want to write to their representatives in Washington to express concern.<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br /><br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/<br /><br />Other resources may be found at<br />http://www.paxchristiusa.org/<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Newsletter Addendum</span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Meeting of October 6</span><br />There will be a memorial Mass for Jim McGinnis at 6:30 in the chapel of the Church of the Holy Spirit. Our regular meeting will take place after the Mass.<br />At this meeting the members of our chapter will have the opportunity to express support in action for the Peaceable Assembly Campaign. Voices for Creative Nonviolence has initiated a nationwide Peaceable Assembly Campaign which seeks an end to the U.S. wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan and an end to U.S. support for the continued occupation of the Palestinian territories. An overview of the campaign was sent to all on our mailing list with the last issue of News and Notes. Bring to the meeting the names and addresses of your congressional representatives and Senators with writing materials to send messages to Congress on behalf of the Campaign.<br />We will discuss the recent address of Bishop Gabino Zavala, Episcopal President of Pax Christi USA. The address is attached.<br />Pax Christi: To create a world that reflects the Peace of Christ</p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Number 9, September 2009</span><br /><br />The life of the arts, far from being an interruption, a distraction, in the life of a nation, is very close to the center of a nation’s purpose—and it is a test of the quality of a nation’s civilization. (John F. Kennedy)<br /><br />Meeting of September 1<br />The assembled community viewed a video presentation, “Jacob Lawrence: An Intimate Portrait.” In the discussion that followed the members present reflected on the role of art in our life and in the struggle for inclusivity in our movement and in society.<br /><br />Meeting of October 6<br />There will be a memorial Mass for Jim McGinnis at 6:30 in the chapel of the Church of the Holy Spirit. Our regular meeting will take place after the Mass.<br />At this meeting the members of our chapter will have the opportunity to express support in action for the Peaceable Assembly Campaign. Voices for Creative Nonviolence has initiated a nationwide Peaceable Assembly Campaign which seeks an end to the U.S. wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan and an end to U.S. support for the continued occupation of the Palestinian territories. An overview of the campaign is being sent to all on our mailing list with this issue of news and notes.<br />Bring to the meeting the names and addresses of your congressional representatives and Senators with writing materials to send messages to Congress on behalf of the Campaign.<br /><br />Redbirds Outing<br />Several members enjoyed seeing the Memphis Redbirds win their game on September 6, the day before Labor Day. The evening was capped by a spectacular fireworks display.<br /><br />Workers Interfaith<br />Thanks to those who sat at the Pax Christi table and visited with picnic goers at the Faith and Labor Picnic on Labor Day. Thanks to all who support the Workers Interfaith Network and the mission they follow to bring justice to workers in our area.<br /><br />Gandhi Conference On Peacemaking<br />The conference features<br />• training and education in nonviolent theory and practice through tools to engage in social change.<br />• opportunities for networking and peer-to-peer learning with movement builders from all over the country.<br />• an entry point for community members to become engaged in movement work.<br />• involvement in working groups that will continue the work throughout the year.<br />• a nexus of people who are new to the movement and movement leaders to share and inspire action in a cross-cultural and inter-generational environment.<br />• the opportunity to learn about best practices and develop new ones based upon our shared experience.<br />Dates: October 23-25<br />Venue: Christian Brothers University<br />Contact: Mid South Peace and Justice Center<br />1000 South Cooper Street Memphis, TN 38104<br />901.725.4990<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br /><br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/<br /><br />Other resources may be found at<br />http://www.paxchristiusa.org/<br /><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Number 8, August 2009</span><br /><br />Lord, make us instruments of your peace.<br /><br />Meeting of August 4<br /><br /> The August 4th Pax Christi Memphis meeting was well attended and produced a fruitful discussion.<br /><br />Altonette Stone led our opening prayer, and shared with us the details of the tragic accident that resulted in the passing of Deacon Bob Atkins from St. Augustine. Others in our group shared their memories of Deacon Bob and the important role he played at St. Augustine. Our prayers will be with the parish as they deal with their painful loss in the weeks ahead.<br /><br />We were pleased to have a special guest, Deacon Jorge Cepedes, who will be in residence at Holy Spirit throughout the summer. Deacon Jorge brought insightful contributions to our discussion and promised to return to Pax Christi while in Memphis.<br /><br />The group congratulated Fr. Al Kirk (&quot;... I don't care what you call me, just don't call me Monsignor!&quot;) on his recent appointment from Rome. Our group extended blessings upon his continued ministry and thanked him for his important support of Pax Christi Memphis, and for being on the side of peace and justice issues.<br /><br />We concluded our study of Dismantling Racism by Joseph Barndt, with a discussion of Chapter 7, &quot;From Racism to Pluralism&quot;. Each member offered a reflection on what they had gained from the study of this book and the ensuing discussion. As usual, or members brought profound, thought provoking remarks to the table. Though the dialogue has been painfully honest at times, we have all benefitted from the study of racism in our society.<br /><br />Altonette, Randy, Ed and Janice all reported on the Pax Christi USA Convention held in Chicago last month. They shared information on the speakers they heard, the people they met, and the sessions in which they participated. All four were veryenthusiastic and &quot;fired up&quot; about interjecting someof the ideas they returned with into our future meetings. Their reports segued into a brief discussion of future programs that the planning committee has considered. Ideas include a series of films and speakers that would loosely tie into the writings of Pope Benedict's encyclical letter on integral human development in charity and truth, Caritas in Veritate. It was announced that Jerry and Judy Bettice will be leading a study of this document at St. Patrick Learning Center October 1, 8 &amp; 15 from 7 - 9 pm. Pax Christi Memphis will support the study and may even attempt to organize transportation to the series.<br /><br />Altonette may also center a future meeting around a Q&amp;A Excercise that was used at the PC National Convention. Several other possibilities for future programs were mentioned as well. Janice made announcements about the Peaceable Assembly Campaign, and also talked briefly about the upcoming Gandhi-King Conference.<br /><br />Ray distributed tickets to those who had responded to his generous invitation for an outing to the Redbirds baseball game September 6th.Paul reported a request from our friend Ceylon Mooney to help publicize and attend a booksigning at Davis-Kidd, 6 pm on Monday, August 17, by his friend Rev. Bill Crumley. The topic, “Why we're always broke: a catholic priest on bailouts, banks and bombs” is based on his just released book.<br /><br />(Notes by Paul Crum)<br /><br />Jim McGinnis<br /><br />We mourn the passing of Jim McGinnis, long-time peace maker. Jim’s other persona was Francis the Clown who appeared in the cause of peace in front of the White House and elsewhere.<br /><br />Jim, with his wife Kathy, founded the Institute for Peace and Justice. They also founded the Parenting for Peace and Justice Network. Jim wrote a series of manuals for peace and justice education in schools.<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br /><br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/<br /></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Number 7, July 2009</span><br />Children, let us love not in word or speech but in deed and truth. (Now) this is how we shall know that we belong to the truth…. (1 John 3: 18, 19)<br />Meeting of July 7<br />In this gathering the members present shared experiences of racism, especially in relation to the church. Then, three members presented summaries of Chapter 6 in Dismantling Racism; this section of the book focused on “White Racism and the Church.” Discussion of the topic followed and dealt mostly with the matter of religion and culture.<br />Meeting of August 4<br />The assigned reading for the meeting is Chapter 7 of Dismantling Racism, “From Racism to Pluralism.” Members are asked to be prepared to reflect upon this final chapter, and also on what they have gained from the study and discussion of Barndt's book. Comments should be limited to about three minutes. If anyone needs photo copies of the chapter, they may contact Paul Crum by phone or email, and he will mail them. Contact information: pcrum@bartlettart.com or 901-266-2464.<br />There will be time set aside for discussion about where we go from here in terms of topics. &quot;Charity in Truth,&quot; the recent encyclical of Pope Benedict XVI on Catholic social teaching, has been cited as a possible study that the group can adopt if it's something we may want to pursue. An associated suggestion is the possibility of Pax Christi Memphis providing the stimulus for engaging others outside our group in prayer and fasting and acts of charity to feed the hungry and provide for the poor.<br />Feedback<br />This format of the newsletter has been presented for two and a half years now. Your<br />suggestions are requested. Feedback on how<br />many on the mailing list actually read the newsletter is most welcome, first of all. Then the question, is the newsletter<br />· dull and stagnant?<br />· informative?<br />· promoting the aims of Pax Christi—prayer, study, action?<br />· reflective of members’ concerns?<br />· necessary in the future?<br />Caritas in Veritate, Paragraph 1., inclusive version<br />Charity in truth, to which Jesus Christ bore witness by his earthly life and especially by his death and resurrection, is the principal driving force behind the authentic development of every person and of all humanity. Love— caritas—is an extraordinary force which leads people to opt for courageous and generous engagement in the field of justice and peace. It is a force that has its origin in God, Eternal Love and Absolute Truth. All persons find their good by adherence to God's plan for them, in order to realize it fully: in this plan, they find their truth, and through adherence to this truth they becomes free (cf. John 8:22). To defend the truth, to articulate it with humility and conviction, and to bear witness to it in life are therefore exacting and indispensable forms of charity. Charity, in fact, “rejoices in the truth” (1 Cor 13:6). All people feel the interior impulse to love authentically: love and truth never abandon them completely, because these are the vocation planted by God in the heart and mind of every human person. The search for love and truth is purified and liberated by Jesus Christ from the impoverishment that our humanity brings to it, and he reveals to us in all its fullness the initiative of love and the plan for true life that God has prepared for us. In Christ, charity in truth becomes the Face of his Person, a vocation for us to love our brothers and sisters in the truth of his plan. Indeed, he himself is the Truth (cf. John 14:6).<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br />Visit us at www.paxchristimemphis.org/</p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Numbers 5/6, May/June 2009</span><br /><br />There is certainly no lack nowadays of people who delight in asking endless questions just to have something to babble about, but it is difficult to find someone who loves truth in his soul, who seeks the truth as medicine for his ignorance.<br />-On the Holy Spirit (St. Basil the Great)<br />Meeting of May 5<br />Our May meeting was devoted mostly to discussion of financial matters in relation to future expenditures to support other programs. John Ward, Judy Bettice and Altonette Stone volunteered to serve as an ad hoc fundraising committee. The details of other decisions have been sent to members in a separate email in May. Those details are available to anyone who needs them by contacting Jerry Bettice.<br />Meeting of June 7<br />There were two guest speakers who came to our gathering to address Health Care in the United States. Emily Fulmer of the Tennessee Health Care Campaign (THCC) and Dr. Art Sutherland the Tennessee Chair of Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) presented their ideas, and a discussion by those present followed.<br />Health care as a basic human right is a principle behind the proposals presented. The speakers were advocating for national health care reform that is just and provides health care for all Americans. Jim Wallis of Sojourners was quoted in regard to justice and charity. Charity is commendable, but justice creates a social order committed to all persons, even those not served by the works of charity.<br />The idea of a single payer system was offered as the best way to provide the best coverage for all Americans, but it was pointed out that this proposed program will see the longest struggle for adoption by the Congress. The single payer system is not socialized medicine and depends on private providers. Advocates for health care reform are seeking an approach that will pass and that will work to reach the goal of coverage for all.<br />In the discussion it was pointed out that much of what was being presented is rooted in Catholic social teaching.<br />It is possible that a copy of Sick Around the World, a documentary on health care, might be available for viewing at some time in the future.<br />The single payer bill presented by Congressman John Conyers is HR 676. There is a Senate bill that has been presented also; its number is S 703. Both merit our attention and support.<br />On June 22 there will be program on “Faith and Health Care Justice.” Details will be forthcoming and will be sent to Pax Christi members.<br />More information on the THCC can be found at www.health4all-wtn.org.<br />The website for PNHP is www.pnhp.org.<br /><br />Next Meeting<br />For our next meeting of Pax Christi Memphis read Chapter 6 “White Racism and the Church” in Dismantling Racism. If you need a copy of this material, contact Jerry Bettice.<br />Condolences<br />We send our prayers and encouragement to Joe Kyle whose daughter died on June 2.<br />Action<br />Call your members of Congress<br />(find your Representative and Senators at house.gov and senate.gov, or Capitol Switchboard: 202-224-3121) and tell them health care reform should:<br />• Include health care coverage for all people from conception until natural death, and continue the federal ban on funding for abortions;<br />• Include access for all with a special concern for the poor;<br />• Pursue the common good and preserve pluralism, including freedom of conscience; and<br />• Restrain costs and apply costs equitably among payers.<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis meets on the first Tuesday of each month at Church of the Holy Spirit, 7 pm.<br />Contact: 327-8068 (Jerry Bettice)<br /></p><p><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">News and Notes </span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">No.4 April 2009</span><br /><br />Possessed by Possessions, Jim Wallis<br /><br />The affluent are literally possessed by their possessions. Money and the things it can buy stalks the rich countries like a demon. Mammon offers comforts and pleasures to delight the flesh but demands the soul in return. The attachment of Americans to their standard of living has become an addiction. We can't stop shopping, eating, consuming....<br /><br />A successful life leads not to love, wisdom and maturity; progress and success in our society is instead based on adding more to one's pile of possessions. Our natural course is toward a better job, bigger house and richer lifestyle....<br /><br />Material goods have become substitutes for faith. It's not that people literally place their cars on the altar; rather, it is the function of these goods in a consumer society. They function as idols, even though most affluent U.S. Christians, like rich Christians throughout history, would deny it.<br />(Source: The Call to Conversion, shared by the School of Servant Leadership)<br /><br />April 7 Meeting<br /><br /> Our local Pax Christi community discussed Dismantling Racism, pages 87 through 108, which covered the topics of institutional racism and cultural racism. There was also consideration given to various requests from other groups for financial support. Also brought up was the possibility of inviting Tom Cordaro, author of Be Not Afraid, to come to Memphis as part of his speaking tour; the need for raising funds for such a project and the other issues of drawing upon our treasury are tabled until our May meeting.<br /><br /> <br /><br />Pax Christi Anti-Racism Team (PCART)<br /><br /> Recently, Altonette Stone and Randy Gamble traveled to San Antonio to attend a meeting of PCART. In our May gathering Altonette will give a report on that event.<br /><br />May 5<br /><br /> Our monthly meeting will be held at Church of the Holy Spirit, 2300 Hickory Crest Drive 38119. Our opening prayer will be at 7:15 pm. Come early to socialize and meet and greet. The meeting lasts about 90 minutes with concluding prayer at 8:55 pm.<br /><br />Special Request<br /><br /> Our friend John Thomas in Westwood, New Jersey has provided the information that follows to be shared with our readers and members.<br /><br /> * 33 U.S. Veterans attempt suicide daily in the VA System… 18 succeed… over 6,500 kill themselves every year. [CBS News]<br /> * 620,000 U.S. Veterans returning from our wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are suffering from either Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). [RAND Corp]<br /> * 1 out of every 4 homeless people in America is a U.S. Veteran. 1 out of every 4 females in the U.S. military is sexually harassed by her own troops. [Department of Defense]<br /> * Over 260,000 U.S. Veterans are in prison here in America. (VFP Newsletter] What will you do to help our Veterans?<br /> * California alone has spent $83.1 billion on the Iraq War. How much has New Jersey spent? (How much has Tennessee spent?)<br /><br />Reflection:<br /><br /> Peace be with you. As Abba God has sent me, so I’m sending you. (John 20:21 in The Inclusive Bible: The First Egalitarian Translation)<br /><br />Every first Tuesday of the month, Pax Christi Memphis meets at the Church of the Holy Spirit, 2300 Hickory Crest Drive, 38119, at 7:15 pm. Check out our website at www.paxchristimemphis.org<br /></p><p style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">Pax Christi Memphis</p><p><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">News and Notes</span><br style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);" /><span style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">No.3 March 2009</span><br /><br />Christ is our peace. (Ephesians 2:14)<br /><br />March 3 Meeting<br />Stevie Moore, founder of Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives (F.F.U.N.) spoke of his organization’s work with the youth of Memphis. Stevie visits youth in a local prison. With many volunteers he also works to improve the environment in Memphis City Schools, which have a majority of urban youth of color. There he works to reduce the number of incidents of violence.<br />Since our meeting we have received notice of the next “Stop the Killing” rally sponsored by F.F.U.N. The rally will have taken place by the time this newsletter arrives in our members’ mail boxes. However, the following statement from the press release announcing the rally captures the heart of the message Pax Christi members heard in Mr. Moore’s presentation:<br />&quot;The faith based and community based organizations are key in affecting change in our youth and neighborhoods. Both provide continuous support, strong leadership and offer holistic solutions to their economic, civic and social needs. Youth today lack self esteem and have attached themselves to so much negativity and violence. Celebrating black history (the sacrifices, the dreams, and the accomplishments) provides positive messages. In addition, show how non-violence helps shape America today.”<br /><br />April Gathering<br /><br /> Our discussion continues in Dismantling Racism, pages 87 - 122. For those who do not have the book, copies of relevant sections will be provided at the time of the meeting.<br /> <br /><br /><br />White Privilege Conference<br /><br /> Dates: April 1 – 4, 2009<br /> Location: Hilton Memphis, 939 Ridge Lake Boulevard, Memphis, TN 38120<br /> Rate for entire conference: $315 before March 6, 2009; $330 after March 6, 2009<br /> Rate for single day: $125<br /> More information is found at http://www.uccs.edu/~wpc/index.htm<br /> <br /><br /> Vanderhaar Symposium<br /><br /> Congratulations to Janice Vanderhaar, Paul Crum and Fr. Al Kirk, members of our local chapter of Pax Christi and the others on the Symposium steering committee for the inspiring and challenging visit with Jane Goodall at Christian Brothers University on March 19. Several members of our Pax Christi community were present with a full house to hear Dr. Goodall.<br /> In her lecture the world renowned primatologist directed the attention of our minds and hearts to the web of life and God’s creative wisdom in fashioning our planet and life on it. Her appeal was especially passionate in regard to our youth who will inherit the condition of the earth that we leave them.<br /> Dr. Goodall sees great hope in the imagination of our youth, in the resilience of nature and in the potential of the human spirit. Her challenge to all of us is to plant the seeds of peace and harmony in our world. In small ways each of us can contribute to a holistic approach to the earth’s problems that will promote the sustainability of the human community. <br /> <br /><br /> Reflection:<br /> The earth and its fullness are the Lord's. (1 Corinthians 10:26)<br /> <br /> Now with you is Wisdom, who knows your works and was present when you made the world.<br /> (Wisdom 9:9)<br /> <br /> <br /> Every first Tuesday of the month, Pax Christi Memphis meets<br /> at the Church of the Holy Spirit, 2300 Hickory Crest Drive, 38119, at 7:15 pm.<br /> Check out our website at www.paxchristimemphis.org<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">Pax Christi Memphis</span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">News and Notes </span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">No.2, February 2009</span><br /><br />We cannot evade our responsibility by leaving peacemaking to our political leaders.<br /><br />-Peace Gift and Task by Bishop Dozier<br /><br />February 3 Gathering<br /><br /> Our discussion of Dismantling Racism: The Continuing Challenge to White America continued in a lively manner. There were divergent points of view expressed in the dialogue. The future promises to provide more animated exchanges before consensus comes about.<br /><br />March 3 Meeting<br /><br /> At the time of this publication, Stevie Moore of F.F.U.N. (Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives) has been invited to speak at our next meeting. So far, no commitment from Mr. Moore or his organization has come forth.<br /><br /> In the event that we have no speaker, we will continue our study and dialogue using the Dismantling Racism book. For those who do not have the book, copies of relevant sections will be provided—pages 87 - 122.<br /><br />White Privilege Conference<br /><br /> Dates: April 1 – 4, 2009<br /><br /> Location:<br /><br />Hilton Memphis<br />939 Ridge Lake Boulevard,<br />Memphis, TN 38120<br /><br /> Rate for entire conference:<br /><br /> $315 before March 6, 2009<br /><br /> $330 after March 6, 2009<br /><br /> Rate for single day: $125<br /><br /> More information is found at<br /><br /> http://www.uccs.edu/~wpc/index.htm<br /><br />Further Thoughts<br /><br />From Peace Gift and Task:<br /><br /> Let us go with Jesus in his temptations. Our modern confrontation with the tempter on the high mountain is the offer that we will have the homage of all the world, the regard given to the sole Superpower on the face of the Earth if we only worship the triplicit demon of war, greed, and racial hatred. Our wars and other conflicts are always brought about by means of the deals we make with that demon, justifying these contracts in the name of national security. The mongers of violence preach fear of the other, fear of losing our way of life and fear of being second class in the world community. Being first class requires us to consume most of the world’s resources in comparison with nations struggling to feed and house their people. Let us not look at nations but see our brothers and sisters whose dreams and aspirations for peace, harmony and material resources that allow people to live beyond the limits of mere survival. These latter conditions desired by all people are the hopes and joys presented by the Second Vatican Council in Gaudium et Spes the Pastoral Constitution of the Church in the Modern World.<br /><br /> When will Catholics recover their consciences and see war for immoral taking of life that it is?<br /><br />Reflection<br /><br /> Are we to make connections between the willingness of our nation to make war and gun violence in our city? What response do we have to the possibility of the Tennessee legislature liberalizing the law in regard to carrying concealed weapons, an issue that is directly before us at present? Another demon looking for a deal? Are there racial implications in the proposed legislation? <br /><br />Every first Tuesday of the month, Pax Christi Memphis meets at the Church of the Holy Spirit, 2300 Hickory Crest Drive, 38119, at 7:15 pm.<br /><br /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">Pax Christi Memphis</span></p><p><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">News and Notes</span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;" /><span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">Number 1, January 2009</span><br /><br />Message from Manuel Soto de Viera<br />“In your next ‘News and Notes’ for January, would you please thank in my name all those who so kindly signed a greeting card on my birthday.<br />“I was touched by &quot;y'all's&quot; gesture (pardon my Southern English).<br />“I am doing well, still in remission, though enduring some afflictions that have to do more with aging than with anything else (just learned this week, thanks to an MRI of the cervical spine, that I have &quot;degenerative arthritis&quot; in that area ---and here I was thinking that a lingering painful tightness of the back of the neck and both shoulders hampering my swimming exercises was solely due to muscular strain brought about by the vanity of emulating Michael Phelps [in my case, Johnny Weismuller...]!). Oh, well. I'll go back to swimming in a more commonsensical way.<br />“I would love to attend some Pax Christi meetings, but I'd need a ride. I am physically able to drive, but I shouldn't try it.<br />“Peace, Manuel.”<br /><br />Vow of Nonviolence Forms are available to those unable to make the vow with the local community at our recent meeting on January 6.<br /><br />Thanks to Renewing Members We thank those who have responded to our annual financial appeal.<br /><br />January 6 Gathering<br />Doris Bradshaw of Defense Depot of Memphis, Tennessee, Concerned Citizens Committee (DDMT-CCC) addressed our community on the topic of environmental racism. There is an appendix to this newsletter; it contains an extended account of Ms. Bradshaw’s presentation.<br />A copy of a speech by Robert Bullard, African American environmentalist, was given to the members present for the talk. If you wish to receive a copy of this item, “Growing Smarter: Achieving Livable Communities for All,” contact Jerry Bettice (information below).<br /><br />February 3 Meeting<br />We will be studying and discussing Joseph Barndt’s book Dismantling Racism: The Continuing Challenge to White America,<br />pages 75 – 115. Please read this section to prepare for our continuing dialogue.<br /><br />Peace Event<br />Scholar Judith Butler will speak on “Vulnerability, Survivability: The Affects of War&quot; on Thursday, January 29 at 6:30 PM Fogelman Executive Center. This event is free and open to the public.<br /><br />Contact Information for Jerry Call 327-8068 or write to 4043 Allison Avenue, Memphis, TN 38122.<br /><br />Every first Tuesday of the month, Pax Christi Memphis meets at the Church of the Holy Spirit,<br />2300 Hickory Crest Drive, 38119, at 7:15 pm.<br /><br />News bulletin contact: Jerry Bettice at 327-8068 or jbettice@earthlink.net.<br /><br />Check out our website at www.paxchristimemphis.org<br /><br /><br />Appendix to Pax Christi News and Notes of January (No. 1) 2009<br /><br />Excerpts from Paul Crum’s press release to the West Tennessee Catholic:<br /><br />Doris Bradshaw recalls being a “little upset” by the letter she received from the nearby Defense Depot in the early 1990’s. Directed at households in the area surrounding the facility, the letter was to alert residents of clean-up efforts to remove toxins and soil contaminants buried on the 640 acres that had been used for military storage since 1942.<br /><br />“I laid the letter aside because I was preoccupied with caring for my grandmother who had been diagnosed with cervical caner,” Bradshaw told members of Pax Christi and their January meeting at Church of the Holy Spirit. “Her doctors told me they had never seen a cancer progress so rapidly,” she continued. “It was literally spreading before our eyes. Her doctors said it was the most aggressive cancer they had ever seen and asked, ‘where did she work?’ I was told it was an environmentally induced disease.”<br /><br />Her grandmother’s death in 1995 brought to Bradshaw’s attention similar illnesses and subsequent deaths of others in her south central Memphis neighborhood.<br /><br />“I didn't know about this thing called pollution,” she told the group. “My grandmother was a housewife – grew her own vegetables and led a healthy lifestyle. This shouldn't have happened.” She delved into her own study of contaminants and the environmental practices of the nearby facility and was shocked to find a laundry list of dangerous substances improperly stored and disposed of there including arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, trichloro-ethylene, carbon tetrachloride, pesticides, dioxin, chlorodane, PCBs and chemical weapons residues. Many who have studied around Dunn Field believe there discarded mustard gas bombs and scores of chemicals buried there. Estimates range from 187 to 289 different compounds.<br /><br />Soon after her grandmother’s death, Bradshaw was instrumental in helping to form Defense Depot Memphis TN – Concerned Citizen Committee. The group is now nearly 14 years old and has signed on hundreds of members. They have attracted the attention and support of prominent environmental justice activists and groups from around the nation, many of whom have visited Memphis for “toxic tours” of the area surrounding the Depot and rallies in support of Bradshaw and her group.<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis hosted Bradshaw to learn more about environmental racism, a term that refers to the idea that African-American neighborhoods and other communities of color are disproportionately overburdened with hazardous waste sites, incinerators, various chemical plants, lead contamination, polluted air, contaminated water supplies, and a variety of other pollution sources. Her talk was part of Pax Christi’s ongoing discussion of racism centered around Joseph Barndt’s book, Dismantling Racism, The Continuing Challenge to White America.<br /><br />Pope Benedict XVI has called for the end of racism and encourages people to reflect on hospitality as a “sign and instrument of communion among human beings” of every race and culture. In August 2008 he noted, “One of humanity’s greatest challenges today is to end racism,” and asked his audience to pray for the building of a “world built on authentic justice and true peace.”<br />The Holy Father also shares Doris Bradshaw’s concern for protecting our environment. He reminded a group of priests last summer, &quot;God entrusted man with the responsibility of creation.” Bradshaw shared with Pax Christi members copies of bills pending before congress, and suggested ways they could help identify environmental abuses all around the Memphis area.<br />She believes her work is not only for the current residents of the Memphis Defense Depot Area, but for generations yet unborn that will be affected through the genes of small children that will become their parents someday.<br /><br />Pax Christi Memphis - News and Notes<br /><br />Number 12, December 2008<br /><br />God's word proclaims the oneness of the human family -- from the first words of Genesis, to the &quot;Come, Lord Jesus&quot; of the Book of Revelation. God's word in Genesis announces that all men and women are created in God's image; not just some races and racial types, but all bear the imprint of the Creator and are enlivened by the breath of His one Spirit.<br /><br />U.S. Catholic Bishops Pastoral Letter on Racism, 1979<br /><br />Thanks to Renewing Members<br /><br />We have received some contributions to our treasury and thank those who have responded to our annual appeal. We welcome the participation of those who have not yet renewed their support.<br /><br />All funds collected by Pax Christi Memphis are used locally. Membership in Pax Christi USA is to be sent directly by each member to the national office.<br /><br />Suggested levels of support are: $15 for an individual; $20 for a family; $5 for anyone on limited income. Please send your contribution to Pax Christi Memphis, 4043 Allison Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38122. Please include your current address, phone number and email address in your mailing. You may use the form found at the end of the November News and Note to provide this information.<br /><br />December 2 Meeting<br /><br />Fourteen members of the local Pax Christi community engaged in study and discussion of Dismantling Racism: The Continuing Challenge to White America. Each person presented a summary of a small section of the readings from page 64 to 87. A lively exchange came after the presentations. Members shared personal experiences and divergent views, sometimes taking issue with the author’s point of view.<br /><br />Our meeting was concluded with a prayer commemorating the lives of the four women martyrs of El Salvador. We met on the 28th anniversary of their deaths.<br /><br />January 6 Gathering<br /><br />Doris Bradshaw of Defense Depot of Memphis, Tennessee, Concerned Citizens Committee (DDMT-CCC) will address our community on the topic of environmental racism. Pages 75 – 100 of Dismantling Racism are related to this topic and serve as background for Ms. Bradshaw’s presentation.<br /><br />Advent and Christmas Prayer<br /><br />During the season of celebrating Christ’s coming we reflect on God’s favor to the human race. The birth of the Son of God as one of us affirms the dignity and value of every human life. We ought to remember that, in spite of Italian art and so many Christmas cards, Jesus was born as a person of color. The Roman Empire was an intermingling of many peoples, but most of them were counted as slaves or barbarians. The imperial mentality was a far cry from what the Word of God proclaims. As a praying community we do well to reflect on passages quoted by the U.S. Catholic Bishops Pastoral Letter on Racism of 1979:<br /><br />¶ Luke, 4:17-21<br /><br />¶ Matthew, 25:31-40<br /><br />¶ James, 1:23-24<br /><br />¶ Ephesians, 2;19-20.<br /><br />World Peace Day<br /><br />Forty years ago, Pope Paul VI inaugurated January 1 as a Day of Peace. Since that time Catholics have observed New Year’s Day as a day of prayer for peace. Pax Christi Memphis is invited to gather with the people of the Church of the Holy Spirit to pray for peace at the 10:00 am Eucharist of January 1, 2009.<br /><br />Every first Tuesday of the month, Pax Christi Memphis meets at the Church of the Holy Spirit, 2300 Hickory Crest Drive, 38119, at 7:15 pm.<br /></p>